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Old 02-21-2019, 05:52 AM   #1
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Yeast breads with unusual hydration

Out of idle curiosity, I was googling yeast bread made with unusual ingredients. One that I came across was coffee raisin bread, which looks odd but very delicious. I also found a recipe for orange rosemary bread, which Iíll investigate more later. I also searched for bread made with soda (not baking soda, but Coke or, say, root beer). Not a lot of those. I wonder if the carbonation affects the rise adversely, or if soda is just too sweet.

Do any of you have yeast bread recipes with unusual hydration or other uncommon ingredients?

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Old 02-21-2019, 08:53 AM   #2
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I've made this sweet potato-onion bread several times. It's a pretty color because of the sweet potato and very moist because of the caramelized onions and high hydration. It spread a lot the first time I made it, so now I make it in two cake pans, like focaccia. In fact, I think it's a version of focaccia. Vivian Howard serves it in her restaurant as an appetizer with gorgeous Cherokee tomatoes.

https://www.karenskitchenstories.com...ion-bread.html

I think the acidity of soda would kill the yeast.
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Old 02-21-2019, 09:30 AM   #3
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I've made this sweet potato-onion bread several times. It's a pretty color because of the sweet potato and very moist because of the caramelized onions and high hydration. It spread a lot the first time I made it, so now I make it in two cake pans, like focaccia. In fact, I think it's a version of focaccia. Vivian Howard serves it in her restaurant as an appetizer with gorgeous Cherokee tomatoes.

https://www.karenskitchenstories.com...ion-bread.html

I think the acidity of soda would kill the yeast.
This looks absolutely delicious! It’s next on my “try it” list, as soon as I assemble all the ingredients. I’m guessing I can caramelize the onions and roast the sweet potatoes the night before, too.

I’ll bet this is great with whole wheat flour, too!

Thanks GG!
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Old 02-21-2019, 09:43 AM   #4
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Yes, I've done the vegetables in advance - it works fine. It's an amazingly good bread.

This version of the recipe has more detail and is more interesting to read than the other one

https://www.breadexperience.com/sour...to-onion-loaf/
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:40 AM   #5
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Something that I haven't made for years, but was very good, was English Muffin Bread, which was a batter bread, which was risen once, stirred down, then a small amount of dissolved soda was stirred into the batter, before it was risen in the pan, then baked. When sliced, the open crumb of the bread looked like an English Muffin, and had that flavor of an English Muffin.
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Old 02-21-2019, 11:31 AM   #6
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Something that I haven't made for years, but was very good, was English Muffin Bread, which was a batter bread, which was risen once, stirred down, then a small amount of dissolved soda was stirred into the batter, before it was risen in the pan, then baked. When sliced, the open crumb of the bread looked like an English Muffin, and had that flavor of an English Muffin.
This sounds interesting, but I’m assuming you mean baking soda? I was wondering more about doughs that use actualsoda, as in “soda pop. Your bread sounds a lot like an Irish soda bread. Gotta love that English muffin flavor, right?

Do you have a recipe?
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Old 02-21-2019, 01:21 PM   #7
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I use this English muffin toasting bread recipe. Love it

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/reci...g-bread-recipe
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Old 02-21-2019, 03:51 PM   #8
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I use this English muffin toasting bread recipe. Love it

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/reci...g-bread-recipe
I’ve seen this recipe before on the King Arthur site, but I’ve never tried it. I’ll have to give it a whirl. But the coffee raisin bread comes first!
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Old 02-21-2019, 04:19 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
This sounds interesting, but Iím assuming you mean baking soda? I was wondering more about doughs that use actualsoda, as in ďsoda pop. Your bread sounds a lot like an Irish soda bread. Gotta love that English muffin flavor, right?

Do you have a recipe?
It would be sort of hard to dissolve soda pop! lol

That recipe from KAF is similar, but mine has a first rise of the batter in the bowl. Then the same amount of baking soda (1/4 tsp) is dissolved in 1 tb water, and mixed in.

I remember the loaves dropping later in the baking, when I first tried it, so I tried bread flour, which seemed to have too much gluten, and the crumb was far too open. So after that, I tried just 1 cup of bread flour, which worked best. The KAF regular flour might work well, since it has more gluten than normal unbleached flours.

I'll post the recipe when I go up later.
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Old 02-25-2019, 07:53 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
Out of idle curiosity, I was googling yeast bread made with unusual ingredients. One that I came across was coffee raisin bread, which looks odd but very delicious. I also found a recipe for orange rosemary bread, which I’ll investigate more later. I also searched for bread made with soda (not baking soda, but Coke or, say, root beer). Not a lot of those. I wonder if the carbonation affects the rise adversely, or if soda is just too sweet.

Do any of you have yeast bread recipes with unusual hydration or other uncommon ingredients?
There are breads that are made with beer. I guess the yeast in the hops is supposed to make the bread rise. Either I got old beer or they don't make it the way they used to because the bread I tried to make with beer didn't rise at all and ended up looking like some sad pita bread.

I have a recipe for a baguette that uses 80% hydration. I couldn't get it to not stick to everything and I tried every method known to man and YouTube. I even watched a video where you lift the dough and slap it on the counter. It worked for the French chef, but not for me. I should have charged for that entertainment, though.
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