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Old 04-24-2011, 09:58 AM   #1
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Flour for making pizza

Hi, I've recently started making my own pizza dough and up until now, I've been using pre-made pizza base mix, which has all of the flour, salt, yeast etc already mixed, just requiring the addition of olive oil and warm water.

I'm intrigued now and wish to make my own dough from scratch. I found a recipe on the internet for pizza dough by Jamie Oliver:

pizza dough | Pizza | Recipes | Jamie Oliver (UK)

I have some questions over the flour though because I am a little confused.
I really want to try making it with the Tipo '00 flour and Semolina flour that he mentions, rather than strong white flour but I'm having trouble understanding what I need to get. I've tried several different supermarkets local to me including Tesco, Morrisons, Asda and even Sainsbury's (for whom Jamie Oliver appears in their TV adverts).

Firstly, I cannot find Semolina flour anywhere, let alone find anyone who has heard of it. I don't have any specialist Italian food shops locally so I am restricted to what the supermarkets offer. From what I understand, Semolina is the hard part of durum wheat. Is this correct?

Secondly, the Tipo '00 flour: What does the Tipo bit mean? I understand that the '00 bit is how fine the flour is, but I cannot find any '00 flour called Tipo?
I have managed to find some 'Sainsbury's Taste the Difference' '00 grade pasta flour with Durum.

On the pack, it reads:

"Specially created for making satin-smooth pasta, our doppio zero flour is a supremely fine blend of high-protein white flour milled from the centre of the grain. We mix it with authentic durum wheat for a buttery, typically Italian colour"

Is this ok for making pizza or is this strictly pasta flour?
I assume the durum content is similar to adding semolina flour?

Does the protein content affect the elasticity of the dough much? if I was to use this, would it be best to mix it with some strong white flour, or would that ruin the '00 qualities of the flour?

I really want to have a go at making an authentic dough, but the ingredients I have access to are a little limited.

Thanks in advance for any help.

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Old 04-24-2011, 10:08 AM   #2
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The double zero durum blend should work fine.
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:09 AM   #3
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Perhaps you can find the flours you are looking for here.
They have a great help line, too.
King Arthur Flour home page
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:11 AM   #4
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Translated from Italian, tipo = type. So you're looking for type 00 flour. The 00 is the only important part.

00 is a type of flour used in pasta making but that does not mean it's only good for pasta.

You should be able to find all you need here: King Arthur Flour home page
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:38 AM   #5
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Hi Snoopy and welcome to DC.

You don't say where you are, but based on your list of local grocery stores, I am going to guess GB. We do have members here from GB, but most of us are from North America.

I have heard of, but am not familiar with tipo 00 flour, so I googled it. This page was interesting: Italian Tipo “00″ Flour Perfect for Pizza? | KitchenBoy

It seems that tipo 00 could be hard (strong) or soft flour, but it is definitely finely milled.

Maybe some of our Brit members can be of help in locating the right kind of tipo 00.
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:42 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Translated from Italian, tipo = type. So you're looking for type 00 flour. The 00 is the only important part.

00 is a type of flour used in pasta making but that does not mean it's only good for pasta.

You should be able to find all you need here: King Arthur Flour home page
Some might say, translated to Italian, King Arthur Flour = troppo caro.
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:43 AM   #7
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Yes, OP is in GB...as ironic as it may seem...King Arthur Flour doesn't ship there.
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Old 04-24-2011, 11:42 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Yes, OP is in GB...as ironic as it may seem...King Arthur Flour doesn't ship there.


That is ironic.


(and yet another reason why listing a general location is important )
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Old 04-24-2011, 03:55 PM   #9
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I have to say - the recipe you found looks delicious but overly complicated.

I make pizza dough almost every week (pizza and a movie night at my house) and here's what I do:

In stand mixer:

Flour
Salt
SAF yeast (this is the kind you don't have to rehydrate)

Hot tap water
2 T Olive oil

Mix hot water and oil into a tall glass and then slowly add to flour mixture while the mixer is running on low-ish. I slowly turn up the mixer speed until the dough has come together and then then let it go a minute or two longer.

I let the dough rise in the bowl, punching it down as needed until I'm ready to use it. A longer rise is better but I have done this in as little as an hour.

I noted that there was sugar in Olivers recipe but I'm not sure why you would want sugar in your pizza dough.
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Old 04-24-2011, 04:18 PM   #10
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A mix ratio that I have used successfully for years is:

5 Parts Bread flour (High Gluten Flour)
3 Parts All Purpose (Moderate Gluten Flour)
2 Parts Cake Flour (Low Gluten Flour)

For mine, I measure in ounces, giving me 10 ounces of flour which is enough for two medium size pizza doughs. For pizzas, the brand is unimportant. The proofing process (yeast aging and rising) has more to do with the flavor than the brand of flour. Salt , olive oil and perhaps a touch of sweetener and any spices add flavor.
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