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Old 11-14-2004, 08:44 AM   #21
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If the buttermilk you purchase contains active cultures - that is, does not say "pasturized" - you can use it to clabber fresh milk. It's been awhile since I've done this but approximately 1 cup buttermilk to 3 cups fresh milk, shake it up, leave out at room temperature until the milk clabbers (?overnight? - maybe longer? it does take awhile)
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Old 11-14-2004, 10:56 PM   #22
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Wow - how old are you sub? Mandatory pasteurization of milk (in the US) began in the early 1940s. There "might" be some exceptions for cheeses that are aged over 60-days (haven't taken the time to go read the current laws in the Code of Federal Regulations) and some sates make exceptions on selling raw milk for a dairy farmer when sold directly to a consumer for their personal use.
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Old 11-14-2004, 11:09 PM   #23
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I use buttermilk, but I have used SACO powder. It seemed to work OK and I could not tell the difference between it and buttermilk in how the recipes turned out. Since, I have store within walking distance I don't use SACO any more.
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Old 11-15-2004, 02:36 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Wow - how old are you sub? Mandatory pasteurization of milk (in the US) began in the early 1940s. There "might" be some exceptions for cheeses that are aged over 60-days (haven't taken the time to go read the current laws in the Code of Federal Regulations) and some sates make exceptions on selling raw milk for a dairy farmer when sold directly to a consumer for their personal use.
I'm talking about whether buttermilk says it's made with active culture (not whether the milk itself was pasturized) - I can buy buttermilk with active culters in some supermarkets but in other supermarkets the buttermilk does not have active cultures. It's the same principle as using store-bought yogurt to provide a starter for homemade yogurt.
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Old 11-15-2004, 06:10 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subfuscpersona
If the buttermilk you purchase contains active cultures - that is, does not say "pasturized" - you can use it to clabber fresh milk. It's been awhile since I've done this but approximately 1 cup buttermilk to 3 cups fresh milk, shake it up, leave out at room temperature until the milk clabbers (?overnight? - maybe longer? it does take awhile)
subfusc, I know exactly what your referring to and have done it myself often. For you and the others, peek through this site....

http://biology.clc.uc.edu/Fankhauser...BUTTERMILK.HTM

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Old 12-17-2004, 02:14 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Audeo
Quote:
Originally Posted by subfuscpersona
If the buttermilk you purchase contains active cultures - that is, does not say "pasturized" - you can use it to clabber fresh milk. It's been awhile since I've done this but approximately 1 cup buttermilk to 3 cups fresh milk, shake it up, leave out at room temperature until the milk clabbers (?overnight? - maybe longer? it does take awhile)
subfusc, I know exactly what your referring to and have done it myself often. For you and the others, peek through this site....

http://biology.clc.uc.edu/Fankhauser...BUTTERMILK.HTM

My old Irish granny would be spinning in her grave if she read this thread! lol I can confirm that buttermilk will keep for weeks without a problem. When I was back in Northern Ireland helping with the hay making, a worker discovered a jar of buttermilk in the hedge.

To our horror and disgust, he raised the clotted and blackened contents to his lips and slurped the lot down with evident relish!

"You wouldn't eat an apple before it was ripe boys!" was his reply to our cries of outrage and alarm!

I would not recommend this as a party trick(!) but the website above is correct in saying that the acid content of the buttermilk helps preserve it.

I strongly believe that the pasteurisation of so many American foodstuffs has contributed to the high level of sickness suffered by this nation. Europe does not pasteurise everything to the extent that America does and they are not dropping like flies!

Anyone who has eaten a genuine GFrench **unpasteurised** blue cheese will recognise the difference in taste immediately. Mmmm, speaking of which, where did I put that cheese I brought back from Prague this week? ;)
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Old 12-18-2004, 09:42 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keen kook
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audeo
Quote:
Originally Posted by subfuscpersona
If the buttermilk you purchase contains active cultures - that is, does not say "pasturized" - you can use it to clabber fresh milk. It's been awhile since I've done this but approximately 1 cup buttermilk to 3 cups fresh milk, shake it up, leave out at room temperature until the milk clabbers (?overnight? - maybe longer? it does take awhile)
subfusc, I know exactly what your referring to and have done it myself often. For you and the others, peek through this site....

http://biology.clc.uc.edu/Fankhauser...BUTTERMILK.HTM

My old Irish granny would be spinning in her grave if she read this thread!
lol I can confirm that buttermilk will keep for weeks without a problem.
I want to thank audeo and keen kook for their contributions. Audeo's link to http://biology.clc.uc.edu/Fankhauser...BUTTERMILK.HTM gives precise instructions and shows how easy it is to make buttermilk at home.

Buttermilk is excellent for baking (pancakes, quick breads, etc.) and also is a wonderful tenderizing and flavoring medium for poultry.

Sometimes we forget how easy and inexpensive it is to make basic ingredients in a home kitchen. These basic ingredients are the foundations for a home cooked meal that tastes great, provides solid nutrition and doesn't take a week's salary for the ingredients.
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Old 12-19-2004, 07:30 AM   #28
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Wow, I started this one a month and a half ago and I see it just popped to the top again. I have been using SACO buttermilk powder now for about a month and a half, and I've been pleased with it so far. It was $2.33 for a 12 ounce can that makes 3.75 quarts. Lasts two years if refrigerated after opening.
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