"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Quick Breads, Muffins & Biscuits
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-23-2011, 01:01 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Baking powder has a shelf life? Would that mean that self-rising flour has a shelf life?
I don't use either one that often and I'll guarantee you that both of mine are at least two years old. I found out last week from King Arthur's help line that yeast is only good for six months if you keep it in the freezer
How's a single guy supposed to learn how to bake if the ingredients keep expiring?

Thanks for that recipe Selkie.
__________________

__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 03:53 PM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 264
Yes. self-rising flour has a shelf life. I put my flour in the freezer.
__________________

__________________
LAJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 03:57 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
Mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 1,810
I've kept yeast in the freezer for up to a year and it's been good.
__________________
www.Mamas-Southern-Cooking.com
Mama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 04:02 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama View Post
I've kept yeast in the freezer for up to a year and it's been good.
Are you talking about active dry or live yeast?

Craig
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 04:14 PM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama View Post
I've kept yeast in the freezer for up to a year and it's been good.
I was keeping it in the fridge. My rises were inconsistent and KA had me do a little test with warm water, sugar and yeast. They said it should bubble and mine did nothing. The fresh stuff I bought definitely works better than the old.

Thanks LAJ, I'll have to start keeping my little used flours in the freezer. I guess since it is old and hasn't been kept in the freezer that my self-rising flour is like regular flour now?

Craig, the yeast is instant. I'm not sure if that's considered active or live.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 04:31 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
FrankZ's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 9,633
I use active dry yeast and put it in the fridge. I buy the jar and haven't had issues with it not doing its thing, I do proof before I make bread. A jar can last as long as 3 months for me, but usually shorter than that.


I was told one time (ok several times) , when I lived in SC, that there is only one flour for biscuits. White Lily. Seems it is a pretty low protein flour (around 8.2% I believe) and that may have something to do with the end product. I was also told, by those same people, that White Lily isn't good for anything else.
__________________
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
FrankZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 04:35 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
Mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 1,810
It's Active dry yeast that I keep in the freezer. As for White Lily Flour. I use their self-rising, AP, cornmeal mix and bread flours and find all of their products to be good.
__________________
www.Mamas-Southern-Cooking.com
Mama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 08:44 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,871
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I have pretty good luck with soft whole grain wheat flour.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 09:10 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Sumner County TN
Posts: 265
Biscuits are 25% fat; pie crust 33%, everything else is technique and preference.
__________________
Nora C
NoraC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 09:12 PM   #20
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,796
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoraC View Post
Biscuits are 25% fat; pie crust 33%, everything else is technique and preference.
I disagree. Biscuits have leavening. Pie crust does not.
__________________

__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.