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Old 03-24-2008, 02:12 PM   #1
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Can prawn toast be simply fried?

hello,

i successfully made some prawn toast. i went to this chinese restaurant ordered some prawn toast to check out their ercipe, and feel that they had just fried, not deep fried the prawn toast.

is that another way of making it?

my prawn toast seemed to be a bit oily, is there a way to remove the oil from the prawn toast?

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Old 03-24-2008, 03:23 PM   #2
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I've never made prawn toast, so I'm not sure about the method, but I drain anything that's fried on paper towels. HTH.
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Old 03-24-2008, 05:05 PM   #3
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thanks for the reply,

i tried to drain it on paper towel but i felt that a bit of the oil was still present in the toast. can i lightly press the toasts to extricate the oil?
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Old 03-24-2008, 05:08 PM   #4
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I've read a recipe on the net, where they just pan fried it in a small amt. of oil, then briefly on the other side.
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Old 03-25-2008, 11:47 AM   #5
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Stick in the oven after draining and see how that goes. But you may want to get the oil hotter if it is absorbing too much oil.
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Old 03-25-2008, 05:57 PM   #6
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thanks for the advice,

i guess if the oil is too hot, then the tradeoff is that the inner portions of the prawn will be left a wee-bit uncooked but the upside is that the prawn toast is not that oily.
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Old 03-25-2008, 11:52 PM   #7
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What is prawn toast?????
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Old 03-26-2008, 12:44 AM   #8
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Sometimes it's called shrimp toast too. It looks like white bread (crust removed) made into a sandwich, cut in 1/4's (triangles), but you can't see the filling. It's then fried. The filling in between the slices is a mixture of prawns, finely minced, ginger, spring onion....you can find a number of recipes here. It's easier than me telling you.
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Old 03-26-2008, 05:45 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cooking_guy View Post
thanks for the advice,

i guess if the oil is too hot, then the tradeoff is that the inner portions of the prawn will be left a wee-bit uncooked but the upside is that the prawn toast is not that oily.
That's why you don't make it too thick with the filling. Just a slice of bread, spread of the mixture, liberal coating of sesame seeds and fry. The bread will fry quickly and the prawn mix won't take long either. If you make the filling too thick then you may have an issue with the cooking time.

Missing the original question in your first post, I guess you could shallow fry but you still need to get the oil hot enough. My inclination would be in this case, to put the toast in mixture side down so that cooks first and just be quick with it. You can then flip over and do the toast side and spend a bit more time on that side. But that's just a guess. Someone more experienced than I would best suggest the proper way to shallow fry it.

Likewise, you could do a variance and oven fry the toast but it won't taste the same.
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Old 03-26-2008, 05:47 AM   #10
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Cooking Guy, may we have your recipe to try, please?
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