"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Quick Breads, Muffins & Biscuits
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-21-2007, 05:39 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Cottrell View Post
My goodness Katie E - I was thinking the exact same thing! You want to tell miniman what we're talking about? It would be unfriendly for him not to know. You are the head cook! I'm just a bottle washer.
Okaaaay!

FRIED CORNMEAL MUSH
(Serves 4 to 6)
4 cups water, divided
1 cup yellow cornmeal, plus additional for cooking
1 tsp. salt
Cooking oil, for frying

Heat to boiling 3 cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix cornmeal with salt and add 1 cup cold water. Stir to mix well.

Pour cornmeal mixture into boiling water, stirring constantly.

Cook until thickened, stirring frequently. Cover; continue cooking over low heat for about 10 minutes or until mixture has become VERY thick. It should resemble ultra-thick cream of wheat.

Remove from heat and pour into an ungreased loaf pan or into several tall, straight-sided glasses. Refrigerate until completely firm. Overnight is best.

When completely cold, slide out of loaf pan or glasses and slice about ¼-inch thick. Coat both sides of each slice in corn meal. Set aside on waxed paper.

Heat about ¼-inch oil in a heavy skillet until very hot. Drop mush slices into the oil and cook several minutes on each side until lightly browned. Serve with butter and syrup of your choice. Be careful. The inside of the mush is extremely hot. Note: When I was a child, my fried mush was served with white/clear Karo syrup and that’s how I like it best to this day.
__________________

__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2007, 05:41 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by miniman
Could someone explain it for me and give me a basic recipe to try (there is so much enthusiasm about it, I want to join in).
Ray....There at least 101,000 Cornbread recipes, and counting.

Hear is one that is "basic" to me.

2 Cups Self Rising Corn Meal
2 Chicken Eggs
1 Cup Milk (more or less)
1/4 Cup Vegetable Oil

Preheat oven to 400*
Place all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well!
Grease a 10 in. cast iron skillet with 2 tablespoons of oil. Place on the stove and heat until very hot!!! Pour the batter into the skillet. Walk to the sink, rinse out the bowl. Go back to the stove and put the skillet in the 400* oven for 20-25 minutes or until brown. Invert on to a plate, cut into pie shape pieces. Slice a piece open and slather with butter/margarine.

From here there are many, many variations on a theme. Some with flour added, some with buttermilk, some with a little sugar added and the list goes on, and on, and on ad nauseam!!!!!
__________________

__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2007, 05:54 PM   #13
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Ray....There at least 101,000 Cornbread recipes, and counting.

Hear is one that is "basic" to me.

2 Cups Self Rising Corn Meal
2 Chicken Eggs
1 Cup Milk (more or less)
1/4 Cup Vegetable Oil

Preheat oven to 400*
Place all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well!
Grease a 10 in. cast iron skillet with 2 tablespoons of oil. Place on the stove and heat until very hot!!! Pour the batter into the skillet. Walk to the sink, rinse out the bowl. Go back to the stove and put the skillet in the 400* oven for 20-25 minutes or until brown. Invert on to a plate, cut into pie shape pieces. Slice a piece open and slather with butter/margarine.

From here there are many, many variations on a theme. Some with flour added, some with buttermilk, some with a little sugar added and the list goes on, and on, and on ad nauseam!!!!!
Thanks UB. I was wondering what you were soaking in that sweet milk.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2007, 06:00 PM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Not this one (recipe) Bill...Just trying to give Ray a starting point.
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2007, 01:32 AM   #15
Executive Chef
 
miniman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Basingstoke, England
Posts: 4,687
Thanks everyone for all your help. Il earned something today.

Katie - the cornmeal mush sounds a bit how I understand you would cook polenta. is it the same thing (more or less)
__________________
miniman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2007, 01:38 AM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,732
miniman, ask them if cornbread should be sweet or savory.

go ahead, ask them... go ahead
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2007, 01:41 AM   #17
Executive Chef
 
miniman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Basingstoke, England
Posts: 4,687
Suspect this a stir up of a big debate. Bu always up for a dare.

Should cornbread be sweet of savory. My own opinion is probably for savory but thats me.
__________________
miniman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2007, 07:08 AM   #18
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Monroe, Michigan
Posts: 5,912
Send a message via Yahoo to Barb L.
I only had sweet growing up (johnny cake), here in Michigan. Still prefer it. No southern blood here.
__________________
Grandma's Boys - Isaiah (11) Cameron (3 )
Barb L. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2007, 07:47 AM   #19
Executive Chef
 
YT2095's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Just left of Europe and down a bit.
Posts: 3,875
Send a message via MSN to YT2095
mimiman take a look here: ASDA Recipes - Chilli cornbread
I buy my cornmeal at ASDA, Natco is the brand I buy.

most local asian shops will sell it also.

although I`ve never made cornbread, it Does make nice corndogs and a crispy coating on Chicken :)
__________________
So long and Thanks for all the Fish ;)

YT2095 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2007, 08:55 AM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by miniman View Post
Suspect this a stir up of a big debate. Bu always up for a dare.

Should cornbread be sweet of savory. My own opinion is probably for savory but thats me.
It can be either way, Ray. My relatives from the North always put sugar in theirs. Folks here in the South usually leave it out. It's really your preference and what it's going to be served with. I always leave out sugar if I'm making cornbread for my holiday stuffing/dressing.
__________________

__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.