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Old 09-09-2015, 10:41 AM   #1
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Making pizza dough, thin and crispy

I have followed many pizza dough recipe's, and all turn out good, but I want thin and crispy, with the addition of yeast, it will always rise, and keep rising. I have tried using less and less yeast. I am assuming I have to add yeast, to get a good tasting dough. When I make it, I let it rise, punch it down, but it keeps rising, every time i punch it down. Any comments or suggestions. I just want thin and crispy pizza.

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Old 09-09-2015, 11:04 AM   #2
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Not sure from your description. You could try using less dough and stretching it thinner.
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:27 AM   #3
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a common practice to let the dough rise only once - punch it down - make it flat - top&bake.....

now, as to making it flat, there are several approaches which can affect thickness.

- the classic thrown pizza. recommended only for the experienced (g)
- the usual 'roll it out'
- the press it into shape with your fingers, do not roll....

one debate is that rolling it deflates the dough - drives the air pockets out and those bubbles are desirable.....which on a quest for thin, might not be your goal.

if you're going to roll it, I recommend a 'French' style pin - i.e. tapered. the conic shape 'self-steers' into a round - the cylindrical pin shape takes a little more care to get 'round' versus odder shapes - but I did it that way for years.

obviously the oven should be preheated, roll the dough, top it and directly into the upper part of the oven. the dough will not rise much from what you rolled out.

the other trick is to have the right amount of dough for the size of the pizza - too much dough volume rolled to the diameter will be thicker. one can of course continue to roll it thinner and just cut off the bits that hang over.

the crispy factor - bake on a pre-heated stone or plate - hot as you oven will go. mine goes to 500'F - however if I keep it at that temp I get some burning before it is fully cooked - so I knock the temp back to 450'F when the pie goes in the oven.

my tomato sauce - I prefer thick stewed tomato vs. a smooth sauce - is hot when it goes on the dough....

here's one sometimes overlooked in the crispy camp: when the bake is finished, remove the pie, slide it off the parchment, if you use that, I do - onto a wire cake rack or grate or anything but a smooth flat surface. the dough is still steaming when it comes out, and if set on a solid surface, the steam soggies the bottom. I give it 5 minutes on the rack, then to a cutting board. some people around here have nearly lost fingers because they can't wait for me to finish cutting . . .

and as the pix demonstrates, some ovens need a rotation mid-way. the crush on this side is a bit not browned enough, the 'backside' was perfect.
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:29 AM   #4
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Joy of Cooking page 752/3 has the recipe I follow BUT I add about 1/4C of 'high gluten flour to make the dough really stretchy. After I roll out the rounds and they have rested a bit I bake them on a hot pizza stone. The rounds will bubble up dramatically when they first go onto the stone. I just flatten out the air pockets. I flip them once and remove from the oven. I usually make about six medium size pizzas. By double sided baking them they end up very thin and crisp. Not broken glass crisp though. They can cool on the counter until I build each one then into the oven. The heat has been turned down so the bottom doesn't scorch. When the toppings are nice and bubbly they are ready to eat.
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Old 09-09-2015, 01:11 PM   #5
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I use both the roll-out and stretch methods, start with stretching and finish with rolling to get it nice and thin. The crust then goes out to the grill immediately to get cooked lightly on both sides. We pre-cook however many crusts we are making then top and finish cooking on the grill.

We do the same thing if we cook in the oven. Crank the oven up as high as possible.

Much prefer grilled with a wood fire though. Temp gets up to the mid to high 600s in the BGE, pegs the gauge on the Weber so not really sure how hot there. As close to a wood burning pizza oven you can get without actually having one.

As long as you cook immediately after rolling/shaping the dough you won't get much of a rise, if at all if you cook it at high temps.
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Old 09-09-2015, 01:40 PM   #6
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I'd recommend using usual amount of yeast, but do not let it rise. Mix, roll out, stretch and bake.
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Old 09-09-2015, 01:58 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
I'd recommend using usual amount of yeast, but do not let it rise. Mix, roll out, stretch and bake.
I don't think I'd do that. You need to let it rise at least once to develop flavor in the dough. A lot of recipes let it rise overnight in the fridge. I've also noted quite a few pizza joints on shows like Diners, Drive-ins and Dives say they let it sit overnight but I don't think any of them use it without at least 1 rise.
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Old 09-09-2015, 05:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
I don't think I'd do that. You need to let it rise at least once to develop flavor in the dough. A lot of recipes let it rise overnight in the fridge. I've also noted quite a few pizza joints on shows like Diners, Drive-ins and Dives say they let it sit overnight but I don't think any of them use it without at least 1 rise.

You might be right, but have to try something.


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Old 09-09-2015, 11:26 PM   #9
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Rolling it thin, then placing it on a preheated pizza stone works for me no matter which dough Im using.
The heat from the stone immediately crisps up the crust. Kinda sets it at the thickness its put in, allows little time to rise anymore.
Dont overload with sauce, or can become soggy.
Gotta watch closely, cooks quick and can easily burn.
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Old 09-10-2015, 08:35 AM   #10
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Thanks everyone for the great tips and advise, now I have a lot more to work with.
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