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Old 01-18-2014, 01:00 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Due to newly wonky thermostat on our oven, I can't tell you what temperature we used. The oven was set to 400F. Ten minutes made them look and taste like pizza. I would check sooner.
Thanks!
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Old 01-18-2014, 07:34 PM   #22
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My little pizza experiment worked pretty well.

I made two, one for dinner and one for breakfast. A slice of cold pizza is my all time favorite breakfast, especially if it sits out on the kitchen counter all night! Those were the days!

The first one I laid the flat bread on a tray and topped it, the second one I put the round of flat bread into a six inch cast iron skillet so it came up the sides of the skillet and then topped it. Both came out fine after 10 minutes in a preheated 450 degree oven.

Now I'm thinking that using them in the skillet might be a good way to make a breakfast pizza/quiche. An egg beaten with a splash of milk, some cheese and a few odds and ends from fridge would be enough to fill the flat bread. I would estimate that it will hold about 1/2 cup. We'll see!
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Old 01-31-2014, 11:50 AM   #23
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Hi GA H.C. , the "flatbread" in Itlay it's called "piadina", it is easy to prepare at home with 500g of 00 flour, 75 grams of lard and just a little bit of baking soda, salt and water; it is enough to for 4 tortillas and it is more good than ready!
If you want unleavened bread does not put salt.
The dough has to rest for half an hour, but it is very good and you can fill with whatever you have in the fredge !
More good one to try is the with tomatoes, ham and chees!!
Sorry for my english !!
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Old 02-01-2014, 02:26 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by DianaP81 View Post
Hi GA H.C. , the "flatbread" in Itlay it's called "piadina", it is easy to prepare at home with 500g of 00 flour, 75 grams of lard and just a little bit of baking soda, salt and water; it is enough to for 4 tortillas and it is more good than ready!
If you want unleavened bread does not put salt.
The dough has to rest for half an hour, but it is very good and you can fill with whatever you have in the fredge !
More good one to try is the with tomatoes, ham and chees!!
Sorry for my english !!
Nothing wrong with your English. We get the message very clearly. At least you try with English. We don't try with Italian.
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Old 02-01-2014, 07:51 AM   #25
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Thank you Addy, I try learn!
The Italian is more difficult, but we Italians are donkeys with languages!!!
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Old 02-01-2014, 09:57 AM   #26
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Thank you Addy, I try learn!
The Italian is more difficult, but we Italians are donkeys with languages!!!
I think you did great! I just wish I could speak/write Italian as well.
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Old 02-01-2014, 04:14 PM   #27
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I write with help of translator because I do not speak English!I'm trying to learn!
if you want to try, I will help you with italian write
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Old 02-01-2014, 05:56 PM   #28
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I write with help of translator because I do not speak English!I'm trying to learn!
if you want to try, I will help you with italian write
That's so kind----- but there's a saying here "You Can't Teach an Old Dog New Tricks!"

But maybe a few phrases?

A question------Do you think pizza originated in Italy? I know that here in the States it's almost our national food.
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Old 02-01-2014, 06:26 PM   #29
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The pizza has a long history , complex and uncertain. The first written records of the word " pizza " dates back to Vulgar Latin (ie the mother tongue of Italian) of Gaeta in 997 (I live 20 miles from Gaeta) and later in other Italian cities such as Rome , L'Aquila , Pesaro . Later, in the sixteenth century in Naples to a flat bread was given the name of pizza. According to tradition, in June, 1889, to honor the Queen of Italy, Margherita of Savoy, the chef Raffaele Esposito created the "Pizza Margherita", a pizza topped with tomatoes, mozzarella and basil to represent the colors of the Italian flag.
In Italy , as well as the Neapolitan pizza there is also a Roman pizza more like a stuffed bread and " focaccia " , a pizza that is not stuffed !
The pizza made ​​its first appearance in the United States with the arrival of Italian immigrants in the late nineteenth century. It was certainly the case in cities with large Italian populations , such as San Francisco, Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia where pizza was first sold on the streets of Italian neighborhoods . In the late nineteenth century Chicago for example , pizza was introduced by a peddler who walked up and down Taylor Street with a washtub of pizzas on his head. This was the traditional way pizza was sold in Naples , in copper cylinders with handles on the sides and a lid on it to keep the pizzas warm . It was not long before the little cafes and grocery stores would start to deliver the pizzas to their Italian-American community .

I'm sorry if I spoke too....!!!

I'm available to help you with a few words in Italian...
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Old 02-02-2014, 04:33 PM   #30
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Today I tried a tart I saw on an old Jacques Pepin show.

The tart on the show used a tortilla, I used a Sahara whole wheat pita.

I sprinkled a tablespoon of sugar on a baking sheet, put the pita on top of the sugar. I peeled and sliced a granny smith apple and arranged the slices on the pita like the overlapping spokes of a wheel. I sprinkled a tablespoon of sugar on the apple slices and dotted them with a tablespoon of cold butter cut in little slivers. I baked the tart in a 400 degree oven for 20 minutes. When I removed it from the oven I placed it on a dessert plate that had been sprinkled with a few almond slivers, to prevent the caramelized bottom of the tart from sticking to the plate. I glazed the tart with a tablespoon of orange marmalade that had been heated in the microwave, scattered a few more almond slivers on the top and waited for it to cool.

It looked wonderful, but I really did not expect it to taste like a "real" dessert. Boy was I wrong, the bottom of the pita pocket had caramelized and was crispy, the apples were soft, it tasted like it came from a pastry shop! All it needed was a dollop of sour cream or vanilla ice cream to top it off!
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