"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Quick Breads, Muffins & Biscuits
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-17-2009, 04:50 PM   #31
Chef Extraordinaire
 
babetoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: escondido, calif. near san diego
Posts: 14,349
Quote:
Originally Posted by babetoo View Post
i grew up in the south and cornbread was done in heavy iron skillet, in the oven. sorta flat and crispy. mostly now i make a knock off of marie callenders corn bread, kinda light and flaky and sweet. like each for its own merits.

p.s. sometimes i add whole kernel corn and or green chilies, chopped , canned . drain and add to batter, also once in a while cheese.
__________________

__________________
"life isn't about how to survive the storm but how to dance in the rain"
babetoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 07:09 AM   #32
Senior Cook
 
FincaPerlitas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Jose, Costa Rica, Central America
Posts: 285
I always use stone-ground cornmeal and bacon grease for my cornbread. I like to mix wheat flour and cornmeal, because pure cornmeal makes it too dry and crumbly for my taste. The proportions are optional (up to 50/50, depending on personal taste). Here's one of my favorites (Mama has also posted this recipe on her Mama's Southern Cooking website):

2/3 cup plain white cornmeal (preferably stone-ground)
2/3 cup all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 large egg
3 tablespoons (approx.) bacon grease
1 cup (approx.) milk


Melt the bacon grease in an 8" or 9" heavy skillet over medium-high heat (on my electric range I use heat setting 6-7). In a bowl, mix the dry ingredients together with a large spoon. Add the egg and 2/3 of the milk. Stir to mix then pour most of the melted bacon grease into the batter, leaving a little in the bottom of the skillet. Stir again and check the consistency. It should be pourable, about the consistency of thick pancake batter. If needed, add more milk or a little water.
Pour the batter into the skillet, cover and immediately reduce the heat to medium-low (about setting 2-3 on my range). Cook about 12 minutes, until the edges begin to appear dry and it's beginning to set in the center. There should be bubbles on top that aren't closing back up. Run a spatula/ pancake turner under the bread, lift it slightly (it should be firm enough not to break or fall apart), put the skillet upside down over the top, and flip the whole thing so the uncooked portion is now in the bottom of the skillet. Cover again and cook another 10 minutes or so. Turn it out onto a plate, cut into wedges and serve it hot with butter. Serves 6.
__________________

__________________
"Iím going to break one of the rules of the trade here. Iím going to tell you some of the secrets of improvisation. Just remember ó itís always a good idea to follow the directions exactly the first time you try a recipe. But from then on, youíre on your own." - James Beard
FincaPerlitas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 03:56 PM   #33
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
Uncle Bob, I like this brand: All Natural Flours & Corn Meals | Hodgson Mill

I can buy it (usually) at the local WalMart.
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 04:17 PM   #34
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
Uncle Bob, I like this brand: All Natural Flours & Corn Meals | Hodgson Mill

I can buy it (usually) at the local WalMart.
Thanks for the tip....I see some local ground meal here and there, but (in the distant past) it wasn't much punkin!! Not sure if it was the variety of corn, not dried properly prior to milling or what...I considered trying to buy my old miller's mill... If she (the Widow) would even sell it, I would have to build a small out building just to house it...Not sure I wanna get that involved...People worrying you at odd times wanting you to grind a 2 gallon water bucket of corn.. ---- Maybe it's already been sold to another local entrepreneur, and I can take advantage of it...
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 06:10 PM   #35
Senior Cook
 
FincaPerlitas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Jose, Costa Rica, Central America
Posts: 285
Uncle Bob,

I've been buying my stoneground cornmeal and grits from Nora Mill Granery in Helen, Georgia: www.noramill.com. They also have great sourwood honey and blackberry jam, among other items. The prices are reasonable, the quality is great and they're nice folks. You might want to give them a try.
__________________
"Iím going to break one of the rules of the trade here. Iím going to tell you some of the secrets of improvisation. Just remember ó itís always a good idea to follow the directions exactly the first time you try a recipe. But from then on, youíre on your own." - James Beard
FincaPerlitas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 06:36 PM   #36
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by FincaPerlitas View Post
Uncle Bob,

I've been buying my stoneground cornmeal and grits from Nora Mill Granery in Helen, Georgia: www.noramill.com. They also have great sourwood honey and blackberry jam, among other items. The prices are reasonable, the quality is great and they're nice folks. You might want to give them a try.
Thank you my friend...I've had their Stone ground grits in the past, but not their meal... and as you say...Good stuff!!! Right now I'm finishing up 10 lbs of Anson Mills Antebellum Grits...I will cook a big pot Saturday morning to go with my Country ham and red-eye gravy...Yum!!!

Anson Mills Products
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 07:08 PM   #37
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
THat would make nice corn meal muffins, but for me corn bread is not sweet and has no white flour.

corn meal, eggs, salt, baking soda and powder, buttermilk, into a HOT greased with bacon fat skillet, into a HOT 425/450 oven for 25-30 min. That will give you cornbread.
And gluten free eaters will love you for it too!
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 07:28 PM   #38
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410 View Post
THat would make nice corn meal muffins, but for me corn bread is not sweet and has no white flour.

corn meal, eggs, salt, baking soda and powder, buttermilk, into a HOT greased with bacon fat skillet, into a HOT 425/450 oven for 25-30 min. That will give you cornbread.
And gluten free eaters will love you for it too!
I'll take 1/3 of that skillet.......
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2009, 02:52 AM   #39
Master Chef
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 8,514
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
Uncle Bob, I like this brand: All Natural Flours & Corn Meals | Hodgson Mill

I can buy it (usually) at the local WalMart.
i also use this brand when i can find it.
__________________

__________________
Your hand and your mouth agreed many years ago that, as far as chocolate is concerned, there is no need to involve your brain. -Dave Barry
msmofet is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cornbread, sweet

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.