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Old 04-02-2011, 10:41 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Trade you maple syrup for some gravlaks <g>. I can meet you in C'wall.
I'll probably try gravad trout next. I don't think it's as expensive as salmon. Since smoked trout is yummers, it should be good gravad.

BTW, I hate cooked salmon and cooked trout.
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:42 PM   #32
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Oh--I can get smoked trout at the locker plant...I could make this for Easter while I'm at my folks! Great idea!
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Old 04-02-2011, 11:35 PM   #33
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Yup, I'm concerned too. That's why I freeze any fish that I'm going to use raw. A week in a home deep freezer should do it. It takes much less time in really cold commercial freezers. I googled this a while back, since I love gravad laks.
For freezing fish, being frozen does not actually kill any bacteria that may be present in the fish, but instead stops its growth, so freezing inferior grades of fish will not make it 'safe' to consume raw, the bacteria will still be there.

In regards to the farm raised fish, I wasn't talking about nice fish farms that actually take the time to give the fish natural food that it would typically eat in the wild, but rather the fish farms who are about mass-production. Most frozen shrimp you buy at a store, that come in a box are shipped over from Thailand which is the breeding ground for 80 to 90 percent of commercial seafood species..the improper production methods have devastated the natural areas surrounding Thailand and ways of production..which means who knows what we have been eating..
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Old 04-02-2011, 11:37 PM   #34
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i also love smoked fish! smoked salmon is amazing... My buddy had smoked a bluefish, which has a high oil content, and i had never really thought about a bluefish as something i would want to eat, and maaaannnnn.... delish!
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Old 04-02-2011, 11:45 PM   #35
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For freezing fish, being frozen does not actually kill any bacteria that may be present in the fish, but instead stops its growth, so freezing inferior grades of fish will not make it 'safe' to consume raw, the bacteria will still be there.

In regards to the farm raised fish, I wasn't talking about nice fish farms that actually take the time to give the fish natural food that it would typically eat in the wild, but rather the fish farms who are about mass-production. Most frozen shrimp you buy at a store, that come in a box are shipped over from Thailand which is the breeding ground for 80 to 90 percent of commercial seafood species..the improper production methods have devastated the natural areas surrounding Thailand and ways of production..which means who knows what we have been eating..
The point of freezing fish for uncooked dishes is to kill parasites. Of course it doesn't kill bacteria. Freezing just stops bacteria from growing while they are frozen.

And I seldom eat fish because I don't live close enough to the ocean to get fresh fish that I consider fresh. I used to eat frozen fish 'til I found out that most of it is from Asia. They won't allow most of the farmed fish from Asia to be sold in the EU.

It's a shame that eating fish requires so much research. I miss it.
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Old 04-02-2011, 11:52 PM   #36
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Agreed! It def makes things tougher.. But better knowing than to go at it blindly...

Now how about raw chicken?? When I cook with it I am a sanitation freak, and cooking it to a well done point that doesnt over cook it and dry it out... But I also heard of people getting really high grade chicken and being able to eat it sashimi style and raw... My instructor said he did it in Europe, not sure where... also heard of it in NYC... I am not the kind of person about to try something like this.. My stepdad had a run in with some raw chicken and it got the better of him
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Old 04-03-2011, 12:12 AM   #37
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Agreed! It def makes things tougher.. But better knowing than to go at it blindly...

Now how about raw chicken?? When I cook with it I am a sanitation freak, and cooking it to a well done point that doesnt over cook it and dry it out... But I also heard of people getting really high grade chicken and being able to eat it sashimi style and raw... My instructor said he did it in Europe, not sure where... also heard of it in NYC... I am not the kind of person about to try something like this.. My stepdad had a run in with some raw chicken and it got the better of him
Don't get me started about chicken. Most of the problem has to do with how the carcasses are handled at the abattoirs. In most modern, North American abbatoirs they kill and gut the birds and then dip them in cold water to cool the birds. But, lots of birds get dipped in the same cold water. If one bird's guts were pierced or broken, that gets into the water and contaminates all the other birds. I believe it's the same problem with beef and pork.

Someone did a study and the average home has more E. coli on their kitchen counters than on their toilet seats. E. coli is associated with feces.

