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Old 12-29-2009, 12:55 PM   #11
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Greasing a pizza stone isn't the same thing as seasoning steel or iron. Grease or Pam will do nothing but perhaps, ruin your stone. In part, the stone wicks away moisture as well as apply heat, and it can't wick away moisture if the holes are clogged by oil. Do you see commercail Pizzerias oiling their ovens? I don't think so. They keep their stones as clean as possible.

The best way to keep food from sticking to your stone is to keep the food that touches it very dry. The cornmeal that Wyogal mentioned is the best way if your crust is somewhat damp (soft).

I don't use cornmeal on my pizza crust recipe, but I do preheat the stone to 500 degrees for 30 minutes before I use it. And then, when the pizza is ready to come out of the oven, I use a wooden pizza peel and a pair of long handled tongs. I lift the edge of the pizza with the tongs, and while still holding onto it, I slide the peel under the pizza and take it out.

I have found that the direct contact with the stone, instead of a layer of cornmeal, I get better crunch to my crust.

Good luck!
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:09 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
Greasing a pizza stone isn't the same thing as seasoning steel or iron. Grease or Pam will do nothing but perhaps, ruin your stone. In part, the stone wicks away moisture as well as apply heat, and it can't wick away moisture if the holes are clogged by oil. Do you see commercail Pizzerias oiling their ovens? I don't think so. They keep their stones as clean as possible.

The best way to keep food from sticking to your stone is to keep the food that touches it very dry. The cornmeal that Wyogal mentioned is the best way if your crust is somewhat damp (soft).

I don't use cornmeal on my pizza crust recipe, but I do preheat the stone to 500 degrees for 30 minutes before I use it. And then, when the pizza is ready to come out of the oven, I use a wooden pizza peel and a pair of long handled tongs. I lift the edge of the pizza with the tongs, and while still holding onto it, I slide the peel under the pizza and take it out.

I have found that the direct contact with the stone, instead of a layer of cornmeal, I get better crunch to my crust.

Good luck!
I've never watched a commercial pizzeria, so I wouldn't know. I was going off information from the Pampered Chef (that is the brand of my older stone) distributor.

If you preheat the stone, how do you press the dough out onto a 500 degree stone without burning yourself?
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:16 PM   #13
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I don't. I press the dough out on my work surface; transfer it to a well dusted peel (flour or cornmeal), dress it with sauce and toppings (quickly) shake it a few times to make certain it's not sticking, and then, over the hot stone, gently but quickly with a few small shakes, slide the pizza onto the stone. The stone must be hot in order to work properly. New York Pizzarias heat their stones to over 800 degrees before using them.
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:26 PM   #14
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I should explain... The pizza stone is not like a pizza baking pan. The stone represents the function of a stone hearth in a very hot oven.

Pizza pans are cold when used to prepare a pizza, and travel with it into and out of the oven. A pizza stone stays in the oven and is a hot surface upon which breads are baked.
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:30 PM   #15
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I don't. I press the dough out on my work surface; transfer it to a well dusted peel (flour or cornmeal), dress it with sauce and toppings (quickly) shake it a few times to make certain it's not sticking, and then, over the hot stone, gently but quickly with a few small shakes, slide the pizza onto the stone. The stone must be hot in order to work properly. New York Pizzarias heat their stones to over 800 degrees before using them.
I thought you said you didn't use cornmeal in your crust recipe.
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:32 PM   #16
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Have used Pampered Chef stoneware for years. (my wife was a rep), they suggest coat with a vegetable oil spray and/or bake high-fat foods for the first time. The absolute JOY of stoneware is it cleans up with WATER and a scraper. NOTE: the stoneware gets as hot as whatever you're baking, so don't worry about any contamination. Never get near soap!
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:34 PM   #17
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I don't. I use flour. Many people do use cornmeal and I was just including it in the example because it is a very common item to use, and does make the dough easier to slide.
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:38 PM   #18
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I don't. I use flour. Many people do use cornmeal and I was just including it in the example because it is a very common item to use, and does make the dough easier to slide.
Ok, I will have to look into getting a peel. I would think the metal peel would be easier to slide under the raw dough since it is thinner. Why is wood better?
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:42 PM   #19
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It's not. It's just a matter of personal preference. I like more tradition things, but that's me. When not in use, I hang it on the wall and it adds a more homey feeling to my kitchen.

Metal is just fine too, and yes, probably easier to use, but I've never used a metal one so I couldn't say.
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:47 PM   #20
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It's not. It's just a matter of personal preference. I like more tradition things, but that's me. When not in use, I hang it on the wall and it adds a more homey feeling to my kitchen.

Metal is just fine too, and yes, probably easier to use, but I've never used a metal one so I couldn't say.
Good to know, thanks!
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