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Old 04-02-2015, 11:20 PM   #21
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You can't use a regular can opener on the bottom of the tuna cans I have seen for at least 10 years.
If I had to I would buy the tuna from Italy. (very expensive) Although the cans are smaller now. But a can for diced tomatoes, mostly house brands has the regular ends that can be opened. They are the perfect size for EMs.
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Old 04-02-2015, 11:37 PM   #22
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If I had to I would buy the tuna from Italy. (very expensive) Although the cans are smaller now. But a can for diced tomatoes, mostly house brands has the regular ends that can be opened. They are the perfect size for EMs.
Yeah, that's what we use. They wastefully take a lot of space to store and don't work quite as well. We are hanging on to them because so many cans have round bottom edges now.
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Old 04-03-2015, 07:23 AM   #23
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Yeah, that's what we use. They wastefully take a lot of space to store and don't work quite as well. We are hanging on to them because so many cans have round bottom edges now.
Fortunately for me, I have some empty shelves way up high. I have up there a large platter and a glass pitcher. That leaves me three empty shelves. But I have a son who can reach up there without even stretching.

I have out of necessity placed a few of items on top of the fridge. I have never in all my years of homemaking had anything on top of the fridge. I have my Blue Willow Cake stand, a Depression Era Batter Bowl and a large bowl that I use often, and it won't fit into any of the cabinets.

I hate having items on the fridge. It makes it difficult to clean the top.
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Old 04-04-2015, 03:00 PM   #24
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"The Dough Also Rises" (with apologies to EH)

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Made a batch (22) of english muffins today.
You've whetted my appetite and I've got some muffin dough rising as I write. I'll cheat though - sheet pan in oven to heat up, floured well and the muffins baked on it for five minutes each side. They turn out the same but for me the method is more reliable and quicker - my griddle will only cook three or four at a time.

Got the bit between my teeth now. Dough for some oatmeal bread is also rising and I've mixed some batter for Staffordshire oatcakes which will cook on the griddle. These last are like a thin-ish oatmeal yeasted pancakes and eaten with bacon, etc., unlike Scottish oatcakes which are thin and crisp and often eaten with cheese.

Thinking about making a (Cornish) saffron cake while I'm at it. Not tried one before but the recipe doesn't include eggs so will be a dry-run for when my vegan friend comes to visit in the summer.
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Old 04-04-2015, 03:35 PM   #25
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Do you freeze some of your bakes MC ?

I remember Staffordshire oatcakes well although I can't eat them now (coeliac) , hard to describe them though if someone isnt familiar with them as they are like a big floppy pancake as opposed to a crisp biscuit type oatcake .
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Old 04-04-2015, 03:56 PM   #26
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Do you freeze some of your bakes MC ?

I remember Staffordshire oatcakes well although I can't eat them now (coeliac) , hard to describe them though if someone isnt familiar with them as they are like a big floppy pancake as opposed to a crisp biscuit type oatcake .
Yes, in cling film and a poly bag for up to a month. They may be OK for longer but don't usually last that long.

What a pity you can't enjoy the Staffs oatcakes. I sometimes make a quick lunch with one or two of them wrapped round fingers of cheese and a spoonful of chutney and zapped in the microwave.
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Old 04-04-2015, 05:27 PM   #27
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Oh! My! Yes, please, another request for the recipe! And I bet none of us would object if you wanted to send a half-dozen to each of us that asked for the recipe. But I'll be happy to make my own.
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Old 04-04-2015, 06:29 PM   #28
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Fat chance I'll ever make them, (I can screw up anything baked) but they are beautiful indeed.
I really like English muffins though and I'll pass on any less expensive brands to only buy Thomas' English Muffins. Nothing else will do. Love those nooks and crannies.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:31 AM   #29
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Thanks, S&P. It's a yeast dough, eh? There is something about yeast that gives me the shakes. It shouldn't since I have baked bread before and had success. I'll have to woman-up and get brave only because your finished result is so danged pretty.
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Old 04-05-2015, 08:37 AM   #30
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Thanks, S&P. It's a yeast dough, eh? There is something about yeast that gives me the shakes. It shouldn't since I have baked bread before and had success. I'll have to woman-up and get brave only because your finished result is so danged pretty.
You can do it CG. I have faith in you. And I expect to see pictures. Good or bad. But I know they will be pretty.

Anytime I want to make something I find the print is usually too small and if it is on the net, I can't be running back and forth looking at the screen. So I have this little gadget that holds paper upright for typing. I have had it for years and it is only 1.5 inches wide. I copy the recipe on to an 8x11 and then adjust the print and recipe to the way I work. Right now English Muffins are clipped in it.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:46 AM   #31
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Thanks, S&P. It's a yeast dough, eh? There is something about yeast that gives me the shakes. It shouldn't since I have baked bread before and had success. I'll have to woman-up and get brave only because your finished result is so danged pretty.
Yeast is easy. Store it properly and it will work every time. If you are unsure, proof it by taking part of the liquid for your recipe and heating it to a warm 110°-120°, dissolve in 1/2 tsp of sugar and the yeast. It should turn creamy and even a little bit foamy in about 5-10 minutes. If there is no reaction then the yeast is dead and it's time to buy more.

