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Old 04-14-2007, 01:44 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
Will this technique work with buckwheat pancakes?
yep

here is the recipe I work from...


Whole Wheat Buttermilk Pancakes 9-12 pancakes

2 eggs
2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
1 ¾ cups buttermilk or yogurt
1 t. baking soda
1 t. baking powder
½ t. salt
2 T. oil

Beat the eggs well.
Add other ingredients except oil and mix. ADD OIL AND MIX AGAIN.
Fry on hot griddle


Variation, add ½ cup diced apples, ¼ cup chopped walnuts and ¼ t. cinnamon.


Since I no longer have easy access to whole wheat pastry (cake/soft) flour, I now use whole wheat bread flour. And I am always fussing the the flour ingredients. Currently I am using 1 cup ww bread flour, 1/3 cup buckwheat flour, 1/3 cup ground up oats and 1/3 cup ground flax seed.

What recipe do you use??
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Old 04-14-2007, 02:56 PM   #12
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My pancake recipe varies throughout the year. In January, I make heavy pancakes with cream & butter in the recipe. They have to be cooked over low heat or else they will burn quickly because of the cream. I use all purpose flour. They require two more eggs and some baking powder. The weather usually is warmer this time of the year (April) and my pancakes will become lighter. To the traditional pancake recipe, I will add a packet of Butter Buds and omit the salt (BB is so loaded with sodium). [During the winter no one really cares for a lot for sides but as the weather gets warmer, sides are welcomed back). During the spring, everyone is banking on sugar and want more syrups than butter and a few sausage links and scrambles. During the summer, my pancakes are skimpy, small and thin. This is when I would like to have a good wheat pancake especially for the flavor because everyone wants fruit to include cantaloupe and watermelon. During the fall, I make pumpkin pancakes and potato pancakes. I am going to use your wheat recipe this year. I think my problem with the wheat recipe is over mixing and making glue out of the gluten. Have you ever added wheat germ to your pancake batter? When I am fortunate enough to have pecan flour, I use some in place of the flour (3 parts flour/1part pecan flour). Sometimes we have corn cakes or skillet cornbread. There are those who like the crispy crunch of that.
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Old 04-14-2007, 07:05 PM   #13
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This is very cool.

Since I always mix buckwheat flour (with the Bisquick) it sounds like with heavier flours boosting the bubble is a good idea. If I recall, baking soda needs an acid added (lemon juice, buttermilk) to become active.

I find buckwheat a little overwhelming so I cut it a little with all purpose.

I love the advice to vary the recipe and now understand that slow and low is only needed if there are solids that will burn. I tend to prefer a dryer, hotter griddle.

So I think the recipe for the next batch I try will add egg, baking soda, and some lemon juice.

My goal for this thread was to figure out how to get a much fluffier pancake and it sound like egg and baking soda and/or powder are the trick.

I also tend to add a little vanilla or almond extract.

Liv
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Old 04-15-2007, 01:00 AM   #14
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The following is the recipe I use and have given to literally hundreds of people. It is also the only recipe the church to which I belong will use. It has never failed me. I arrived at it by taking a basic "from-scratch" recipe and playing with it. Like you, it sometimes came out wonderful, while at other times, the pancakes were just decent pancakes. My eldest daughter, who was still jsut a child back then was the person who actually noticed the bit of information that made the difference. When the pancakes came out super light and fluffy, she noticed that I was sloppy when measuring in the oil. aFter that, I carefully measured the amount of oil that I added to the batter and found the right amount. Here is that recipe, and the techniques that make it work.

Preheat your griddle so that water enrgetically dances on its surface when dripped on.

Ingredients:

1 cup all-purpose flour (has enough gluten for the bubbles to hold and not collapse)

1/2 tsp. salt (for flavor only)

2 tbs. sugar or equivalent sweetener (you can use honey, sucralose, stevia, etc.)

1 tbs. double acting baking powder (first set of leavening ingredients start working when they become wet. Second set activate when heat is applied)

Mix the above ingredients in a large, non-reactive bowl such as stainless steel or glass. A wire whip makes mixing a breeze.

Add in order:

1 large egg (will imulsify the oil and help maintain bubble structure)

3 tbs. cooking oil (adss moisture to the pancake and helps make it tender)

3/4 cup, plus 2 tbs. whole or 2% milk (adds flavor and moisture to the batter)

Whip these ingredients gently into the dry ingredients with the wire whisk. Blend just until everything is wet. There should be small lumps distributed though the batter. If you mix until the lumps are gone, then you will have over-developed the gluten, which will make the pancakes rubbery.

To cook, place three to four tablespoons of batter onto the grill for each pancake. Cook over medium heat until bubbles just start to form. Flip each pancake and cook for another minute or so. You will be able to tell when the flip side is done as the edges will start to lift from the pan.

If you want to add fruit such as straberry slices, or diced peaches, then add an extra 1/2 tsp of baking soda to ballance the batter. If you are adding bananas, or blueberries, then drop on top of the cooking pancake.

You can also add other flavorings to your pancakes such as vanilla, or butterscotch. You can mix in chocolate chips as well.

If you want to make whole wheat pancakes, use the same recipe and technique as above, but add one extra egg to the batter before mixing. Cinnamon and nutmeg really add a wonderful flavor to whole wheat pancakes.

Buckwheat isn't really a grain, but rather, a ground seed. It has less starch and more protien, and can be coarse and strong tasting. So mix no more than 1 part buckwheat to 2 parts flour or the pancakes can get very heavy.

