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Old 09-05-2004, 01:19 AM   #21
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Alix;

From reading your recipe, I see that they are similar. The greatest difference of course is the lack of cooking oil in you pancakes. However, as you stated, that is added by cooking with butter. Teh butter is absorbed inot the pancake and also serves to crisp the edges. I occasionally use butter, or if I'm feeling like a bad boy (too much cholesteral here) I'll use the leftover sausage grease to crisp the edges and add flavor.

The real difference between our end products stems more from cooking technique than recipe difference. Both techniques, cooking on a dry, non-stick surface, or one with hot fat, produces a great pancake. Sometimes I'll use one, while other times I'll use the other. Oh, when camping, the hot fat in a cast-iron pan is a must for me.

Our other ingredients are similar. ONe thing bothered me though. I know that if you upset the chemical ballance between the base and acid, the reaction will give off less CO2 and your pancakes will become more dense. I would thing that if you use buttermilk, at least if it's cultured, the extra acid would require the use of baking soda rather than baking powder. I have found that acidic fruit causes my pancakes to become more dense unless I ballance it with extra baking soda.

Also, if you want your waffles to come out very light and crisp, seperate the eggs and beat the egg-whites. Combine the remaining ingredients into a batter that is thinner than pancake batter. Fold in the whipped egg-whites.

This allows the batter to rise into the waffle grids with less solid particles per filled grid. Teh result is a lighter, crispier waffle. Of course, if you like your waffles heavier, then thicken the batter and add the full egg in before mixing.

Another great use for the waffle is as a savory side, like bread. Just reduce the sugar and add savory herbs or spices. Teh waffles can then be topped with things like pulled pork, and smothered in a rich gravy, like an open-faced sandwich. It can be used as the crust for quick pizzas, or a vehicle to carry your favorite sandwich fillings.

You can also flavor waffle batter with cinamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, etc. You can add mashed sweet potato to the batter, or squash, etc.

Waffles are extremely versatile and are an under-used food.

My favorite wafffles are yeast risen, with whipped egg-whites folded in, then cooked in a belgian waffle iron. Top with fresh fruit and whipped cream.

Just some food for thought, or the belly.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-05-2004, 08:16 AM   #22
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These are the best and so easy
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Old 09-05-2004, 01:15 PM   #23
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Goodweed, I must admit, more often than not I don't use any oil, butter or anything to cook these. A combination of basic laziness and a really great electric frying pan. This recipe is so easy to make and the recipe is easy to memorize. My basic belief in cooking is the simpler the better. K.I.S.S method is foolproof when cooking. Less fuss, less ingredients...less chance to screw up.

The chemical balance doesn't seem to suffer with buttermilk. I don't use buttermilk often simply because I don't like it much. I only use it for soaking chicken and making biscuits.
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Old 09-05-2004, 01:22 PM   #24
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I tried your recipe for the pancakes. They were very good, but I have been using a recipe that is exactly the same except you added the extra 1/8 cup of milk. I found that any pancake recipe I add 3 tsp of double acting powder and to any pancake mix I also add 3 tsp of double acting powder (as long as there is at least one cup of flour in the recipe) and the all come out high and light and fluffy. The baking powder is the secret.
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Old 09-05-2004, 01:24 PM   #25
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Cookienut...did you mean Goodweed's or mine?
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Old 09-05-2004, 01:29 PM   #26
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Sorry Alix, I mean Goodweed's. :roll: But your's do you look yummy. I will try them next weekend.
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Old 09-05-2004, 10:29 PM   #27
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Similar to Ones I Make All The Time

This is my recipe (adapted from a book by Lora Brody):

1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 tbsp double acting baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 tbsp oat bran, my addition - not in original recipe
2 tbsp Splenda (or sugar)

Wet:
1 cup milk or buttermilk
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tbsp oil, to 2

Mix wet with dry. Whisk out the lumps as slowly and carefully as you can. Make a smooth batter. Cover and let stand for 1/2 hour.

Heat a cast iron griddle. When hot, brush with butter. Put 2 tbsp of batter (or 3 for a bit larger pancake) on griddle and cook until bubbles are almost finished popping, and then turn. Cook until browned on other side.

Remove to large piece of tin foil. Cover and then cook the rest of the pancakes.

Makes very fluffy pancakes and can be used for waffle batter too. No need to separate eggs and fold in whites. I hate that.

I use a whisk or a hand blender to make the batter, altho' I have used the regular blender too. I put in all the wet ingredients, pulse a few times and then add the dry ingredients. Blend until a smooth batter forms.

Cover and let it rest for 1/2 hr.

Anyway, I've been making these pancakes/waffles for years now. My hubbys favorite. The easiest I know too, without going the Bisquick route.

I have tried others (David Rosengarten, pumpkin pancakes from the web and restaurants), and other books and always come back to this one.

In fact, this morning I tried a recipe for Yeasted Waffles and ended up throwing it out as it made the most awful waffle batter I've ever seen and I tried it in the waffle maker and it didn't work at all. I immediately made my all time favorite and they worked well, as usual.

I'll try this one and let you know what i think.

RisaG
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Old 09-06-2004, 09:07 AM   #28
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I freely admit that my recipe is just a bit above average, that is until the extra tablespoon of oil is added to the batter. Then, they come out with an amazingly good texture, very moist and tender. If undercooked at all though, they come out gooey.

I just couldn't seem to put my finger on why the basic recipe sometimes came out good, and sometimes came out incredible. My eldest daughter discovered the reason. She noticed that when I was sloppy adding the cooking oil, allowing the measring spoon to overflow, the pancakes came out much better. I then began experimenting by carefully measuring the coocin oil, while keeping the other ingredients the same. The result of those experiments is my recipe.

