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Old 06-24-2006, 07:57 PM   #1
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Cornmeal

What do you all consider the best corn meal for corn bread White, Roasted, Yellow what?

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Old 06-24-2006, 08:50 PM   #2
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My opinion is, of what I can buy in the grocery store, whole grain stone ground yellow corn meal is the best for corn bread. I think the flavor deteriorates fairly quickly as soon as it's milled, so I freeze it as soon as I bring it home. As yet, I don't have the right kind of mill to grind my own corn meal, but I look forward to the day when I do.

There is a lot I don't know and I need some help here. In the context of corn bread what does roasted corn mean? Of course, roasted sweet corn could be added to corn bread batter but it wouldn't be one of the primary ingredients. Please explain.

I don't remember seeing corn bread made from white corn. I think it would taste the same but look unusual.

Looking forward to future posts.
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Old 06-25-2006, 07:15 AM   #3
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I've never seen 'roasted' corn meal. As for white or yellow, it's a regional thing. Some areas of the South use only white cornmeal, others only yellow. Matter of fact, here in Charleston, it's even hard to find fresh yellow corn - everyone seems to be growing the white only.

I buy only the stone-ground or water-ground corn meal and grits, then keep it in the fridge.
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Old 06-25-2006, 10:34 AM   #4
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Marmalady, When corn bread is made from white corn meal is the crumb the color of white bread?
I'd never heard of water ground corn meal. Googling the term only produced two relevant hits. One for Cherokee Saunooke's Mill in Cherokee, NC and the other, a general information Food Network page about corn. Neither site gave any information about the process. Can you fill us in at all?
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Old 06-25-2006, 10:37 AM   #5
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I like the yellow cornmeal for cornbread. I always figured the white cornmeal is for making grits.
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Old 06-25-2006, 12:00 PM   #6
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No, white cornmeal is used 'exclusively' in some Southern states - in fact, yellow cornmeal is considered 'yankee', lol.

The color isn't 'white-white' like white bread; think of what white corn looks like; not bright white, but more of a pale, pale butter color. The white cornmeal/cornbread is the same.

I personally like yellow best - yankee or Southerner! - 'cause I think it just has more flavor.
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Old 06-25-2006, 12:01 PM   #7
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White corn meal is NOT grits. Grits are grits. I prefer yellow for all. Stone ground is a method--very nice results. the grains are not so uniform. White cornmeal--for cornbread (as in cornmeal mixes) is a lot more prevalent.
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Old 06-25-2006, 12:25 PM   #8
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Gretchen - - 'grits IS grits!

Water ground is a term used for how they mill the grains. If water drives the grinding stones, then it's called 'water ground', as opposed to 'stone-ground' - even though they're all stone ground.
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Old 06-25-2006, 12:39 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
Gretchen - - 'grits IS grits!

Water ground is a term used for how they mill the grains. If water drives the grinding stones, then it's called 'water ground', as opposed to 'stone-ground' - even though they're all stone ground.
To some, including me, grits is ground from hominy. The tense is correct but sure sounds funny.

I thought that might be what what "water ground" meant. I understand why a mill would use the term for marketing reasons, but not why The Food Network would imply a difference. I've never heard of electric corn meal or diesel corn meal.
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Old 06-25-2006, 11:18 PM   #10
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Grits can be made from either plain dried corn (corn grits) or dried hominy (hominy grits) ground to a coarse sand-like texture. Hominy is hulled corn which had been stripped of its bran and germ, usually by soaking in a lye solution - which gives it a different flavor. The corn, in either case, can be either white or yellow. Can't find the etymology of the term - but since it is ground to the texture of sand, and sand is gritty, ergo grits?

Personally - I was never a big fan of hominy grits ... but I loved corn grits, which I guess is more like cornmeal mush, which sounds so much more exotic if you call it polenta.

As for white, yellow, roasted cornmeal to make cornbread ... I don't think you would notice any difference in texture, they are interchangeable. Yellow corn is generally a little sweeter, expecially when fresh, than white - but I don't know if that holds true for cornmeal. White cornmeal cornbread is probably more common in the South (some regions more than others) - but a fair amount of "Yankee Cornbread" (same recipe but using yellow cornmeal) can also be found. Of course, Southern cooks also argue about adding sugar, or not, to the recipe - I think the general rule is corn muffins have sugar and cornbread does not, from what I can remember. Of course, there is also the argument that "pie are round - cornbread are square" (sorry, old Southern joke).

As for roasted-corn meal - it could add a slightly different flavor. Don't know - I never tried it, never even thought about it. But, I must admit that my thought when I thought about using roasted corn meal was something Bobby Flay would create .... roasted blue corn cornbread.
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