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Old 04-16-2007, 11:59 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT

I typically make a batch of pancakes with:
Dry – 3.5C Flour, 1C Sugar, 1Tbsp Baking Powder, 1 Tsp Salt

Wet – 3 Eggs, 1+C Milk, 1 stick melted butter (cooled), 1+ Tbsp Mexican Vanilla
(The plus signs usually equate to a little more being added as necessary to reach desired consistency/taste) preparation and cooking is similar to previous posts.



I also make a batch of the above with the added ingredients of two jars of baby food (some chicken/vegetable blend) to put additional nutrients into my little one who loves the pancakes but doesn’t always like the taste of healthier foods. I make a huge batch on the weekends that we freeze and it lasts mom for a couple of weeks.

One cup sugar? Was that a misprint?

The recipe I posted earlier in this thread, uses no sugar.

Children are not born with a desire for sugar, it is a learned taste. If they never are exposed to sugar, they never develope a taste for it.
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Old 04-16-2007, 12:19 PM   #22
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No misprint. The basic recipe is one taken from another i had found online (alas no wonderful generation-by-generation recipe handed down). After looking deeper online, I see most flour to sugar ratios are 12:1 or 8:1 where mine is 3.5:1, yes.

I never really questioned it before (after all they tasted so good! ... hmmm, maybe now i know why !!) I have a feeling much of my "usual" recipe in general will be altered going forward ... thanks.
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Old 04-16-2007, 12:22 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Livingston
So, I assume you use water instead of milk then(?). Sounds to me like you have a completely different recipe. Would you post it and some sense of the results? This is exactly why I started the thread in the first place: to see different recipes and learn why people change the ingredients or the proportions.

I'm not looking for a good recipe so much as to learn what the effects of differences in recipes on the final product. I know that a previous post talked wisely about varying the recipe seasonally because of what people might want with their pancakes, generally I think some of the characteristics I'm looking for are things like light and fluffy and evenly cooked with a light browning on the sides.

Liv
Oh, no, no water. Absolute best base for the pancake mix is butter milk, or the second best is plain yougurt.

1 cup butter milk
1 cup flour
1 extra large egg
pinch of salt
1 tspoon baking soda and about 1-2 Tspoon vinegar mixed together.
oli for frying.

Mix the liquid ingredents first add dry ingredeents, well it's only flour. Add and mix gradually, make sure the batter doesn't have any clumbs (sp?, or whatever they are called).

Done, start frying.
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Old 04-16-2007, 12:25 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
Not sure about the chemestry per se, how ever the recipe is, how should i say it polightly, gm, no good, i'd never use milk for pancake. Milk makes them flat, hard, not soft etc. Sugar may contribute to burning of the pancakes when frying. Oil in the batter is ususaly adde so you do not have to add it during frying, however 3T of it is just way too much. Baking poweder is a good idea, i prefer baking soda though, never heard that soda could be substitude with egg, hm, never tried that of course. Well, that's about it.
If you were refrering to me (gw), then I have to take issue with what you said. I have been using milk for years and have givin this recipe to more peopole than I can count. One person stated that my pancake recipe consistancy was more like cake than pancakes. Others, who told me they didn't like pancakes became converts and the pancakes recipe I use became one of their favorite meals.

Before you categorically dismiss my pancake recipe, try it. And as for the oil, it serves to create a more moist end product. The water tends to steam away quickly, resulting in a dry pancake. In all quickbreads, the oil remains after the water has evaporated, allowing the product, be it cake, pancake, spice-bread, banana bread, etc. to remain moist and tender. In fact, try this little experiment if you don't want to take me at my word. Next time you make a boxed cake mix, add and extra 2 tablespoons of cooking oil to the recipe and compare to an identicle cake made using the exact recipe from the box. You will find that the cake with the extra oil is much more moist than the original recipe. The famous and much loved chocolate/mayonaise cake uses this priciple to develop its moist and tender texture.

Believe me, I have done the experimentation and comparisons. I'm not just guessing, or writing to see my own words on the screen.

Please doon't take this aas an angry posting because it isn't. I am only defending what I said in my previous post. And I do that because the recipe I posted, and the reasons why it works are based upon experience and careful observation.

Again, I invite you to try my recipe, then, if you end up with skinny, hard pancakes, I will try and figure out where the recipe went wrong. Here is the recipe again, just to make sure I am giving it properly:

Ingredients:
Mix together dry with a balloon whisk-
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 tbs. sugar or honey, or Splenda (it doesn't affect the pancakes no matter which one you use)
1/2 tsp. salt
2 1/2 tsp. double-acting baking powder

Add:
1 large egg
3/4 plus 2 tbs. milk
3 tbs. cooking oil

Again whisk everything together until just blended. There should be little lumps. Cook in a pre-heated griddle over medium heat until bubbles begin to form on top. Flip and cook until the edges start to lift from the pan. Serve with your favorite syrup, jam, or jelly along with a bit of sausage or bacon.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 04-16-2007, 12:30 PM   #25
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Actually, Goodweed of the North, I was refering to the original post, sorry, did no read your post.
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Old 04-16-2007, 05:18 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
Actually, Goodweed of the North, I was refering to the original post, sorry, did no read your post.
It's all good. Oh, and I think I know where you're comming from with the milk producing hard and thin pancakes. You use baking soda in your recipe. With baking soda you have to add an acid to create the leavening action. And ordinary milk just doesn't have that acid. So in your recipe, you are absolutely correct.

