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Old 09-22-2014, 01:38 PM   #1
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Question Bread Not Rise Tall but Wide

While the sourdough was rising, instead of rising the same ratio all around, mine did more width than height. I read a book mentioning about too little salt would cause the condition as mine. What other reasons can they be as well???? Thanks

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Old 09-22-2014, 04:08 PM   #2
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I am not a bread baking expert, but any free form loaves that I have made, usually expand wider than they are tall, especially if the dough is very soft. Come to think of it, so are loaves that I purchase.
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Old 09-22-2014, 04:21 PM   #3
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I make italian bread often, and let the formed loaf rise in my oven for an hour covered, then when i remove the loaf and turn my oven on and bring to temp, my loaf will drop a little when i put the bread in the oven to bake, giving me a loaf a litter wider than high. Sounds like the same problem your having. I don't have an answer, I just deal with it.
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Old 09-22-2014, 04:28 PM   #4
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Old Vine is right - free-form loaves do that. If you want a different shape, you can put it in a loaf pan to bake.
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Old 09-22-2014, 05:45 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chueh View Post
While the sourdough was rising, instead of rising the same ratio all around, mine did more width than height. I read a book mentioning about too little salt would cause the condition as mine. What other reasons can they be as well???? Thanks
If the dough is to soft (ie too much liquid in the mix) it will do this.
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Old 09-22-2014, 08:57 PM   #6
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Agreed. That's almost certainly the problem. Wet dough may get by in a pan, but freeform loaves need more firm dough or a basket to rise in.

Salt plays multiple roles in bread dough and is often said to retard yeast action, but careful studies suggest the amount of salt has little effect on yeast but does tighten the gluten structure, which slows rising. But the other functions, taste and preservation are more significant.
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Old 09-24-2014, 01:55 AM   #7
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I prove mine in a basket, but even a colander lined with a well floured cloth will do. This shapes the dough, and if you think that the dough is too soft, after it has proved, place it covered in the fridge for 30mins to stiffen the dough. Remove it and lace it immediately into the heated oven. I was told this by a well known baker, though I have never needed to do it. If in doubt, give it a try. Ordinary yeast free form cobs shouldn't need this, but this is from the book "The Pink Whisk to Breadmaking" by Ruth Clemens.

5 Flatten the dough into a rough circle. Taking the outside edge of the dough fold it in to the middle and work in this way all around the outside edge until you get back to where you started and can fold in no more! 6 Flip the dough over so that the seam is underneath. Gently cup your hands around the ball of dough and start to tighten the dough again, moving your hands down and underneath it, repeating until the dough feels tight like a coiled spring. Repeat the tightening action, gently encouraging the dough into a round shape, all the time keeping the seam underneath. The shaping is important in getting a free- form loaf to rise upwards and keep its shape rather than flowing outwards. 7 Set the loaf onto a baking sheet lined with baking.

Give this a try, hope it works.


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Old 10-05-2014, 07:53 PM   #8
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Thank you all. Wonderful replies
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