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Old 02-13-2009, 02:59 PM   #1
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Red face ISO Sour dough bread help

I have found a recipe for the starter but the preparation for the bread was not clear. Do any of you got a recipe that works?

At leaste for the bread.

Here is th recipie it gave me:

1 package of dry yeast
1/2 cup of warm water
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon of suger or honey

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Old 02-14-2009, 12:35 AM   #2
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I recently purchased a starter from King Arthur Flour and had pretty good results with it.

To prep I do the following.
Prior to making the bread I discard half the starter and add 1/2 cup water 1 cup flour.
Next let it sit out for about half a day.
This gets the starter nice and bubbly.

Use whatever the recipe calls for in regards to starter and feed the remainder of the starter with 1/2 cup of water and 1 cup flour.

King Arthur (where I bought my starter from) suggests the following recipe.
1 cup starter
1 1/2 cup warm water
2 1/2 tsp. salt
1 tbsp. sugar
2 tsp. instant yeast
5 cups unbleached all purpose flour

combine the ingredients and let it rise until doubled ~ 90 mins

divide the dough into 2 halves. Cover and let rise on a parchment paper lined cookie sheet. ~ 60 mins. Slash the tops and bake at 425 deg. for 30 mins.

I tried baking on the pizza stone and burned the bottom of the bread. I only tried this because I am used to baking my breads at 500+ degrees and this recipe I found was a little low.

I baked the 2nd loaf on one of my perforated curved bread trays (like what subway uses) and 500 degrees and it came out perfect.

Here is a pic of my last sourdough bread.
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Old 02-14-2009, 03:56 AM   #3
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it's tricky.........you've got to control the environment............I've tried in KZ and there's too much junk in the air........from what I've read it's best to get a good commercial sourdough yeast starter....that can be ordered online...be sure to look at the expiration dates if your local specialty stores carry it, though...........the others who have posted so far look great, too...........good luck
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Old 02-14-2009, 06:42 AM   #4
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This is my tried and true recipe for sourdough bread:
1/2 cup starter
3/4 luke warm water
1 T oil
1 T sugar
1 t salt
3 cups flour
2 t yeast
(Makes about a 1 1/2 pound loaf)

I cheat and use a bread machine. I need it twice or sometimes three times to get a thicker crust.

ExPatGirl is right. The sourdough you get will depend on your location. That delicious sourdough bread from San Francisco is unique to that area. But I have found any sourdough bread (if not contaminated) is better than just plain white French bread.
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Old 03-06-2009, 10:08 PM   #5
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An easy and fast way to create a sourdough starter is not to use commercial yeast. Find some grapes, and spin them in the food processor, combine this with a cup of flour and a cup of water. Let sit for 2 days until it starts to bubble. You may have to be patient, it may take longer, but check every day and when you start to notice a sour smell, feed with another cup of flour and another cup of water. This works best with Rye flour, but of course you cant make bread with only Rye, so after it ferments continue with a good sour rye recipe that you can find in any bread book.

If you are using that much yeast, you are not really creating a sour starter, commercial yeast works differently than airborn, bacteria producing yeast live on the skins of many fruits, thats why grapes work, other fruits will as well, whey also will ferment flour and water nicely.
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Old 03-07-2009, 01:13 AM   #6
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Hey, Dina, will certainly give this a try.......sure can't hurt only you can't get rye flour here (used to but not anymore) so I'll see how it does with regular flour.........
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Old 03-07-2009, 05:54 AM   #7
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Haven't found Rye here in Panamá either. I love sourdough bread with caraway seeds!
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:39 AM   #8
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I have a Finnish sourdough rye bread recipe with caraway and orange zest.......oh, so yummo
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:44 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GHPoe View Post
I recently purchased a starter from King Arthur Flour and had pretty good results with it.

To prep I do the following.
Prior to making the bread I discard half the starter and add 1/2 cup water 1 cup flour.
Next let it sit out for about half a day.
This gets the starter nice and bubbly.

Use whatever the recipe calls for in regards to starter and feed the remainder of the starter with 1/2 cup of water and 1 cup flour.

King Arthur (where I bought my starter from) suggests the following recipe.
1 cup starter
1 1/2 cup warm water
2 1/2 tsp. salt
1 tbsp. sugar
2 tsp. instant yeast
5 cups unbleached all purpose flour

combine the ingredients and let it rise until doubled ~ 90 mins

divide the dough into 2 halves. Cover and let rise on a parchment paper lined cookie sheet. ~ 60 mins. Slash the tops and bake at 425 deg. for 30 mins.

I tried baking on the pizza stone and burned the bottom of the bread. I only tried this because I am used to baking my breads at 500+ degrees and this recipe I found was a little low.

I baked the 2nd loaf on one of my perforated curved bread trays (like what subway uses) and 500 degrees and it came out perfect.

Here is a pic of my last sourdough bread.
That looks delicious, GH!!! Isn't it a great feeling?? And the King Arthur people are wonderful to send emails to......they'll answer your questions within a day or two and will give permission to publish their recipes as long as you give them credit which I have.....I still think that their sandwich bread is amazing..........
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Old 03-07-2009, 08:27 AM   #10
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Tex, where are you now? Texas or Kazakhastan? Ice fishing? Where. Too cold for me.

But I think I will add some lemon zest to my next attempt at sourdough rye bread. I love it when I can double knead and get a nice thicky, chewy, crunchy crust.
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