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Old 10-19-2009, 08:21 AM   #21
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At what point in the starter process during the several weeks to make starter does it go to the fridge?
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Old 10-19-2009, 08:56 AM   #22
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It doesn't take several weeks to make a starter. If it has been bubbling for a week, it is ready for baking. Thereafter, you should put it in the frig to make it go into hibernation. Only put your starter out and let it get to room temperature when you are going to use it for baking. If it is out at room temperature, you should use it, then feed it and stir it thoroughly. Little clumps of dough are not a problem.
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Old 10-23-2009, 10:22 PM   #23
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Tweeking my starter to improve the flavor?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arky View Post
the ratio of a starter is 2 parts flour to 1 part water (filtered or bottled water - NO CHLORINE. It will kill or degrade your yeast.)...

One more thing - as your starter matures (ages) it will grow stronger and develop a flavor all its own - one that can be really, really good and unique just to you and your area.
I'm strictly pancakes. I've had my starter for at least 2 years. Never added anything but flour and tap water. Do you add only filtered/bottled water forever?

Also, I'm not that impressed with the taste of my sourdough starter. Seems a little strong, so I usually put 1/2 c flour with 1 1/2 c starter in my pancakes to make it a little milder. Is there any standard feeding formula I should be using to enhance the flavor of my starter?
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Old 10-24-2009, 08:38 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by D0UGHBOY View Post
I'm strictly pancakes. I've had my starter for at least 2 years. Never added anything but flour and tap water. Do you add only filtered/bottled water forever?

Also, I'm not that impressed with the taste of my sourdough starter. Seems a little strong, so I usually put 1/2 c flour with 1 1/2 c starter in my pancakes to make it a little milder. Is there any standard feeding formula I should be using to enhance the flavor of my starter?

Perhaps the reason you're not impressed with the flavor of your starter is because you're using just tap water? (Just a little tease.) Actually, the flavor is due to the type of wild yeast in your starter and generally can't be altered without importing a yeast from some other location. Also, only 1 cup of sour dough starter is added to any recipe, bread or batter, replacing one of the cups of flour called for in the recipe. It's not meant to be a "batter" by itself. That may be the reason the flavor seems so strong.

I wish you luck with your baking.
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Old 10-24-2009, 03:41 PM   #25
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Thanks for this info on sour dough starter. Sour dough bread is one of my favorite breads.
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Old 10-24-2009, 03:55 PM   #26
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Hi everyone, I have a question on sour dough starters?

Would this work for a very basic sour dough starter, 1 cup water, 1 cup flour, 1 tablespoon salt, 1 tablespoon of suger, 1 packet dry yeast to jump start it?
Personally, I think your starter recipe is off a little. Been a while since I had a starter "cooking" and did not remember exactly what formula I used so I went back and reviewed my DO cookbooks. There are a variety of recipes so I doubt you can go wrong with whatever you use.....within reason.

Most of the recipes in my books called for a 1:1 (by volume) mix of water and flour to start and the same ratio to replenish. One of the recipes called for replenishing with milk or water.

Some called for sugar and some did not. One (from my bible, the International Dutch Oven Society) called for honey.

I think the recipe you posted has way too much salt. That much might even stunt or kill the yeast. All of the recipes that used salt called for 1 tsp. of salt with 2 cups of flour and 2 cups of water.

You can just let the starter sit out, uncovered and it will pick up wild yeast spores from the air (a slow process) or if you are in a hurry, you can use commercial dried yeast. I have read that you can purchase packets of dried wild yeast on the Internet. It is claimed that you get a different taste with the wild yeast; but I have never done that so can't comment.

One thing that has not been emphasized is storage and mixing. You want to avoid any metal in either the container or the utensils. Don't mix your brew with metal spoons and do not store in a metal container. Glass, ceramic or plastic will be just fine; but watch out for a metal lid on a glass jar.

Good luck and enjoy!!!
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Old 10-24-2009, 06:45 PM   #27
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Congrats to everyone here - I'm not sure I could get past the idea of 'feeding'... lol
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