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Old 05-12-2008, 07:29 AM   #1
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Translating muffins to a loaf

I'm trying to follow this recipe: Apple Cheddar Muffins - Allrecipes but instead of cooking in those paper muffin cases, I'm using a silicon loaf mould thing which of course means that a lot more moisture is retained (smaller surface-area and lower (zero) permeability). The resulting loaf collapses under its own mushy weight and sticks to the plate. I don't want to reduce the (butter)milk quantity so much as the water quantity (i.e. through evaporation). I already hold out on the top layer of cheese until later in the process, when the loaf has formed a crust on top. Would I be well advised to reduce the cooking temperature as well? When it's done, I'll take it out and put it upside down with the loaf mould removed to allow evaporation from all sides.

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Old 05-12-2008, 08:46 AM   #2
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I would decrease your baking temp to 350 degrees and increase the bake time to 60 minutes. This is what I do for quick breads and they come out well.

As far as reducing the buttermilk, I would reduce the oil before I would cut the milk. Most quick bread recipes don't need the oil it seems (if there is adequate liquid from another source, like your buttermilk), it will change the texture a bit but the flavor is still very good.

Good luck!
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Old 05-12-2008, 02:56 PM   #3
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Operation Dry-Cake failed! It was in for about 40 minutes before the crust started to brown (how permeable is that crust to steam?) I added the cheese and left it a further 20. When I turned it over, it fell apart due to uncooked areas in the middle. I will regroup and try again shortly. Suggest 170 C for 50 minutes before adding cheese. Oil was already reduced to 25 ml (half). Will consider reducing milk to 150 ml (75%; depends what I have left).

If the crust is considered permeable, I could cook it uncheesed for the full 60 minutes and then grill it with the cheese in place? Will the silicon mould withstand grilling?

I just had another thought; perhaps covering the top of the loaf during cooking would prevent premature dessication and browning (crust formation). It would probably also reduce the speed of moisture-loss from the rest of the cake. It's difficult to predict the net effect.
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Old 05-12-2008, 04:36 PM   #4
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Are you checking it with a toothpick before you turn it out? 60 minutes is just a starting point. I've had zucchini bread bake for almost 90 minutes because the zucchini was so moist. You just need to watch the top to be sure it's not getting too brown ...

I don't know if I would put the silicon under the broiler (I'm guessing that is what you mean by "grilling"). Try sprinking it on when you get a clean toothpick and leave it in the oven for another 5 minutes for the cheese to melt.

Someone else might have another idea for you ...
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Old 05-18-2008, 11:18 AM   #5
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I reduced the milk to about 180 ml and the temperature to 170 C. I increased the baking time to 60 minutes (limit of crust browness) before adding cheese and melting for a further 5 minutes.

How hard should the cheese set? It's actually quite difficult to cut through with a serrated knife (perhaps time spent between baking and cutting (hours-days) also has an effect).
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