IF I'm going to use the batter to make waffles, then I add an extra half tsp. baking powder to the dry ingredients so that the batter will expand to completely fill the grids. I also seperate the eggs, and add the yolks directly to the batter. I whip the egg-whites into stiff peaks and gently fold them into the batter until they are completely incorporated. Waffle grids must be well oiled to prevent sticking.

One more thing, I know a lady who absolutely swears by buttermilk and baking soda. I haven't had the opportunity to try them, and so am unqualified to say that they are better or worse. But her family loves them.

Hope this helps. Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 04-15-2007, 10:25 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
One more thing, I know a lady who absolutely swears by buttermilk and baking soda. I haven't had the opportunity to try them, and so am unqualified to say that they are better or worse. But her family loves them.

Hope this helps. Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
From what I'm learning here, you can make a good buttermilk substitute by adding a tablespoon of lemon juice to the milk and letting it stand 10 minutes before mixing. Buttermilk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This also creates the acid baking soda needs.

Liv
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Old 04-15-2007, 12:29 PM   #16
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Not sure about the chemestry per se, how ever the recipe is, how should i say it polightly, gm, no good, i'd never use milk for pancake. Milk makes them flat, hard, not soft etc. Sugar may contribute to burning of the pancakes when frying. Oil in the batter is ususaly adde so you do not have to add it during frying, however 3T of it is just way too much. Baking poweder is a good idea, i prefer baking soda though, never heard that soda could be substitude with egg, hm, never tried that of course. Well, that's about it.
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Old 04-15-2007, 01:12 PM   #17
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Yeah, CharlieD, you are right about adding oil/fat to the recipe. It helps mine to get done in the middle or they would be cold & gooey on the inside and probably burnt on the outside. After your post, I checked a few more things and pancakes are also made with yeast products. This is probably where the milk & sugar originated. It seems like the same recipe but they just take away the yeast and add baking powder or baking soda. ((you really do not want my pioneer pancake recipe. They are durable enough to hold up while you look for a honey hive!))
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Old 04-15-2007, 03:35 PM   #18
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I also whip my egg whites for a fluffier pancake. I also like to make it with whole wheat flour and doesn't seem to make any significant difference.

I make 2 versions.

Version 1: We have chocolate chip pancakes (with which I pour the batter on the griddle, then add the chips) and serve it with apricot syrup.

Version 2: I add lemon zest and juice to the batter and serve it with maple syrup that is heated up with blueberries thrown in.
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Old 04-16-2007, 08:59 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
Not sure about the chemestry per se, how ever the recipe is, how should i say it polightly, gm, no good, i'd never use milk for pancake. Milk makes them flat, hard, not soft etc. Sugar may contribute to burning of the pancakes when frying. Oil in the batter is ususaly adde so you do not have to add it during frying, however 3T of it is just way too much. Baking poweder is a good idea, i prefer baking soda though, never heard that soda could be substitude with egg, hm, never tried that of course. Well, that's about it.
So, I assume you use water instead of milk then(?). Sounds to me like you have a completely different recipe. Would you post it and some sense of the results? This is exactly why I started the thread in the first place: to see different recipes and learn why people change the ingredients or the proportions.

I'm not looking for a good recipe so much as to learn what the effects of differences in recipes on the final product. I know that a previous post talked wisely about varying the recipe seasonally because of what people might want with their pancakes, generally I think some of the characteristics I'm looking for are things like light and fluffy and evenly cooked with a light browning on the sides.

Liv
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Old 04-16-2007, 11:48 AM   #20
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Where is Alton Brown when you need him?!?!?

As an engineer by profession, I am plagued by the "what makes this work" syndrome way too often, especially with food since it tends to be a not-as-familiar medium relative to the DW’s expertise. I suppose that is why I like the Alton Brown show on Food Network (The DW is less impressed but that is what makes a nice balance between styles and tastes! )

Thanks, StirBlue, for the detailed description of pancake preparation. I would also be interested to know the effects of too little, too much use of the other ingredients affect the end result as well, if anybody has further insight. (Hence the desire to see an Alton Brown episode like “Uncovering the Panacea of the Pancake”!)

I typically make a batch of pancakes with:
Dry – 3.5C Flour, 1C Sugar, 1Tbsp Baking Powder, 1 Tsp Salt

Wet – 3 Eggs, 1+C Milk, 1 stick melted butter (cooled), 1+ Tbsp Mexican Vanilla
(The plus signs usually equate to a little more being added as necessary to reach desired consistency/taste) preparation and cooking is similar to previous posts.

I have tended to experiment with the recipe, finding the “Fav” of the “Fam” being butterscotch pancakes, or butterscotch morsels sprinkled atop the batter once poured on the griddle. The vanilla adds to the richness of the taste. I have also varied the recipe by adding Hershey chocolate syrup (preferred over cocoa powder), white chocolate morsels (not as good as one would think ), shredded coconut (served with pineapple preserves for a tropical touch, very good! ), and various berries.

I also make a batch of the above with the added ingredients of two jars of baby food (some chicken/vegetable blend) to put additional nutrients into my little one who loves the pancakes but doesn’t always like the taste of healthier foods. I make a huge batch on the weekends that we freeze and it lasts mom for a couple of weeks.

Edit --- Ok, failed to realize there was a PAGE 2 before posting!! what great info! thanks goodweed for the detailed description. I apologize to livingston for not being able to add to the thread with as much chemical prowess and ingredient interaction intuition, but can't wait to make some next weekend!
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