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Old 04-05-2015, 11:46 AM   #31
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Thanks, S&P. It's a yeast dough, eh? There is something about yeast that gives me the shakes. It shouldn't since I have baked bread before and had success. I'll have to woman-up and get brave only because your finished result is so danged pretty.
Yeast is easy. Store it properly and it will work every time. If you are unsure, proof it by taking part of the liquid for your recipe and heating it to a warm 110-120, dissolve in 1/2 tsp of sugar and the yeast. It should turn creamy and even a little bit foamy in about 5-10 minutes. If there is no reaction then the yeast is dead and it's time to buy more.

For most yeast breads, I add 1 teaspoon of vital wheat gluten for each cup of bread flour. If I only have all purpose flour I add one tablespoon per 2 cups. It makes all the difference in my breads. I also prefer to weigh the ingredients when I can find the right proportions (especially the dry ingredients - flour should be right around 5 ounces or 142 grams per cup).
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:09 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
...
For most yeast breads, I add 1 teaspoon of vital wheat gluten for each cup of bread flour. If I only have all purpose flour I add one tablespoon per 2 cups. It makes all the difference in my breads. I also prefer to weigh the ingredients when I can find the right proportions (especially the dry ingredients - flour should be right around 5 ounces or 142 grams per cup).
Now I'm confused. As I understand it bread flour is hard flour and has more gluten than all purpose flour. Do you find that bread flour needs more added gluten than AP flour does?
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:12 PM   #33
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Thanks S & P.

The recipe looks straight forward.

The technique is what I was most interested in.

Did you really flip them every 2 minutes?

That's 8 1/2 times.

No wonder mine never turn out so nice.

Guess it's that 1/2 turn that gets me.
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:43 PM   #34
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Now I'm confused. As I understand it bread flour is hard flour and has more gluten than all purpose flour. Do you find that bread flour needs more added gluten than AP flour does?
Just for insurance. I've experimented and find that this works best for me. I'm also baking at 4000 feet above sea level. A little more gluten just gives the dough added binding power to hold in the bubbles the yeast creates.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:04 PM   #35
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When I make English muffins, I use the recipe from Joy of Cooking, th edition from the '70s. I just replace the AP flour in the recipe with whole wheat flour and it works great. I have even made them on an electric skillet in hotel rooms.
That's the recipe I've used, too.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:25 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Just for insurance. I've experimented and find that this works best for me. I'm also baking at 4000 feet above sea level. A little more gluten just gives the dough added binding power to hold in the bubbles the yeast creates.
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That's the recipe I've used, too.
But why does the flour with higher gluten content need more added gluten?
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Old 04-05-2015, 03:53 PM   #37
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I hate having items on the fridge. It makes it difficult to clean the top.
I agree with you, Addie. I hate having stuff on top of the fridge. I keep mine clear. My parents keep cereal. my dad's hunting cap, and another "basket" of stuff up there. I hated having to move stuff off the top of the fridge to clean it growing up--hate it still when I am there--probably why I don't keep stuff on top of my fridge. I hate clutter in the kitchen. I try to keep clutter down in the rest of the house, but the kitchen is definitely s/place where I hate having clutter.
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Old 04-05-2015, 04:00 PM   #38
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I agree with you, Addie. I hate having stuff on top of the fridge. I keep mine clear. My parents keep cereal. my dad's hunting cap, and another "basket" of stuff up there. I hated having to move stuff off the top of the fridge to clean it growing up--hate it still when I am there--probably why I don't keep stuff on top of my fridge. I hate clutter in the kitchen. I try to keep clutter down in the rest of the house, but the kitchen is definitely s/place where I hate having clutter.
I have a somewhat small galley kitchen. So it has to stay neat and clean. One dirty pot and I feel like the whole kitchen is in total disarray. But because my kitchen is small, I have no choice but to place some special dishes and bowl that are very important to me. They went there as a last resort.
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Old 04-05-2015, 06:52 PM   #39
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But why does the flour with higher gluten content need more added gluten?
I just find it more dependable, that's all. I like a nice high loaf with with a light crumb that has a little bit of chew - not tough, just a good texture. It doesn't hurt anything to add some gluten even to bread flour. I've found that I get better, more consistent results with it. I just add a bit more when I'm not using bread flour.

I've also started using a conditioner too, for many of the breads I make. That too isn't needed, but it gives my homemade bread a longer shelf life, so I feel that I am ahead of the game by using it. With just 2 of us in the house, a loaf can last for 2 or 3 days, so by adding the conditioner, I get a little more life out of it.
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Old 04-05-2015, 07:40 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I just find it more dependable, that's all. I like a nice high loaf with with a light crumb that has a little bit of chew - not tough, just a good texture. It doesn't hurt anything to add some gluten even to bread flour. I've found that I get better, more consistent results with it. I just add a bit more when I'm not using bread flour.

I've also started using a conditioner too, for many of the breads I make. That too isn't needed, but it gives my homemade bread a longer shelf life, so I feel that I am ahead of the game by using it. With just 2 of us in the house, a loaf can last for 2 or 3 days, so by adding the conditioner, I get a little more life out of it.
So was the following a typo?
Quote:
...For most yeast breads, I add 1 teaspoon of vital wheat gluten for each cup of bread flour. If I only have all purpose flour I add one tablespoon per 2 cups.
What do you use as bread conditioner? Does it do anything other than extend shelf life?
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