"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Sourdoughs
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-29-2013, 08:16 PM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Posts: 15
Hi All, I need Help.

I've cultured a sour dough starter for 8 days. I've been feeding it daily. The container that i'm using is almost full and I took out 2 x 1/3 cup of starter and added 3 x 1/3 cup of bread flour and 2 tsp of salt. I've mixed it together and left it out to rise. After more than 10 hrs the dough still remains the same. Can any one help ? TQ
__________________

__________________
kowkl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2013, 12:14 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,064
Quote:
Originally Posted by kowkl View Post
Hi All, I need Help.

I've cultured a sour dough starter for 8 days. I've been feeding it daily. The container that i'm using is almost full and I took out 2 x 1/3 cup of starter and added 3 x 1/3 cup of bread flour and 2 tsp of salt. I've mixed it together and left it out to rise. After more than 10 hrs the dough still remains the same. Can any one help ? TQ
Where did you leave it to rise? It needs warmth to rise. If your oven has a light in it, turn the light on and put your dough in there. The bulb will give off just enough heat to help the dough rise. If you have no light in your oven, turn your oven on to warm or no higher than 200ºF. Leave it on for about one minute. Just long enough to make the oven warm. Then place your dough in. Keep the door closed and let the warmth of your oven do its job.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2013, 11:31 PM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Posts: 15
Addie,

I don't think it's the temperature coz I'm living in a tropical country. Do you think it's the dough and it's not strong enough yet ? Can you share some tips on how we know if our sour dough is ready for bread making. Should the sour dough should be like a dough(dry) or watery? TQ
__________________
kowkl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 12:17 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,064
Quote:
Originally Posted by kowkl View Post
Addie,

I don't think it's the temperature coz I'm living in a tropical country. Do you think it's the dough and it's not strong enough yet ? Can you share some tips on how we know if our sour dough is ready for bread making. Should the sour dough should be like a dough(dry) or watery? TQ
It should be a soft dough and a little sticky. Your starter should be on the liquidy side. And your dough needs some heat to rise even if you live in a tropical area. Feel the container of the outside. Does it feel warm to the touch? Warmer than your house? What does your starter look like. Does it have bubbles on top and throughout? Does it smell sour? It should have a strong yeasty odor. Depending on where you live, it can take up to a month to develop the wild yeast from the air. You have to feed it every day. Flour and water. A starter is a live being. It has to be fed regularly.

Anyone else have anything to add? Chime in.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 08:07 PM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Posts: 15
http://img37.imageshack.us/img37/741/20130131204907.jpg

My dough looks something like this after feeding it with wholemeal flour at night. I think it went to sleep because the temp around my kitchen (outdoor) is not warm enough. During the night it tends to cool down even more. I'll try moving it back inside my house. The outside of the container (plastic) is cool this morning and there was absents of bubbles when I look at it this morning.

After feed it with wholewheat flour this morning the bubbles are present again (similar to pic). Can I use it to make bread now ? Thanks for your help or any help.
__________________
kowkl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 11:01 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Dip your little finger into it and have a taste. Is it sour tasting? If the answer is yes, then that, along with the bubbles tells you that the yeast is alive and growing. As it feeds an the starches, the yeast gives off an acid, which makes the starter taste sour. It also produces CO2, which produces the bubbles.

If the starter isn't sour yet, then you need to let it sit a while longer. The yeast is alive, which you can tell from the bubbles, but hasn't reproduced enough yet to create the number of little yeast critters to make the dough sour, or leaven you bread. When you add it to the bread, it has to be mixed in thoroughly. And then, know that sour dough takes longer to rise than does dough made with commercial yeast strains. But, it will rise, and give you that wonderful sourdough flavor you are looking for. Obviously, heat will help. The dough should be kept at about 110 degrees for fastest action. Much more than that will kill the yeast.

A trick I often use is to fill my sink with 120' water, then set my dough bowl into the sink. The water cools rapidly enough so as not to overheat the dough, but transfers enough heat energy into the dough as to jump-start the action. After the dough is warm, place it in a warm location, covered of course.

Hope that helps.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 11:50 PM   #17
Master Chef
 
FrankZ's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 9,633
Quote:
Originally Posted by kowkl View Post
Hi All, I need Help.

I've cultured a sour dough starter for 8 days. I've been feeding it daily. The container that i'm using is almost full and I took out 2 x 1/3 cup of starter and added 3 x 1/3 cup of bread flour and 2 tsp of salt. I've mixed it together and left it out to rise. After more than 10 hrs the dough still remains the same. Can any one help ? TQ

The first question that needs to be asked is did the starter double itself between feedings? Was it able to do that in 7 to 10 hours? If not you are not going to leaven bread.

How were you feeding? What ratio? How often? What sort of temperature are you letting the starter work in?
__________________
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
FrankZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 10:12 AM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Posts: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
The first question that needs to be asked is did the starter double itself between feedings? Was it able to do that in 7 to 10 hours? If not you are not going to leaven bread.

How were you feeding? What ratio? How often? What sort of temperature are you letting the starter work in?
No it didn't double. Could it be coz my dough is watery?
Feeding daily - 2 x 1/3 cup of normal flour & 1/3 cup filtered water.
Temp around 32°c.

I've been going without bread for 2 weeks while waiting for this. Help !!!!!
__________________
kowkl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 10:23 AM   #19
Master Chef
 
FrankZ's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 9,633
If it can't double itself it can't raise bread.

There is a thread around here about starters but basically mine started as 50g flour and 50g water. Every feed I did I discard down to 50g of starter and add 50g water and 50g flour (a 1:1:1 ratio).

When I get ready to bake I do a feeding at 75g on the 1:1:1 about 8 hours before I think I need it.

It absolutely has to double to do you any good. If you starter is on the counter plan on 12 hours between feeding. When mine is in the fridge I usually plan 36 hours out (3 feeds) before I get to the bake (another 8 hours) so about 44 hours ahead of my bake I pull it out of the fridge.
__________________
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
FrankZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 10:16 PM   #20
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Posts: 15
I've finally got my sour dough to work. I think it's because earlier my dough is not matured enough and that's why it's not rising. While I was mixing the dough last night, the sour smell from the dough is strong and this morning it has already rised 2 x it's original size. I'll bake it tonight and will upload the pic once it's done.

TQ
__________________

__________________
kowkl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.