For most yeast breads, I add 1 teaspoon of vital wheat gluten for each cup of bread flour. If I only have all purpose flour I add one tablespoon per 2 cups. It makes all the difference in my breads. I also prefer to weigh the ingredients when I can find the right proportions (especially the dry ingredients - flour should be right around 5 ounces or 142 grams per cup).
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:09 PM   #32
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...
For most yeast breads, I add 1 teaspoon of vital wheat gluten for each cup of bread flour. If I only have all purpose flour I add one tablespoon per 2 cups. It makes all the difference in my breads. I also prefer to weigh the ingredients when I can find the right proportions (especially the dry ingredients - flour should be right around 5 ounces or 142 grams per cup).
Now I'm confused. As I understand it bread flour is hard flour and has more gluten than all purpose flour. Do you find that bread flour needs more added gluten than AP flour does?
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:12 PM   #33
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Thanks S & P.

The recipe looks straight forward.

The technique is what I was most interested in.

Did you really flip them every 2 minutes?

That's 8 1/2 times.

No wonder mine never turn out so nice.

Guess it's that 1/2 turn that gets me.
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:43 PM   #34
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Now I'm confused. As I understand it bread flour is hard flour and has more gluten than all purpose flour. Do you find that bread flour needs more added gluten than AP flour does?
Just for insurance. I've experimented and find that this works best for me. I'm also baking at 4000 feet above sea level. A little more gluten just gives the dough added binding power to hold in the bubbles the yeast creates.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:04 PM   #35
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When I make English muffins, I use the recipe from Joy of Cooking, th edition from the '70s. I just replace the AP flour in the recipe with whole wheat flour and it works great. I have even made them on an electric skillet in hotel rooms.
That's the recipe I've used, too.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:25 PM   #36
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Just for insurance. I've experimented and find that this works best for me. I'm also baking at 4000 feet above sea level. A little more gluten just gives the dough added binding power to hold in the bubbles the yeast creates.
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That's the recipe I've used, too.
But why does the flour with higher gluten content need more added gluten?
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Old 04-05-2015, 03:53 PM   #37
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I hate having items on the fridge. It makes it difficult to clean the top.
I agree with you, Addie. I hate having stuff on top of the fridge. I keep mine clear. My parents keep cereal. my dad's hunting cap, and another "basket" of stuff up there. I hated having to move stuff off the top of the fridge to clean it growing up--hate it still when I am there--probably why I don't keep stuff on top of my fridge. I hate clutter in the kitchen. I try to keep clutter down in the rest of the house, but the kitchen is definitely s/place where I hate having clutter.
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Old 04-05-2015, 04:00 PM   #38
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I agree with you, Addie. I hate having stuff on top of the fridge. I keep mine clear. My parents keep cereal. my dad's hunting cap, and another "basket" of stuff up there. I hated having to move stuff off the top of the fridge to clean it growing up--hate it still when I am there--probably why I don't keep stuff on top of my fridge. I hate clutter in the kitchen. I try to keep clutter down in the rest of the house, but the kitchen is definitely s/place where I hate having clutter.
I have a somewhat small galley kitchen. So it has to stay neat and clean. One dirty pot and I feel like the whole kitchen is in total disarray. But because my kitchen is small, I have no choice but to place some special dishes and bowl that are very important to me. They went there as a last resort.
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Old 04-05-2015, 06:52 PM   #39
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But why does the flour with higher gluten content need more added gluten?
I just find it more dependable, that's all. I like a nice high loaf with with a light crumb that has a little bit of chew - not tough, just a good texture. It doesn't hurt anything to add some gluten even to bread flour. I've found that I get better, more consistent results with it. I just add a bit more when I'm not using bread flour.

I've also started using a conditioner too, for many of the breads I make. That too isn't needed, but it gives my homemade bread a longer shelf life, so I feel that I am ahead of the game by using it. With just 2 of us in the house, a loaf can last for 2 or 3 days, so by adding the conditioner, I get a little more life out of it.
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Old 04-05-2015, 07:40 PM   #40
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I just find it more dependable, that's all. I like a nice high loaf with with a light crumb that has a little bit of chew - not tough, just a good texture. It doesn't hurt anything to add some gluten even to bread flour. I've found that I get better, more consistent results with it. I just add a bit more when I'm not using bread flour.

I've also started using a conditioner too, for many of the breads I make. That too isn't needed, but it gives my homemade bread a longer shelf life, so I feel that I am ahead of the game by using it. With just 2 of us in the house, a loaf can last for 2 or 3 days, so by adding the conditioner, I get a little more life out of it.
So was the following a typo?
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...For most yeast breads, I add 1 teaspoon of vital wheat gluten for each cup of bread flour. If I only have all purpose flour I add one tablespoon per 2 cups.
What do you use as bread conditioner? Does it do anything other than extend shelf life?
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