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Old 10-26-2012, 12:39 PM   #1
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Best fish for fish & chips?

We ate lunch at a fish & chips (don't remember the name) a few weeks ago. They had a great tasting fish. Wish I had asked what kind. It was a white fish, it was not cod but it tasted so close I could not tell the difference. They were wonderful, large, thick and white cuts of fish meat. Anyone have any idea what kind of fish that might have been? What kind of fish do you like fried? Thanks

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Old 10-26-2012, 12:43 PM   #2
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Haddock and pollack are common. Lots of others. In the better shops, it depends a lot on what's available locally.
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Old 10-26-2012, 01:42 PM   #3
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At most "fine dining" restaurants AKA local pubs that serve fish and chips or fish sandwiches, unless they specify, it's usally pollack from Alaska. And by "fine dining", I mean you can relax, put your elbows on the table and eat with your fingers. Local specialty fish is Minnesota Walleye, which we all know is imported from Canada.

Pollack is quite mild and tasty.

Call the restaurant and ask / or look at their menu on line if they have a website.
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Old 10-26-2012, 01:59 PM   #4
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I vote for Halibut.
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Old 10-26-2012, 02:06 PM   #5
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If it cost $15 or less, it's likely it was tilapia. Most tilapia sold in the U.S. is imported from China and since their environmental practices aren't very good, they're not the best choice. I would definitely ask the restaurant.
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Old 10-26-2012, 02:18 PM   #6
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You can use any type of white fish, but in the UK it's traditionally made from cod or haddock.

However, when it comes right down to it, any fish that's covered in batter and deep fried, is generally more about the batter and the accoutrements than the fish.
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Old 10-26-2012, 02:44 PM   #7
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I love a good Halibut fillet as my fish and chips, it's worth the price.
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Old 10-26-2012, 03:02 PM   #8
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I was going to mention both Haddock, and Pollack. Other good choices include red snapper, whitefish or walleye (Great Lakes fish), Jumbo Perch, small mouth bass, and Boston Blue Fish. If you want more flavor, but still fairly mild, fresh pink salmon is amazing, as are speckled trout fillets, or swordfish. Yellow fin tuna, if it's fresh is also good. Catfish, if caught in clean water, is mild and has the proper texture as well. Herring will work.

These fish will work, but will need to have the fatty parts removed:
Chinook Salmon, Lake Trout, Pike (can be very bony if not prepared right), sockey salmon, coho salmon, steelhead/rainbow trout, most tuna.

I've had battered pink salmon that had no fishy flavor, and was an absolute delight. I've also had salmon where the fatty meat from under the dorsal fin, and belly meat was left on. It was not good eating. Fish fat is very strong flavored, and isn't tasty to most people. Think cond-liver-oil flavor. Remove the fat, and sometimes the skin, and that same fish can be wonderful.

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Old 10-26-2012, 03:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salt and pepper View Post
I vote for Halibut.
If it was Halibut it would be very expensive meal.
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Old 10-26-2012, 07:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
If it was Halibut it would be very expensive meal.
Thank you everyone for your responses. It was not a very expensive meal, about $15 per person which I consider 'not cheap' for lunch but the food was great and the portions were fair sized. From the responses here I am thinking the fish was probably haddock or possibly halibut. Next time we go I will ask what kind of fish it is but the restaurant is 60 miles away so it will be awhile.
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