That's the main reason why we have to treat our meat as though it were medical waste.
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Old 04-03-2011, 01:03 AM   #38
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Good morning Tax, first off how do you make your mustard and dill sauce for the Grav?
2nd I was on a cruise ship in Miami and the bowls of peanuts on the bars were tested, 75 different strains of urine, 13 different strains of faeces
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Old 04-03-2011, 06:44 AM   #39
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This is how we make our mustard and dill sauce:

1 T oil
1 T vinegar
1/3 tsp salt
pepper
2-3 T mustard (dry)
2-3 T sugar
LOTS of fresh, minced dill

A friend of mine mixes 2/3 c mayo to 1/3 c Dijon and tons of fresh, minced dill
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Old 04-03-2011, 09:17 AM   #40
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I watched a documentary about lemons in restaurants and how this organization tested 20 restaurants and over 3/4 lemons had feces and other raw meat detected on them.. Mostly due to not cleaning cutting boards or knifes used to cut other items and then used to cut lemons... Like trimming and cleaning a chicken and then with same tools cutting lemons for water....what!!?! I've also heard of people cutting lemons on the back of servers trays... So dirty with all the hands that hold that side.... The video was pretty gross
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citruis, history, recipe, shrimp, vegetables

Ceviche, Cebiche, Seviche [B]Shrimp Ceviche (Cebiche or Seviche)[/B] [B]An international seafood dish that originated in South/Central Americas, Latin & Caribbean cultures. Ceviche must be prepared fresh and strictly using only fresh ingredients to prevent food poisoning. Ceviche is made from raw fish that is marinated in citrus juice, with no cooking involved. The citrus acids will actually “cook” the fish in the marinade. Citrus juices used are anything involving acidic fruits, most popular are lemon and lime juice, but also include grapefruit juice and orange juice. There are several different types of variations of ceviche and have been dated back to nearly 2000 years ago. Ceviche is marinated in a citrus-based mixture, and the acids from the citrus make the proteins in the fish to become denatured and like alcohol, will kill any cell activity and problems dealing with food poisoning. Classically, it was told to let the diced fish rest in the acids for about 3 hours, but commonly today when you add the diced fish to the acids, by the time you add the rest of the ingredients, combine and serve to the table the dish will be perfect for consumption. Ceviche is commonly used with white fish, not fish with a dark, or red color of flesh. For example, you would make ceviche from shrimp, lobster, scallops, etc. and not from a tuna. Typically when the fish is marinated in the acids, the fish will turn a pale white color instead of being translucent, so if you used a red-fleshed fish, it would turn brown like an avocado or an apple would when exposed to air. [/B][B] ErikDowellCulinary.Tumblr.com or twitter- ErikFDowell.[/B] [B][U]Shrimp Ceviche[/U][/B] [B]2 lbs Shrimp. Peeled, and De-veined[/B] [B]2-3 Tomatoes, small dice[/B] [B]1/2 of a Red Onion, small dice[/B] [B]1 Cucumber, small dice[/B] [B]12 lemons, juiced[/B] [B]6 limes, juiced[/B] [B]2 oranges, juiced[/B] [B]1 tsp. Apple Cider Vinegar [/B] [B]2 tbsp. oil [/B] [B]1 bundle of Cilantro, finely chopped[/B] [B]1 Jalepeno pepper, small dice (keep the seeds in if you like spicy, take the seeds out if you like it less spicy)[/B] [B]1/2 of a Red Bell Pepper, small dice[/B] [B]1/2 of a yellow Bell Pepper, small dice[/B] [B]1 Serano Pepper, small dice[/B] [B][U]Procedure[/U][/B] [B]1.)[FONT="] [/FONT][/B][B]Peel, De-Vein and chop the shrimp into small pieces. Use fresh shrimp from the market, or in the deli case in your super market, not frozen! (1/4-1/2 inch pieces, medium-large dice) and place into a tall bowl or even a large ziplock bag.[/B] [B]2.)[FONT="] [/FONT][/B][B]Juice the lemons, limes, and oranges and place the juice into the bowl or large ziplock bag and cover. Place in the Refrigerator for 2-3 hours.[/B] [B]3.)[FONT="] [/FONT][/B][B]In a seperate bowl, combine all of the other ingredients…[/B] [B]4.)[FONT="] [/FONT][/B][B]Small dice: the tomatoes, onion, peppers, & cucumber and finely chop the bunch of cilantro and combine.[/B] [B]5.)[FONT="] [/FONT][/B][B]Add the apple cider vinegar and oil.[/B] [B]6.)[FONT="] [/FONT][/B][B]Once the shrimp have reached a pale, white color, marry the two mixtures together.. Depending on how you want it, first strain the liquid from the shrimp into another bowl. Once you add the shrimp and toss it together, check the taste and consistency… You can add more of the juice that you strained off, or not. [/B] [B] [/B] [B][FONT="]…Apparently the juice leftover from ceviche is a magical hangover cure, I have not tested this but please feel free to get back to me about that and let me know! [/FONT][/B] 3 stars 1 reviews
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