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Old 05-08-2008, 08:56 PM   #21
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All interesting information. I've been baking all our bread goods since Hector was a pup and have never had any challenges.

One thing I do do is to use an electronic scale to measure my ingredients. (Use it in all my cooking.) As you might guess, humidity can make a difference in how much flour to use.

I also use my microwave as a proofing box. I put a microwave-safe bowl into the microwave - with about 1 cup of water - microwave on HIGH for 2 minutes. Leave the door closed.

Shape my loaves and put into the, now warmed and moist, microwave cavity along with the bowl of water.

Usually I allow nearly 60 minutes for proofing. When ready to bake, put loaves in oven at 400F and bake for about 25 to 30 minutes. I use glass pans most of the time FYI.
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Old 05-08-2008, 08:56 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
Thanks Pacanis. Of course, now as I actually read Betty's remarks without 3 kids in the room, I see she was saying the recipe said to let it rise for an hour after the loaf is shaped so the doubling doesn't apply. But I'm pretty sure it's over-rising that is causing the air pocket - that was what caused mine. You may even have to cut the rise to 30 minutes.
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Like I just said, it seems like in baking you really have to be able to adjust a recipe, just depending on the weather. I can see where having something to physically compare the size to could really help. Especially when doing other things.
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Old 05-08-2008, 08:58 PM   #23
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at work when i make bagel dough, we measure the water and flour all by weight.
in the summer we cut about a half a pound of water out of some batches.
Of course now that we have new owners they just might fix the air conditioning for us......
something new every day.
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Old 05-08-2008, 09:02 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
All interesting information. I've been baking all our bread goods since Hector was a pup and have never had any challenges.

One thing I do do is to use an electronic scale to measure my ingredients. (Use it in all my cooking.) As you might guess, humidity can make a difference in how much flour to use.

I also use my microwave as a proofing box. I put a microwave-safe bowl into the microwave - with about 1 cup of water - microwave on HIGH for 2 minutes. Leave the door closed.

Shape my loaves and put into the, now warmed and moist, microwave cavity along with the bowl of water.

Usually I allow nearly 60 minutes for proofing. When ready to bake, put loaves in oven at 400F and bake for about 25 to 30 minutes. I use glass pans most of the time FYI.
Ever since you mentioned letting the dough rise in the microwave, that's what I've done and it works perfectly!!! Do ya'll have high humidity in Kentucky? It's relatively high here, but at the coast - it's really high. I had to screw around with my flour to liquids ratio a lot down there. I really want to start baking by weight like you do so I can bake anywhere!
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Old 05-08-2008, 09:06 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
Ever since you mentioned letting the dough rise in the microwave, that's what I've done and it works perfectly!!! Do ya'll have high humidity in Kentucky? It's relatively high here, but at the coast - it's really high. I had to screw around with my flour to liquids ratio a lot down there. I really want to start baking by weight like you do so I can bake
anywhere!
Oh, yeah. We have very high humidity where we are. Sometimes we have to cut it with a machete. It can get very oppressive during the summer months. For that reason, I'm sooooooo glad I cook by weight.
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Old 05-08-2008, 09:17 PM   #26
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Just my two cents. I bake at least once a week, and like you I do most of my kneeding with my KA mixer. I do things more by look and feel than time. When adding flour, I measure what the recipie says, then I add about half of that and mix / knead. The last half goes in about 1/8 cup at a time. I am looking for when the dough will not adhere to the side fo the bowl after a few minites of mixing. I then raise the head and scrape all the dough off the dough hook. I then mix again. If the dough comes off the side of the bowl again I have the liquid balance that works for me.

Rising I also do by look. First rising is till the dough ball doubles in size. Then punch down, knead and form loaves. Second rising is till the loaves double in size, then bake. I brush the top of the loaves with water just befpore baking to help with oven spring. While heating the oven, I put a pie plate of water in the bottom of the oven to inject steam intoo the first 200 bimutes of bakiing or so. This also enhances oven spring.

If the big holes are always at the top of the loaf, I think the moisturizing can help. If the dough has a kind of skin on it when it goes in the oven then that can onterfere with baking.

Just a few thoughts.

AC
Brush with water? I'll give that a try.

How does the water inside the oven affect the crust? Does it make the crust harder or softer?
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Old 05-09-2008, 11:12 AM   #27
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Try shaping your dough differently. I am pretty sure that when you fold it to make the loaf, you are trapping air in the fold.

If you were using too much water, your bread would have lots of large bubbles in it, not just one big one.
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Old 05-09-2008, 02:14 PM   #28
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I would go along with the theory that the second rise is too long.
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Old 05-09-2008, 03:44 PM   #29
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Thanks everyone for your help.

Just for future use if needed one person sent me this link and it's very interesting. I thought you might like to take a look at it.

FARINEX - BIENVENUE
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Old 05-09-2008, 10:04 PM   #30
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Hi,
How much salt is in the recipe?

Salt conditions the dough, i.e., it makes the gluten more stable and controls the rate of fermentation and rising, and consequently the size of air hole. In addition, the points made by other posters regarding kneading and knocking back are relevant.

Some of the best advice, regarding bread, on the web, may be accessed through the BBC Food Messageboard, Food Chat site. Go there, post a question and you will be directed to the appropriate contact.

Archiduc
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