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Old 09-09-2012, 04:34 PM   #51
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It is not even patience, I just am not good at planing.
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Old 09-12-2012, 08:34 PM   #52
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You mean planning to actually make the dough?
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Old 09-13-2012, 11:59 AM   #53
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Yeah, I guess.
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Old 06-15-2018, 09:23 AM   #54
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Reviving this thread with tears in my eyes

I didn’t want to start a new thread since this one already exists.

I’m trying very hard to make an iconic New York style pizza. I’m aware of the limitations of a home Kitchen that I face, but I’m also pretty well studied in how to overcome those limitations.

The reason that I have tears in my eyes is because I made my dough and put it in the fridge for its long, slow rise. Overnight (or more exactly, 24 hours), and the dough had risen. Way too much, in my opinion, but I was advised by the recipe I was following that the next day, the dough would be even better. Well, it’s the morning of that third day, and the dough has cratered, leading me to believe that the yeast is exhausted.

I’m also confused. Every recipe I read seems to have conflicting instructions: which flour to use, how much yeast to use, using a sponge or not, when to add the oil, sugar or no sugar. The list of discrepancies and differences between recipes goes on and on!

My oven runs hot. At least 25F, but I don’t have an oven thermometer to check exactly. I do have a stone, but depending on the recipe, it should be placed 1) at or near the bottom of the oven, near the heating coil, 2) near the center somewhere, or 3) just under the broiler (this particular recipe suggests preheating the stone for an hour, placing it 6” from the broiler, and cooking the pizza with the combined heat from the stone, and the broiler to cook the top. ????)

And what flour? Italian 00 flour? AP flour? Bread flour? I’ve seen recipes that call for each, and one that actually recommends AP flour with gluten added! So which flour, and which proofing technique, will give me that iconic, foldable thin crust that defines NY pizza?

Mainly though, I’m concerned about my cratered dough. I just checked it again, and the crater seems to be filling up a little. Should I proceed with the pizza this afternoon, or just relegate it to a pound of bread crumbs and not waste the sauce and cheese?
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Old 06-15-2018, 10:01 AM   #55
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This recipe is for a stand mixer. It can also be prepared by hand or in a bread machine on the dough setting. It is baked in a half sheet pan, which is how they do it in my old neighborhood.



Sicilian Style Pizza

Ingredients:
  • 1 medium russet potato
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1⅓ cup water
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp rapid-rise yeast
  • 3 tsp sugar
  • cup extra light olive oil
  • ⅔ cup marinara sauce
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1 cup parmigiano reggiano cheese
  • 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
  • Other toppings as desired

Instructions:

Place the potato in a medium saucepan and cover it with cold water. Bring the water to a boil over high heat and cook the potato until a paring knife inserted into the center meets no resistance, about 15 minutes. Squeeze the potato through a potato ricer into a bowl, discarding the skin, and allow the potato to cool at room temperature for 10 minutes. You should have 6 ounces of riced potato.

Combine the flour, salt, yeast, sugar, and 2 Tbs of olive oil in the bowl of stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. Add the water and mix on medium speed until the dough comes together and no dry flour remains. Add the cooled potato, increase speed to medium-high and mix until the dough is stretchy and smooth, about 6 minutes. The dough should stick to the bottom of the bowl but pull away from the sides.

Pour the remaining olive oil into a rimmed baking sheet and spread the oil over entire inner surface with your hands. Transfer the dough to the baking sheet and rub the top surface with oil until thoroughly coated. Cover the baking sheet with plastic wrap and allow the dough to rise at room temperature until it has spread out to nearly touch the rim of baking sheet, about 2 hours.

30 minutes before baking, adjust the oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 550F. Carefully remove the plastic wrap from the pizza dough. Using oiled hands and being as gentle as possible to maintain air bubbles, push and stretch the dough into the corners of the pan by pressing out from the center and lifting each corner and stretching it beyond the edge of the pan. It should pull back until the pan is filled with dough.