There are surely other methods for adding moisture to pancakes, such as the addition of fiber such as psilliaum husks, or applesauce. But in my experience, the applesauce tends to make the pancakes gooey, as does the addition of starchy fruit pulp such as banana. It could be that I just added too much of the fruit.

I also know that adding an extra tbs. of oil to a boxed cake-mix results in a much better cake texture. However, if you add extra leavening agent, such as baking powder, you also have to add an extra egg or the crumb will be so delicate as to literally fall apart when trying to frost, and when trying to serve.

Cooking is much like chemistry. All parts must be used in the proper amounts to get the desired results. However, if you make the pancake batter by my recipe, but use buttermilk rather than milk, and add a tsp. or so of baking soda, then you have ballanced the acid/alkali ratio and the batter performs well.

I don't understand letting the batter rest. I allows much of the leavening action of chemical engredients to use themselves up. Its true that the second set of ingredients in double-acting baking powder are not activated until heat is applied. This second leavening action will allow the pancakes to rise. But why not get the benefit of both actions, creating a still flurfier product.

All I know is that at our anual church pancake breakfast, with home produced real maple syrup, my recipe is the only one they will use. I couldn't attend two years ago due to work requirements. I never heard so many complaints about pancakes. They insisted that I be there for the yearly pancake breadfast get-together. Kinda made me feel good.

Anyway, this is a good discussion thread. I'm seeing other recipes to try, some of which I know to be succesfull and popular. I know my recipe isn't the only valid, or even great recipe out there. I just know it's one of the great ones. And I got braggin' rights as it's mine and my daughters, even if others have used exactly the same recipe. We came up with it without help from others. We re-invented the wheel. The same it true of my egg-roll recipe. It's completely different than any I've had by anyone else. I and my family like it better. That doesn't mean that there aren't other great ones out there, and I understand that.

Food is a very personal thing as we all have our biases (impossible not to have one as we all have differing tastes and expectations based on our taste-bud sensitivity, regional preferences, what we are just plain used to, even such things as whether we like our meat a bit chewy, or almost mushy tender or crispy). I don't believe there is one "right" way to cook anything. What is incredible to me may be disgusting to you, and vice-versa. That's just the thing that makes cooking so great. There is enough variety in texture and flavor to satisfy every desire.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-06-2004, 09:10 AM   #29
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I freely admit that my recipe is just a bit above average, that is until the extra tablespoon of oil is added to the batter. Then, they come out with an amazingly good texture, very moist and tender. If undercooked at all though, they come out gooey.

I just couldn't seem to put my finger on why the basic recipe sometimes came out good, and sometimes came out incredible. My eldest daughter discovered the reason. She noticed that when I was sloppy adding the cooking oil, allowing the measring spoon to overflow, the pancakes came out much better. I then began experimenting by carefully measuring the coocin oil, while keeping the other ingredients the same. The result of those experiments is my recipe.

There are surely other methods for adding moisture to pancakes, such as the addition of fiber such as psilliaum husks, or applesauce. But in my experience, the applesauce tends to make the pancakes gooey, as does the addition of starchy fruit pulp such as banana. It could be that I just added too much of the fruit.

I also know that adding an extra tbs. of oil to a boxed cake-mix results in a much better cake texture. However, if you add extra leavening agent, such as baking powder, you also have to add an extra egg or the crumb will be so delicate as to literally fall apart when trying to frost, and when trying to serve.

Cooking is much like chemistry. All parts must be used in the proper amounts to get the desired results. However, if you make the pancake batter by my recipe, but use buttermilk rather than milk, and add a tsp. or so of baking soda, then you have ballanced the acid/alkali ratio and the batter performs well.

I don't understand letting the batter rest. I allows much of the leavening action of chemical engredients to use themselves up. Its true that the second set of ingredients in double-acting baking powder are not activated until heat is applied. This second leavening action will allow the pancakes to rise. But why not get the benefit of both actions, creating a still flurfier product.

All I know is that at our anual church pancake breakfast, with home produced real maple syrup, my recipe is the only one they will use. I couldn't attend two years ago due to work requirements. I never heard so many complaints about pancakes. They insisted that I be there for the yearly pancake breadfast get-together. Kinda made me feel good.

Anyway, this is a good discussion thread. I'm seeing other recipes to try, some of which I know to be succesfull and popular. I know my recipe isn't the only valid, or even great recipe out there. I just know it's one of the great ones. And I got braggin' rights as it's mine and my daughters, even if others have used exactly the same recipe. We came up with it without help from others. We re-invented the wheel. The same it true of my egg-roll recipe. It's completely different than any I've had by anyone else. I and my family like it better. That doesn't mean that there aren't other great ones out there, and I understand that.

Food is a very personal thing as we all have our biases (impossible not to have one as we all have differing tastes and expectations based on our taste-bud sensitivity, regional preferences, what we are just plain used to, even such things as whether we like our meat a bit chewy, or almost mushy tender or crispy). I don't believe there is one "right" way to cook anything. What is incredible to me may be disgusting to you, and vice-versa. That's just the thing that makes cooking so great. There is enough variety in texture and flavor to satisfy every desire.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-06-2004, 09:27 AM   #30
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I sure am glad you started a topic on pancakes GoodWeed, because I have a question for ya: How do you make the edges of your pancakes crispy? My grandma used to make pancakes and they were perfect: light, fluffy, and crispy edges. When she died, i wasn't really in to cooking, so I never knew how she did it. She was also one to never right down her recipes, so it, of course, wasn't found. Do you have the answer GoodWeed?

I will definatley have to try your pancakes, because the ratings are awesome! lol. yours too Alix, they look a little simpler, so that's definatley a good reason to try them. Thanks in advance!
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