I like my recipe bacasue the double acting baking powder creates two leavening actions, which results in a very fluffy pancake. As an adjunct, I tried using cake flour in my recipe and found that the pancakes were two tender, that is they were too delicate. I couldn't flip them as they literally fell apart as they were lifted from the griddle. I also tried and experiment with a cake recipe, adding an extra 2 tsp. of baking powder to the original recipe. Again, the cake had more loft, but was too delicate to hold together. So I added an extra egg to the batter, with the extra baking powder, and that gave it enough body to create a very lofty cake.

The downside is that if you aren't very careful, the extra sodium from either baking powder or baking soda can adversely affect the flavor. 2 tsp. baking powder plus 1 addtional extra-large egg plus two extra tbs. cooking oil made an exceptional cake. But you know me; I had push the boundries still further. 3 extra tsp. baking powder beyond the original recipe amounts ruins the flavor of a standard cake recipe.

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Old 04-22-2007, 01:32 PM   #27
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Excellent thread. I started this discussion not to get a scratch pancake recipe but to learn how each ingredient effected the outcome. In reading all the posts there were quite a few comments that I put into my first experiment. Buttermilk was used because of two comments: 1) that people loved the recipe with it and 2) the acid in the buttermilk activated the soda in the baking powder. One person mentioned nutmeg and cinnamon so they were added. I added an extra egg because of comments about how they aided the rise. Because of the extra egg I added 1/3 C of flour (was going to use 1/3 C buckwheat and 2/3 C all purpose). I was confused about the posts that disagreed about adding cooking oil, but since I wanted to get as much air in as I could I decided to start with the oil in.

The first experiment was:

1/3 C buckwheat
1 C all purpose flour (increased because of the extra egg)
2 t baking powder, double acting
1/2 t salt
2 T sugar
1/2 t nutmeg
1/2 t cinnamon
1 C buttermilk (provides acid for baking soda in baking powder)
2 eggs (increased to get a better rise)
3 T cooking oil
Whisk dry ingredients together. Add wet ingredients and lightly whisk until just blended. Cook on a medium (~325-degree F) griddle until lightly brown on one side. Flip and cook to the same doneness on the other side.

And here's the result:


The pancakes were airy (much better than when I used the Bisquick recipe). They were a little crumbly (like cake) which may have been caused by the buckwheat. Although the combination of buckwheat, cinnamon, and nutmeg flavors were interesting, I found it a little overwhelming.

This test gives me the confidence to abandon the Bisquick. Nothing wrong with BQ but this was about understanding ingredients and I needed more control.

The next time I'm going to drop the nutmeg and up the proportion of cinnamon. I think I'm going to also decrease the percentage of buckwheat just a little. Now that I'm paying more attention, it was just a tiny bit overpowering. In the past I've added almond or vanilla extract and I may do that again in the next test.

Would someone please remind me of what to do when adding fruit? We're pretty much blueberry pancake fans so let's start there. I use fresh frozen blueberries. I think I read not to add them to the batter but to sprinkle on top of the pancakes when they are first put on the griddle. Why? It would seem to me that if you want to keep the blueberries from coming in direct contact with the griddle (if that's the reason), adding them in this way will only prevent that for half the cooking. If they're added to the batter at least the get a coating which should help them from burning.

Thanks all

Liv
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Old 04-22-2007, 05:08 PM   #28
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I sprinkle them on top. The pancake puffs up around them so there is less contact with the griddle than you might expect. Also they are evenly distibuted.
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Old 04-22-2007, 06:37 PM   #29
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Livingston,

The best buttermilk pancake recipe that I have found is on the back of the SACO brand of powdered buttermilk. It comes in a round tan and blue carton featuring a Chef on the front. Where I come from it is found along the bakery aisle with the flours, sugars, etc. and not next to the pancake mixes. It's very simple to make buttermilk by adding water to the powder and the carton itself will keep a long time. (1/4 cup powder to 1 cup water to make a cup of buttermilk). I keep the carton in the fridge but it's not necessary. Anyway, on the back is a recipe that I've used for many years and it has never failed me and makes very light airy pancakes. I far prefer it over Bisquick's recipe which is doughy and heavy tasting to me. Be sure that as with any recipe that everything is at room temp. and that you only mix until combined. You will have some lumps but also a light batter. A whisk is very handy for this. Also be sure that you pour the pancake batter in a hot pan that has been heated to the point where it makes water drops dance and sizzle. Then it's hot enough. Don't flip until you see bubbles around the edges. I then use a toothpick or raw spaghetti strand to test for doneness before removing from the pan. Using a light gluten flour (regular) will give the lightest pancakes but by all means mix in some buckwheat and whole wheat along with the white. Just keep in mind that you will have a bit heavier batter. Good luck with experimenting!
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Old 04-22-2007, 08:48 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdejarnette
I sprinkle them on top. The pancake puffs up around them so there is less contact with the griddle than you might expect. Also they are evenly distibuted.
Is there any reason not to add them to the batter (other than to get a more even distribution)?

And thanks for the post on SACO powdered b'milk. Is this the recipe?

SACO | Best Buttermilk Pancakes

I remember reading here (and elsewhere) that because "cultured buttermilk" is milk with an acid added (and sometimes a butter flake) one can make a good substitute by adding 1 tbsp of lemon juice to milk and then letting it stand for 10 minutes before using in a recipe (vinegar or cream of tarter can also be used but I can't get my brain around that for pancakes).

Remembering that this thread was originally started to understand the effects of different ingredients and different proportions, I wonder if adding melted butter (instead of the oil) will give a better approximation of real buttermilk(?)

It's apparent from my first experiment that I need to lighten the pancakes (as I posted earlier the result I got may have been because of the buckwheat - I think I'll leave it out next time to see what happens).

Liv
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