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Old 12-03-2009, 09:00 AM   #1
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Pizza dough without white flour?

Hi gang, can someone help me, or suggest to me a recipie for pizza dough that's got no white flour in it. I'd like to do it with multigrain or something... i've been trying but as you can imagine they turn out like a rock. Do i just need to give in and use 1/2 white , 1/2 whole wheat or multigrain or something. can i get away from the white flour at all?

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Old 12-03-2009, 09:52 AM   #2
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Do you consider semolina to be a white flour? I spent a few years in the Tuscany region of Italy and the dough in a lot of the pizzas I consumed there was quite yellow. I think the dough they used had a high hydration ratio.
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Old 12-03-2009, 09:53 AM   #3
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You can use whole wheat with a little wheat gluten thrown in. The softness of the dough comes from the water/flour ratio, and whether you have added olive oil or not (which I always do). The amount of rise comes from letting the yeast fully develop (proof) for a long enough time (1-2 hours) before rolling out the pizza shape, AND afterward before putting on the toppings (usually 20 minutes or so.)
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Old 12-03-2009, 10:07 AM   #4
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Yeah, i'd try the semolina flour. I'm trying to build the healthiest pizza dough i can. I'm a bit anal about what i eat. I should also add, i'm a complete novice with cooking, so the whole wheat flour may not be my only problem with my rock hard dough hah.
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Old 12-03-2009, 10:14 AM   #5
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Just for your general information, Semolina is not truly a grain but is the milled endosperm of Durum Wheat. It is most commonly used in the making of pasta, is high in Gluten and high in protein. It can come either bleached or unbleached.

If you're impatient for pizza dough immediately, your local pizzeria will usually sell you a ball of their dough for a couple of dollars. You can even purchase a several and freeze them.
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Old 12-03-2009, 10:15 AM   #6
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High in protein is great, as I'm a vegetarian. What's the difference in bleached / unbleached. is one better for you?
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Old 12-03-2009, 11:10 AM   #7
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As in any recipe multigrain flour to liquid ratio compare to white flour to liquid is different. Much less, but I cannot be exact simply becasue I do not know the ration in this case. The fact that dough is hard for sure tells me that you have way too much flour.
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Old 12-03-2009, 11:52 AM   #8
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Ok, fair enough. Really what i'd like to accomplish here is just a 9 - 10" thin crust pizza. probably close to this : http://www.passion-4-pizza.com/image...pomodori-2.jpg
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Old 12-03-2009, 03:48 PM   #9
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Try here:
whole wheat pizza dough recipes - Google Search

Don't add all the flour at once, get it to a stage you can knead it without it being too gooey, then add the remaining flour as needed. Depending on the local humidity/dryness, you will probably use a different amount of flour each time. Once the dough is smooth, no longer sticky, it's ready to let rise.
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Old 12-03-2009, 04:32 PM   #10
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Making bread of any kind (and pizza dough is surely a bread) takes practice. The amount of flour in any bread recipe is only and always a "guesstimation." I'd suggest trying a couple of those whole wheat or multigrain recipes, and start with slightly more than half the flour they call for. add the remainder a bit at a time. You want a soft and pliable dough. Kneading properly will take practice, as well. and you cannot knead whole wheat bread too much. It will take at least twice as long to knead ww as white flour.

In the matter of bleached vs unbleached... kinda obvious, perhaps. Bleach is not really "good" for anything. White flour has already had the bran and most of the nutrients removed, bleaching takes care of the rest, but leaves a silky texture that is great for cakes. I never use bleached flour for bread.
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