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Old 04-26-2016, 01:19 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by otuatail View Post
Hi I have never made a Pizza before. I have downloaded a few recipes and I have a few questions about it.

1) Strong white flour + fast action dried yeast versus self raising flour

2) Use of a pizza dish or without. Professionals seem to do without.

3) Will the topping in the middle prevent rising as it is nicer to have a raised side.

Thanks.
1) ALWAYS strong white flour and yeast. NEVER self-raising flour (yuck - not nice for pizza!). Having said that I think your all-purpose flour is stronger than our self-raising flour and less strong than our bread (ie Strong) flour and so it might be OK if you don't want to buy special strong flour.

2) I just bake mine on a flat metal oven tray (the sort I bake scones or hand-shaped bread loaves and English muffins on).

3) It does for me. Put the topping where you want it, according to how much raised edge you want.

(Having said that, I am not an Italian or an American so do as you like.)
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Old 04-26-2016, 03:43 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
1) ALWAYS strong white flour and yeast. NEVER self-raising flour (yuck - not nice for pizza!). Having said that I think your all-purpose flour is stronger than our self-raising flour and less strong than our bread (ie Strong) flour and so it might be OK if you don't want to buy special strong flour.

2) I just bake mine on a flat metal oven tray (the sort I bake scones or hand-shaped bread loaves and English muffins on).

3) It does for me. Put the topping where you want it, according to how much raised edge you want.

(Having said that, I am not an Italian or an American so do as you like.)
The OP is from York so I think his flour is the same as yours.
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Old 04-28-2016, 10:31 AM   #23
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The OP is from York so I think his flour is the same as yours.
Thanks, GG. I hadn't noticed that. So many of DC's members are in the US that I forget that I'm not the only "foreigner".
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Old 04-28-2016, 05:48 PM   #24
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Thanks, GG. I hadn't noticed that. So many of DC's members are in the US that I forget that I'm not the only "foreigner".
And in exchange of nationalities, we as Americans have learned so much about what foods are available to those in other countries. We give a name brand forgetting that it just may not be available in 'that' country. We have learned the different names of our everyday products. So it has been quite an education for all of us, on both sides of the pond. Although I still do not understand what the heck "Clotted Cream" is. And is there a product of our that is similar?
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Old 04-28-2016, 06:27 PM   #25
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Although I still do not understand what the heck "Clotted Cream" is. And is there a product of our that is similar?
Clotted cream (sometimes called scalded, clouted, Devonshire or Cornish cream) is a thick cream made by indirectly heating full-cream cow's milk using steam or a water bath and then leaving it in shallow pans to cool slowly. During this time, the cream content rises to the surface and forms "clots" or "clouts".[1] It forms an essential part of a cream tea.
You can order a 6 ounce jar from Amazon.com
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Old 04-29-2016, 02:14 AM   #26
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Addie, about the best substitutes for it stateside are creme fraiche or mascarpone.

Substitutes for Clotted Cream | Everyday Life - Global Post
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Old 04-29-2016, 02:31 AM   #27
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Addie, about the best substitutes for it stateside are creme fraiche or mascarpone.

Substitutes for Clotted Cream | Everyday Life - Global Post
Thank you. I am going to have to give it a try. MB carries it, but in large jars. I only want a little so I can try it. If I like it, I will make it a regular on my grocery list. I know that mascarpone is used in a lot of Italian dishes and the crème fraiche in dishes of Spanish origin. Having grown up in this Italian town, I am sure I have had the mascarpone without even knowing it.
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Old 04-29-2016, 02:46 AM   #28
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Market Basket carries an assortment of each. You'll find it in the cheese case near the deli department and/or the dairy cases. Personally, I like the mascarpone a little better. It's like a smooth, buttery cream cheese, but it blends well if you're making a cream-based entree. It's like cream's richer cousin. Heck, I lick the butter knife clean when I spread some on a toasted bagel... And it melts into the bagel nicely, too.

Now I'm going to have to add mascarpone to my grocery list for tomorrow!
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Old 04-29-2016, 05:13 AM   #29
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Market Basket carries an assortment of each. You'll find it in the cheese case near the deli department and/or the dairy cases. Personally, I like the mascarpone a little better. It's like a smooth, buttery cream cheese, but it blends well if you're making a cream-based entree. It's like cream's richer cousin. Heck, I lick the butter knife clean when I spread some on a toasted bagel... And it melts into the bagel nicely, too.

Now I'm going to have to add mascarpone to my grocery list for tomorrow!
It is on my list. Regular cream cheese, I pull the wrapper back and eat it like a candy bar. Oh dear! I am in deep trouble is mascarpone is even better.
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