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Old 03-23-2008, 02:41 PM   #11
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The dry ingredients are measured in mixing spoons for dry ingredients. So, I suppose that would be by volume?
Thank you for your suggestions Mozart. I'll definately give that a try. Getting the pea sized blobs has not been a problem when working with my hands. However, I can see how working in the buttermilk with my hands could lead to overworking. I think I'll also give the flattening out by hand thing a try. I've used a roller both times and when baked seem to have to 'perfect' of a top on them. But, the ones I make from the scraps by hand seem not have more of a ragged top. With the biscuit cutter (a three inch cookie cutter) I generally punch it straight down through and slide it away so I can pick up the biscuit.
Where do you think the bitterness is coming from? Do you think it is the harder flours that I'm using? The flours I've used have both been 10% protien. I've heard that the white lily is softer so I think that might help the bitterness. Also, do you think I could reduce the baking soda or omit it from those recipes. I've read or heard somewhere that soda can make things a little bitter.
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Old 03-23-2008, 03:16 PM   #12
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I mix my dough in the food processor. Works great. Just pulse a few times and you've got just the right texture. I agree that you should not twist whatever you are using to cut the biscuits.
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Old 03-23-2008, 03:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KLogan8388 View Post
The dry ingredients are measured in mixing spoons for dry ingredients. So, I suppose that would be by volume?
Thank you for your suggestions Mozart. I'll definately give that a try. Getting the pea sized blobs has not been a problem when working with my hands. However, I can see how working in the buttermilk with my hands could lead to overworking. I think I'll also give the flattening out by hand thing a try. I've used a roller both times and when baked seem to have to 'perfect' of a top on them. But, the ones I make from the scraps by hand seem not have more of a ragged top. With the biscuit cutter (a three inch cookie cutter) I generally punch it straight down through and slide it away so I can pick up the biscuit.
Where do you think the bitterness is coming from? Do you think it is the harder flours that I'm using? The flours I've used have both been 10% protien. I've heard that the white lily is softer so I think that might help the bitterness. Also, do you think I could reduce the baking soda or omit it from those recipes. I've read or heard somewhere that soda can make things a little bitter.
Not sure because I've never had bitterness in mine, but like I said, I use self rising flour so not baking power or baking soda is added. If you don't want to use self rising then you may have to play with the soda. That recipe seem like a lot to me when you gave it, but I don't use it so am not sure.

Oh, and always brush the tops with plenty of melted butter as they come out. Crisco imparts zero taste and the rest have very little. Only the butter really adds flavor along with the buttermilk. For that reason, I would never use all Crisco.

Actually, I've heard that pure lard will produce the best combination of taste and texture, but I have never used it.
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Old 03-23-2008, 03:34 PM   #14
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Ah, biscuits... I struggled with them for years, and in the last month, I got a recipe that works great every time. It's allegedly the original Red Lobster biscuit recipe and it's got butter (not Crisco) and Bisquick in it.

I think one secret to it is to beat it with a wooden spoon for 30 seconds. That's hard work, but the dough gets light and airy. I'm sure the melted butter in the batter is partly what keeps them from getting dry. Plus, the tops get brushed with melted butter, like mozart mentioned above. And the finished product is melt-in-your-mouth.
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Old 03-26-2008, 06:07 PM   #15
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Mamas-Southern-Cooking.com...buttermilk biscuits and more---also Mary B's frozen biscuits are excellant...from lit'l. ol' Bagdad, FL...we used to make 'snake' biscuits when I was young and in Cub Scouts...Mayo(yes)-Milk & self-rising flour--rolled them out long(hence 'snake') & cooked them over the campfire...best advice-don't overmix!
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Old 03-26-2008, 08:37 PM   #16
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something I can help with! I learned how to make my buttermilk biscuits from my granny, since we are from GA i think hers are out of this world. ( REAL SOUTHERN)

2 cups of self rising flour ( i like white lilly)
1/2 - 1 teaspoon of baking powder
1/3ish cups of marginuine, or crisco
3/4 cup of buttermilk

Mix together,

You can use a glass, cookie cutter, biscuit cutter if you want. But what i do is just make them about how big i want and then put them on a cookie sheet

Bake at 450 for 8-10 minutes

At about 6 minutes i take them and put butter on top of them that way there is no flour left of top
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