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Old 07-27-2009, 02:18 PM   #11
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I live on the east coast and have never seen abalone in our grocery stores. Is it sold to retail stores or only to high end restraunts?
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Old 07-27-2009, 02:26 PM   #12
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How taste is it?? I've never tried Abalone before. It's quiet expensive for me!!
See response #6 above.
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Old 07-27-2009, 02:32 PM   #13
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I live on the east coast and have never seen abalone in our grocery stores. Is it sold to retail stores or only to high end restraunts?
I believe abalone is strictly a Pacific Ocean thing. There was a time it was sold in some markets near the beach (I recall one little store in La Jolla that bought it from divers), but in the last 30 years or so it's been available mostly only in good seafood restaurants, AFAIK, or from the divers who catch it. There are severe limits these days on how many you can take, their size, etc., and the remaining abs tend to be in pretty deep water anymore.

There are a few "abalone farms," including this one on the Central Coast: The Abalone Farm - Cayucos, California - Featuring Ocean Rose Abalone However, I seem to recall that the farmed abs are on the small size because they grow so slowly.

Here's what you get for $75: "The 1 lb. Gift Pack includes 1 lb net weight of tenderized, vacuum packed abalone steaks, 4 cleaned abalone shells and recipes. Steaks are 1.0-1.25 oz each. This gift pack serves 2-4 people. Price does not include overnight shipping."
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Old 07-27-2009, 03:04 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Scotch View Post
I believe abalone is strictly a Pacific Ocean thing. There was a time it was sold in some markets near the beach (I recall one little store in La Jolla that bought it from divers), but in the last 30 years or so it's been available mostly only in good seafood restaurants, AFAIK, or from the divers who catch it. There are severe limits these days on how many you can take, their size, etc., and the remaining abs tend to be in pretty deep water anymore.

There are a few "abalone farms," including this one on the Central Coast: The Abalone Farm - Cayucos, California - Featuring Ocean Rose Abalone However, I seem to recall that the farmed abs are on the small size because they grow so slowly.

Here's what you get for $75: "The 1 lb. Gift Pack includes 1 lb net weight of tenderized, vacuum packed abalone steaks, 4 cleaned abalone shells and recipes. Steaks are 1.0-1.25 oz each. This gift pack serves 2-4 people. Price does not include overnight shipping."
OUCH!!
Wow that's expensive!! I think I'll stick with scallops
Thanks for the reply scotch.
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Old 07-30-2009, 06:28 PM   #15
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Here's a video slideshow for you:

How to prepare a fresh caught abalone and turn them into fork tender and mouth watering melt in your mouth abalone steaks:

Being a grandson of a Portugese woman, she showed me how to hit an abolone once, in the "star" of the muscle, and no pounding is necessary. You put 5 or 6 nails around the outside perimeter of the meat, then feel for the spot where all the muslces meet near or around the center of the body of the animal. Put your finger on that spot and hit it ONCE HARD with a hammer. Be sure to remove your finger just before you strike. Voilá. The muscles all relax and you will see the meat rise up on the nails.

Now you can really cut an abalone steak. Enjoy.
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Old 07-30-2009, 07:36 PM   #16
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Being a grandson of a Portugese woman, she showed me how to hit an abolone once, in the "star" of the muscle, and no pounding is necessary. You put 5 or 6 nails around the outside perimeter of the meat, then feel for the spot where all the muslces meet near or around the center of the body of the animal. Put your finger on that spot and hit it ONCE HARD with a hammer. Be sure to remove your finger just before you strike. Voilá. The muscles all relax and you will see the meat rise up on the nails.

Now you can really cut an abalone steak. Enjoy.
Marty
That may work, although I never could do it, nor could my dad, who hunted abs for 60 years. Moreover, I don't believe that there is a "spot where all the muscles meet" -- I'm pretty sure, based on having processed a few hundred of the things, that abalone have only one muscle, the foot muscle; one end attaches the animal to its shell and the other is used to attach the animal to a rock.

In any case, in my experience (and my dad's), whacking the muscle once it was removed from the shell and the guts had been trimmed away never caused it to relax very much, certainly not enough for eating. Rather, we sliced it and then pounded the slices to tenderize them, as you would a boneless chicken breast. Done properly, the meat is fork tender when cooked.

This is an interesting site with a lot of information about abalones, including some good photos:

Abalone: Introduction
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Old 07-30-2009, 08:17 PM   #17
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That may work, although I never could do it, nor could my dad, who hunted abs for 60 years. Moreover, I don't believe that there is a "spot where all the muscles meet" -- I'm pretty sure, based on having processed a few hundred of the things, that abalone have only one muscle, the foot muscle; one end attaches the animal to its shell and the other is used to attach the animal to a rock.

In any case, in my experience (and my dad's), whacking the muscle once it was removed from the shell and the guts had been trimmed away never caused it to relax very much, certainly not enough for eating. Rather, we sliced it and then pounded the slices to tenderize them, as you would a boneless chicken breast. Done properly, the meat is fork tender when cooked.

This is an interesting site with a lot of information about abalones, including some good photos:

Abalone: Introduction
Hi Scotch,
Well, I was taught how to "feel" that sweet spot. You move your fingers around the top of the nailed meet. If you pull up slightly you will find stands of connecting tissue between your fingers. They all meet in one spot somewhat centered. That is what my grandmother called "the star". That is the one spot you must hit exactly to relax all of the abalone's muscles and attachments. It works. Seen it. Done it recently.

Your and your dad's way works, too, but just more labor intensive. Plus, you have to beat your steaks pretty thin. With a good size abalone, you can get 2 inch thick steak slices, bigger than a calamari steak, using my grandma's technique. Remember, she was Portugese.

Unfortunately the big ones I remember as a kid are all gone. Near Fort Bragg, California, we used to pop them off the rocks using tire irons. Boy, were those the days for finding abs. We didn't over collect, but they were there for anyone who wanted them.

Marty
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Old 07-30-2009, 11:20 PM   #18
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That certainly sounds like a technique worth learning. I've never heard of anyone serving or eating a 2-inch-thick slice of ab. Perhaps you should make a YouTube video.
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