"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Pizza & Focaccia
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-19-2017, 03:05 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Hæȝelshām, Sūþseaxna Rīce
Posts: 154
Serving focaccia

Can anyone give me a definitive answer on how focaccia would be served in Italy? I can find a lot of recipes, but no information about how it is actually served. I have seen it served alongside cured meats, but is there any other way? With meals for soaking up sauces or...well anything like that?

__________________

__________________
Suthseaxa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2017, 03:57 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suthseaxa View Post
Can anyone give me a definitive answer on how focaccia would be served in Italy? I can find a lot of recipes, but no information about how it is actually served. I have seen it served alongside cured meats, but is there any other way? With meals for soaking up sauces or...well anything like that?
When we were in Italy, it was often served as sandwich bread. And to eat during a dinner meal.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC07431.jpg
Views:	24
Size:	56.8 KB
ID:	26022  
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2017, 07:34 AM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Hæȝelshām, Sūþseaxna Rīce
Posts: 154
That's interesting! It looks delicious. I'll have to try it with a meal too. Perhaps meatballs are on the cards :) Thanks
__________________
Suthseaxa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2017, 07:42 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 3,155
Like GG, I've seen it split and used for sammies. I've also seen it with toppings and used as a snack or appy type dish.

When I make it at home, it's initial use has always been for sammies, but we have used what's left for a meal to sop up juices, but I'm not sure if that's traditional. Just don't want to waste fresh homemade bread of any type.
__________________
medtran49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2017, 10:07 AM   #5
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 530
There are many typre of foccaccia in Italy : some bread style with tomataoes and herbs , other very thin and with a very thin sprinkling of Parmesan and salt and pepper. Some cooked in lard and some in olive oil, But there're virtual always pre-main meal nibbles,ì, of which Zampanelle are one, and friciulè another.

di reston
__________________
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2017, 05:33 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,639
Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
There are many typre of foccaccia in Italy : some bread style with tomataoes and herbs , other very thin and with a very thin sprinkling of Parmesan and salt and pepper. Some cooked in lard and some in olive oil, But there're virtual always pre-main meal nibbles,ì, of which Zampanelle are one, and friciulè another.

di reston
Always everywhere? Italy has a lot of regional differences.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2017, 05:53 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 19,743
Thanks, di. That's pretty much what I thought of them.

But, GG's got a point.

From Wikipedia:
Ancient Rome, panis focacius[1] was a flat bread baked on the hearth.[2] The word is derived from the Latin focus meaning "hearth, place for baking."[3] The basic recipe is thought by some to have originated with the Etruscans, but today it is widely associated with Ligurian cuisine.

As the tradition spread, the different dialects and diverse local ingredients resulted in a large variety of bread (some may even be considered cake). Due to the number of small towns and hamlets dotting the coast of Liguria, the focaccia recipe has fragmented into countless variations (from the biscuit-hard focaccia di Camogli to the oily softness of the one made in Voltri), with some bearing little resemblance to its original form. The most extreme example is a specialty called focaccia col formaggio ("focaccia with cheese") which is made in Recco, near Genoa. Other than the name, this Recco version bears no resemblance to other focaccia varieties, having a caillé and cheese filling sandwiched between two layers of paper-thin dough. It is even being considered for European Union PGI status.

Out of Liguria, focaccia comes in many regional variations and its recipe, its texture, its flavor remarkably varies from north to south of Italy. In some parts of the Northwest, for example, a popular recipe is focaccia dolce ("sweet focaccia"), consisting of a basic focaccia base and sprinkled lightly with sugar, or including raisins, honey, or other sweet ingredients.[4] Another sweet focaccia from the Northeast is focaccia veneta ("Venetian focaccia"), a typical cake of the Venetian Easter tradition: it is based on eggs, sugar and butter (instead of olive oil and salt) and it looks quite similar to panettone or to another Venetian cake like pandoro.

In northwestern regions of Italy, across the French border, so-called focaccia, fougasse or tarte glacée ("glazed cake" in French) is a Christmas and New Year's Eve cake topped by a sugar and egg-white glaze, commercially known as focaccia di Susa. A ciambella shaped version is called tarte couronne or couroun.

In South Tyrol and in the small village of Krimml in Austria, the so-called Osterfochaz (in Krimml Fochiz) is the traditional Easter gift of the Godparents to their Godchildren. Therefore, the bread is slightly thinner in the middle, in order to put in the coloured Easter eggs.[5]

Back to olive oil- and salt-based focacce (e.g. focaccia alla genovese, originated in Genoa), Central Italian cuisine has its own specialties as well. In Florence there are "focaccia with potato and rosmary" and schiacciata also called in the rest of Tuscany schiaccia. The Roman pizza bianca ("white pizza") can be extensively considered as variants of focaccia as well.

In the south Focaccia alla messinese is a typical focaccia from Messina, while focaccia barese or focaccia alla barese is common in the provinces of Bari, Brindisi, Lecce and Taranto. This latest focaccia is at least partially made with durum wheat flour and usually comes in three variations: classic focaccia with fresh tomatoes and often olives, potato focaccia with potato slices 5 mm thick and white focaccia with salt grains and rosemary. Some other variations include peppers, onions, eggplant or other vegetables.

Elsewhere in Europe, fougasse is a typical bread from Provence and from the French cuisine as a whole, also known as fogassa, foisse or fouaisse in local variations (e.g. in Burgundy and Languedoc); the name fogassa is also used in Catalonia, while Spaniards call this bread hogaza.

A variant of focaccia in the Balkans and Turkey is known as pogača. This South Slavic name is derived from focaccia via Byzantine Greek: πογάτσα.

As an aftermath of the Italian diaspora in the Americas, focaccia is also consumed in the United States, where it sometimes referred to as focaccia bread. In Argentina, it is widely known under the name of fugazza, derived from fugàssa in the native language of Argentina's many Ligurian immigrants.

Outside of Italy, focaccia is used extensively as a sandwich bread.

**********************************


You know, I learn so much here everyday. This will be one of those things that I'll sound like an expert on someday, and my family or friends will ask, "How the heck do you know that?".

I'll just smile and think of everyone here.

I still can't peel garlic without thinking of Andy.
__________________
The next time someone asks what you did this past weekend, squint really hard and say, "Why, what did you hear?"
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2017, 06:28 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 10,805
I really agree Bucky. I've learned so much here over the years. Tell me about Andy and peeled garlic?
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2017, 07:13 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 9,453
BT How does garlic remind you of Andy?
__________________
There is freedom within, there is freedom without
Try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
There's a battle ahead, many battles are lost
msmofet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2017, 12:10 PM   #10
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 530
There are many ways of serving foccaccia: but they're always either a light snack, or main dish. Some are main with poolish, others with a light batter then put in the oven with herbs and local cheeses, and come out crunchy and very light. They can be eaten cold as a sandwich, or hot as a side dish. Plus many other ways of serving them.

di reston

Enough is never as good good as a feast Oscar Wilde
__________________

__________________
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.