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Old 06-11-2016, 11:56 AM   #1
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First attempt at sourdough....ever!

My first attempt at a sourdough was not a scientific affair. It was pretty much a "this seems right, that looks ok" metho, which I actually prefer. The result is below:



I cooked it inside an earthenware casserole dis, hoping for a better crust, but my crust was nowhere near as good as I have made without one. Either I'm doing it wrong, or all this talk of steam inside a dutch oven/casserole dish is not all it's cracked up to be (I'd guess the former!)


Either way, I think it came out rather well for my first attempt. Any tips of making it taste a little more sour, though? I had a very wet dough, which apparently not very conducive to the production of acids. Could that be the problem?

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Old 06-11-2016, 12:03 PM   #2
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Did you make a starter and let it sit out on the counter for several days?
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Old 06-11-2016, 12:42 PM   #3
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I made the started on Tuesday and I took a portion of it yesterday evening and fed it up. It was nice and bubbly this morning when I started using it. I didn't want the acid production to kill off the yeast, but I would also like it a bit more sour. It seems like a fine balance.
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Old 06-11-2016, 12:49 PM   #4
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Without knowing what recipe you are following, I think you'll get better results with a cast iron dutch oven than an earthenware casserole dish. If you are following the standard dutch oven (no knead) recipe, I would suggest putting the dough in the refrigerator for at least a few days after the initial 18 hour rise to allow it to develop more flavor. Or are you trying to make sourdough where you keep the starter alive for years?
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Old 06-11-2016, 01:03 PM   #5
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18 hours? Haha, I did 2 hours! Will 18 hours not kill off the yeast? I did read somewhere that 18 hours was considered extremely long.

You're right in that I didn't knead anything as such. I just folded it in my big mixing bowl every 15mins or so initially, then let it rest.
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Old 06-11-2016, 01:13 PM   #6
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You can freeze unbaked yeast products. Heck, I store my yeast in the freezer.
If it has risen, you can just take it out of the fridge and bake.
Or if not, when you take it out of the fridge, shape, let rise then bake.
The cold just slows the yeast down, it doesn't kill it.
Now overheating the yeast will kill it.
I even have several recipes for overnight or 24 hour rolls.
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Old 06-11-2016, 01:18 PM   #7
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This might help

No-Knead Bread Recipe - NYT Cooking

Sourdough No-Knead Bread Recipe - NYT Cooking

Mr. Google can provide some help as well.
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Old 06-11-2016, 01:30 PM   #8
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Visit the King Arthur Flour web site. They have a lot of useful information concerning baking sourdough bread
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Old 06-11-2016, 02:09 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suthseaxa View Post
18 hours? Haha, I did 2 hours! Will 18 hours not kill off the yeast? I did read somewhere that 18 hours was considered extremely long.

You're right in that I didn't knead anything as such. I just folded it in my big mixing bowl every 15mins or so initially, then let it rest.
The no-knead recipe tenspeed is referring to is a specific method for making fresh bread without having to knead it. The dough can be kept in the fridge for up to two weeks and the flavor and aroma will continue to improve during that time.
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Old 06-12-2016, 02:30 AM   #10
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[QUOTE=Suthseax Any tips of making it taste a little more sour, though? I had a very wet dough, which apparently not very conducive to the production of acids. Could that be the problem?[/QUOTE]

Great first result. I am with Sir Loin, who I also think I know perhaps from the King Arthur flour fourums (I would tout them as the best place to learn about sourdough)

The acid and 'sour' you seek comes with time. You, given those big holes, have some hella active yeasties. Sourdough is more art than artifice, but if you want to calm them down to a acid tasting loaf, you have to give it time.

For me a sourdough bread loaf is a two day thing. I take a cup of starter (8.5 oz) and three cups of flour (12.75), with 12 oz water) and let that rise for four hours.

That then gets put in the fridge and left for 12 hours, or overnight.

Add about 8.5 oz of flour, 1 tbsp of honey or maple syrup, 2 1/4 tsp salt.

Let rise five hours.

break down into loaves, let rise 2-3 hours

Then you are ready to bake. 350 for a half hour.

The multiple risings are designed to maximize the better sourdough bacteria and yeast partnership.

It makes a sour sourdough. YMMV, hope it works for you.

Cheers,

T
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