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Old 12-13-2006, 07:30 PM   #11
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Please Note: In my recipe for Sweet Dough....it is 3 packs of dry yeast.
Sorry. Typing error.
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Old 12-13-2006, 07:47 PM   #12
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Aria I'm fairly new at this too, but you can go to your original post and hit edit and make the correction...no harm no foul

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Old 12-13-2006, 09:57 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDP
Aria I'm fairly new at this too, but you can go to your original post and hit edit and make the correction...no harm no foul

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LOL - thanks for the lesson in editing. I did it already not knowing if it would actually get done - I would hate for someone to read the info thinking that was the way to make this.
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Old 12-16-2006, 08:41 PM   #14
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Basic Pizza Dough (follow the directions Homemade Bread Using Your Food Processor
3-1/3 to 4 cups flour
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 tsp.instant yeast
1 cup plus 3 tablespoons water
use cornmeal for the peel or baking sheet
Enough dough for three 10-inch pizzas or focaccia
2-1/2 to 3 hours fermentation Questions?
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Old 01-07-2007, 10:05 AM   #15
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Many long years ago, before my BM I made mine in the processor with great success also. Used my MW to let it rise, no drafts. I had almost forgotten. I may try it again.
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Old 01-07-2007, 01:26 PM   #16
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bevkile....Yes any yeast recipe can be made in your Food Processor. Here is one of my favorite Italian Bread recipes:
1-1/2 cups water (85-105 degree...warm water always with yeast)
1 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon yeast
3-1/2 cups Bread Flour
Put all dry ingredients in your Food Processor...addd warm water. Pulse
45 seconds (or until dough forms a ball) Place in bowl (no grease) cover with plastic wrap 30 minutes.

Roll out shape(place on cookie sheet) cover with plastic let rise 1 hour.

heat 375 degree oven middle rack 25 minutes until golden brown.

(you can check my first thread on Great Homemade Bread Using Your Food Processor). Or ...questions? It is simple and easy and we have Homemade bread...different varieties daily. No store bought.
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Old 01-07-2007, 02:31 PM   #17
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I've been making bread - all kinds of different breads - with my KitchenAid mixer for 11 years without any problems. All kinds of bread - easy as pie, cleanup included. That said, old dogs CAN be taught new tricks & I'll try the food processor method next time around.

However - one question. How do you "proof" your yeast? Or do you just keep your fingers crossed that it's alive? That part I'd find difficult to do as I'd hate to have to toss out an entire load of bread dough because for whatever reason the yeast was bad.
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Old 01-07-2007, 02:34 PM   #18
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I'm enjoying all the information in this thread. Keep it up!
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Old 01-07-2007, 03:56 PM   #19
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Breezy Cooking...I buy my yeast in bulk at a Health Food Store or Farmer's Co-op a large quantity in a plastic container (like l cup tupperware with lid)
and I store in back of my refrigerator. I have had my yeast over l year...no problem. If you want to feel comfortable...test some first.

To be sure you could put a small amount of yeast (1/2 teaspoon) in a glass of warm water and watch it foam? I usually don't use yeast during our summer months in the North East. The yeast sits in my refrigerator and is ready come Fall when I usually bake yeast products. NEVER had bad yeast.
I purchase in a store where Yeast "moves" and it goes from the store fresh,
to my refrigerator.

I have a kitchen aid mixer with a bread hook. The Processor makes BETTER
BREAD for me. Quick EASY....all dry...then warm water...45 sec pulse.

licia, thanks for your comment. I love to bake bread and yeast things and have spent many years learning. And as a College Art Teacher...I enjoy passing on what I have learned over the years to my friends,students and associates.
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Old 01-07-2007, 04:04 PM   #20
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Yes, I guess I would proof mine first. I made one batch of Italian bread once where, in a hurry, I didn't bother proofing the yeast, & even though it was far from the expiration date, my loaves came out fairly flat. I'm sure the water temp was fine, etc., so just think that particular yeast packet was past its prime.

I baked the bread anyway & it did come out tasting good - just more like long narrow foccacia than Italian loaves - lol!!!!!

Since then, I always proof the yeast first.
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