Spread approximately ⅔ cup of the sauce over top surface of the pizza dough with back of a spoon, leaving 1-inch border all the way around the edge. Sprinkle the top of the pizza with half of the Parmigiano reggiano cheese, focusing on the edges of the crust. Bake the pizza in the 550F oven for 5 minutes, remove it from oven, add any additional toppings, and spread the shredded mozzarella evenly over the surface. If you have extra sauce, dot the pizza with it in irregular spots. Placing the toppings under the cheese keeps them from falling off every time you take a bite!

Return the pizza to the oven and bake it until crust is well browned and the cheese is melted and lightly browned in spots, 10 to 15 minutes longer. Allow the pizza to cool for 5 minutes, transfer it to a large cutting board. If the pizza sticks to the pan at some point, use a spatula to carefully loosen it. Cut the pizza into 8 or 12 rectangular slices, depending on how hungry you are, and serve.
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Old 06-15-2018, 10:13 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
...it should be placed 1) at or near the bottom of the oven, near the heating coil, 2) near the center somewhere, or 3) just under the broiler (this particular recipe suggests preheating the stone for an hour, placing it 6” from the broiler, and cooking the pizza with the combined heat from the stone, and the broiler to cook the top. ????)

And what flour? Italian 00 flour? AP flour? Bread flour?...
This is all very confusing. I've gone through all the different iterations and you'd think the recipes online would be closer together.

I use AP flour because I don't want to pay extra for 00.

The idea behind the rack positioning 6" from the top of the oven is to try to duplicate a pizza oven which has a low ceiling so the heat can reflect down onto the top of the pizza.

You should put your stone on a shelf near the top of the oven and crank up the oven temp. (don't use the broiler) If you set it at the oven's max temp the 25 it's off won't make any real difference.

The hot stone (preheated for an hour as stone takes a long time to heat up) cooks the crust and the reflected heat off the top of the oven cooks the top of the pizza.

If that doesn't appeal to you. Leave the stone on or near the bottom of the oven and cook it there. See which you like better.

As for your cratered dough, I'd give it a try.
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Old 06-15-2018, 10:18 AM   #57
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I thank you for this recipe. It looks delicious. A bit complicated, but that doesn’t scare me. I’m saving it for a future weekend project. But I’m looking to make a New York style pizza. For one thing, I’ve never seen a square one, and this pizza looks like it has much thicker dough than the typical NYC pizza. And with all the variations I’ve looked at for “authentic” NYC style pizzas I’ve researched, I’ve never seen one that included potato in any form!
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Old 06-15-2018, 12:08 PM   #58
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I think it is said you need NYC area water to make NYC bagels and pizza.
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Old 06-15-2018, 12:25 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
I thank you for this recipe. It looks delicious. A bit complicated, but that doesn’t scare me. I’m saving it for a future weekend project. But I’m looking to make a New York style pizza. For one thing, I’ve never seen a square one, and this pizza looks like it has much thicker dough than the typical NYC pizza. And with all the variations I’ve looked at for “authentic” NYC style pizzas I’ve researched, I’ve never seen one that included potato in any form!
That recipe above is for thick crust siciliano pizza which is always thick and baked in rectangular or square pans. Usually the crust is pre baked with just a thin layer of sauce and maybe EVOO then topped and baked off to order. Which gives you a crisp bottom crust and a soft chewy top.

That’s the way we did it where I worked (Angelo’s Pizzaria in Maywood).

You want thin crust pizza which CAN be cooked in a jelly roll pan. I am born and raised in New Jersey. The best NYC thin crust pizza I have had was made in a rectangle jelly roll pan. That was MANY years ago and the owner died and the pizza place closed. Very sad day.

Most places make the traditional round pizzas. But some small mom and pop places do make a rectangle or square thin crust.
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Old 06-15-2018, 02:17 PM   #60
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Science! P.S. It's not the water

The Pizza Lab: New York Style Pizza at Home (Or How I Became a Food Processor Convert)

Dedicated to unraveling the mysteries of home pizza making through science.
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