"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Fish & Seafood
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-25-2005, 05:51 PM   #31
Certified Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 3,615
Thanks for your analysis Michael, job well done .
We have all forgotten that that same size can used to hold 8 oz, now the label reads 6 oz, a well placed dimple in the sides and a raised bottom to make us all think it is the same. I feel cheated. If I put onions, celery, mayo, and sometimes hard boiled egg I would get two or maybe three sandwiches out of it, and only one lunch if I do as I usually prefer, drain liquid, sprinkle tuna (still in can) with fresh ground pepper, lemon zest and lemon juice and eat directly from the can. In addition, I have been going through some old recipes from newspapers and in my older cookbooks and the tuna recipes call for 1 8oz or 1 7oz can.
__________________

__________________
norgeskog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2005, 07:00 PM   #32
Executive Chef
 
amber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 4,099
I like canned tuna, white, in spring water, but prefer it in oil which I cannot seem to find at my grocery store anymore. I usually buy starkist or chicken of the sea.
__________________

__________________
amber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2005, 07:53 PM   #33
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,834
We use Bumble Bee white albacore tuna - I think it tastes the best, but that may be just my opinion. I make my tuna salad with diced onion, apple, celery and mayo. and always water packed, only.
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2005, 02:01 AM   #34
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by HEAT
Are you a Food Scientist by trade? ...
No, I've just got a background in science and research (biochemistry, physiology, nutrition), and a bad habit of asking "why" way too many time. If I don't know the answer to a question - I know how to go find the answer, if there is one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock
... At any rate, the weight of the can isn't included on the label, and the brands I buy all list the drained weight.
True Rob, the weight of the can is not included on the label. The weight on the label only refelects the weight of the contents within the can. The reason I weighed the unopened can was to give me a reference point to make sure there was no evaporation ... if the empty can plus it's contents after draining didn't equal the unopened can .. I would need to try to figure out what happened with the experiment since can+tuna+water should equal the weight of the unopened can.

I don't know where you live in the USA - but if it's sold in the USA the weight on the can is the weight of the total contents in the can - not the dry/drained weight. A 6-oz can of tuna in water contains 6-oz of tuna + water. There IS however a clue as to the drained weight by looking at the nutritional information - at least for tuna. The serving size and servings per can gives a basic clue. For all three brands of canned tuna - the serving size is 2-oz. For the number of servings per can: Bumble Bee tuna was "variable", Albertson's was "about 2.5", and StarKist claimed 2.5. This would fit with the results of the experiment.

Rob, I hope you understand that I'm not picking on you ... just the idea that a 3-oz "pouch" of tuna contained twice as much tuna as a 6-oz "can".

Quote:
Originally Posted by norgeskog
We have all forgotten that that same size can used to hold 8 oz.
Actually, the old 8-oz tuna cans were a "little" bigger - about 1/2-inch in diameter and 1/4-1/2 inch in height. This observation has nothing to do with food history or science ... it has to do with amateur radio. I got the plans to build a low power 2-tube radio transmitter that was based on a tuna can chasis (from back in the late 1950's) and it wouldn't fit on a modern tuna can. I saw one at a ham convention a couple of years ago ... beside a "modern one" that was transistorized (using a 1995 tuna can) - there was a difference in the can sizes.

As prices went up - we got screwed around. Instead of increasing the prices, the producers (knowning we would scream about that) just reduced the amount we were getting - thinking we wouldn't notice. An 8-oz can of tuna became 6-oz .... and a 1-lb can of coffee shrank to 13-oz .. and it's getting smaller to about 11.5 oz.

CAN vs POUCH

This was only an experiment to see if a 3-oz pouch of tuna had twich as much tuna as a 6-oz can when drained. That is all! That question could be resolved by very simple scientific means.

Flavor and texture are another matter, as is the difference between Yellow Fin, Blue Fin and Albacore - dark, light and white meat - flake, chunk, or solid. These are subjective personal preferences - matters of personal taste and preference that can't be analyzed in a simple scientific experiment.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2005, 02:16 AM   #35
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Rob, I hope you understand that I'm not picking on you ... just the idea that a 3-oz "pouch" of tuna contained twice as much tuna as a 6-oz "can".
I'm baffled by this statement- I never said that! What I was trying to get across is that a 7 oz pouch is fairly close to two 6 oz cans. My comments compared one pouch to two cans of supposedly equal weights, not a 3 oz vs two 6 oz! The pouch stuff is packed in much less liquid vs the cans I've seen. At any rate, the drained weight of the canned stuff is printed on the label. But for that, you have to read it.

I agree that flavor is a subjective thing. But I theorize that most people 1) are very used to the taste of canned tuna and 2) have not eaten fresh tuna. I find the pouch kind to taste a lot more like tuna and less like cat food! Maybe the pouch isn't what people are used to, but to my palette it tastes more like the "real thing." YMMV, of course.

Not trying to bust your chops- just adding my 2 cents worth to "The Great Tuna Controversy"!
__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2005, 12:49 PM   #36
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: hollywood
Posts: 3
pouch fan here

I'm a convert. as canned tuna is so dreadful in the US (we get v.affordable Italian brands back in Australia, and even our local stuff is okay), I'm all for the ease of the pouch; less draining.

but, for anyone interested, I just found this tiny 'gourmet' brand. some guys in Portland who can the tuna in chardonnay or smoke it in the can...all sorts of flavours. v. delicious

mannix
__________________
mannix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2005, 05:48 PM   #37
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Yeah Rob - I'm in no way trying to bust any chops, either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock
I'm baffled by this statement- I never said that! What I was trying to get across is that a 7 oz pouch is fairly close to two 6 oz cans. My comments compared one pouch to two cans of supposedly equal weights, not a 3 oz vs two 6 oz! The pouch stuff is packed in much less liquid vs the cans I've seen.
Sorry for not understanding what you ment when you said ... "Look at the drained weight- at least where I shop, a pouch of tuna is roughly twice the price of a can, but the drained weight is twice as much, too."

Again, what caught my eye was the claim that pouch tuna yielded twice a much as caned. From the experiment, it turns out that canned tuna can have 20%-25% added water, depending on brand. So, assuming that pouch tuna contains no added water (but it's probably around 5%) and canned tuna contains 20%:

a 3-oz can of tuna would yield about 2.4 oz drained.
a 7-oz can of tuna would yield about 5.6 oz drained.

In neither case does a pouch of tuna compared to an equal pre-drained weight of canned tuna yield twice as much drained tuna.

I agree - canned tuna has more added water/oil than the pouch per total package weigh oz.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock
At any rate, the drained weight of the canned stuff is printed on the label. But for that, you have to read it.
I don't know where you live in the USA, or what brand your looking at, but the 3 brands I have do not tell me the drained weight of the can contents, per se. What they do tell me is that the nutritional information is based on a 2-oz serving of drained tuna, and that the can contains about 2.5 servings. While the nutritional information is based on an absolute of 2-oz drained tuna .... the servings per can is variable ... which makes the drained weight of the can also variable based on those two factors. Bumble Bee had the lowest drained yield of about 2.25 servings per can (4.5 oz) ... Starkist was closest to 2.5 (just a couple of grams shy of 5 oz).

Yes, I have eaten very fresh tuna ... no, I never tried tasting cat food.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2005, 06:02 PM   #38
Executive Chef
 
Bangbang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 3,150
The cheapest canned tuna I can find. I get it in water only
__________________

__________________
You are not drunk if you can lie on the floor without holding on.
Bangbang is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.