"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Fish & Seafood
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-17-2014, 02:25 PM   #31
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
At least the clams are clean shaven!

Everything I have read talks about one soaking, some say a * of corn meal some don't.

Good luck, make sure you give us a full report!
* here they recommend flour - presumably because corn meal isn't a store cupboard regular here
__________________

__________________
Donít look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2014, 02:33 PM   #32
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
There are so many ways and myths floating about regarding purging clams, mussels, etc. Some swear by cornmeal, others use oatmeal and some use nothing. Common sense will tell you what to do.

Does cornmeal or oatmeal grow in the ocean? Of course not.

A simple soaking in very salty water for about 30 minutes is fine. Clams live burrowed in the sand. Mussels cling (hence the beard) to rocks and eat what is floating by. They don't get as sandy as clams. But if you want, a short soaking in salty water for a short time is fine. It certainly won't hurt them.

You never want to soak any seafood in fresh water. Crazy as it may sound, they will drown and die on you. They cannot breath in fresh water. And your fresh water from the tap has chlorine in it. A chemical that is not conducive to happy living for small live sea animals.

If you are going to use wine or some other alcohol product in you final dish, make sure you cook off the alcohol before you add the seafood to the dish. Alcohol often has a way of making the little critters become tough.

When you are removing the meat from the shells, do so over a clean bowl so you can catch every drop of liquor. Before you add that delicious juice to your final dish, strain it through a really fine mesh strainer with a cheesecloth placed inside. It will catch the last bit of sand. Place the meat from the shells in that liquor also so you can give them a final rinse.

The water that you steamed the clams or mussels in also has great flavor. Do no waste it. That too should be strained before adding it to your final recipe.

When you buy seashells by the bag, there should be a tag on it stating where and when they were dug. Save this tag in the event all of them were dead by the time you got them home or you became sick. The information will be very helpful to the authorities.

Make sure you only make your purchases from a reputable vendor. If you see someone selling the at the side of the road from the back of his truck, I can almost guarantee that person is a poacher and does not have a license for clam digging. And more than likely, the clams are not sitting on a bed of ice.

Here hoping you enjoy your meal of seafood and are happy as a clam.
Thanks for that, Addie. I've saved it to my food file.

I've only bought "live" mussels once and they weren't! Two big bags full and only 2 live mussels! Supposedly reputable fishmonger, pre-ordered mussels, used the same day but still dead. I tend to buy frozen ones now for paella. Not as good but better if you see what I mean.
__________________

__________________
Donít look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2014, 02:38 PM   #33
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
This is an outstanding way to steam mussels. Karen does not like licorice flavored liquors, but love's these mussels. Need lots of crusty bread for sopping.

Carrabbas Mussels Cozze Bianco Recipe - Food.com
Sounds good however, don't worry about Karen not liking licorice as Pernod is aniseed. Not the same thing at all.
__________________
Donít look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2014, 02:41 PM   #34
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,777
I think water movement is probably the key to purging clams. Not much to filter feed during a slack tide.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2014, 02:46 PM   #35
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Sounds good however, don't worry about Karen not liking licorice as Pernod is aniseed. Not the same thing at all.
I said licorice flavored and anise has that same flavor. Fennel has a licorice flavor. Some say basil has a slight licorice flavor.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2014, 04:33 PM   #36
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,017
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Thanks for that, Addie. I've saved it to my food file.

I've only bought "live" mussels once and they weren't! Two big bags full and only 2 live mussels! Supposedly reputable fishmonger, pre-ordered mussels, used the same day but still dead. I tend to buy frozen ones now for paella. Not as good but better if you see what I mean.
I have lived real close to the ocean all my life. As a kid we always brought our pail with us as it was war time and meat was rationed. There we no laws then so we could dig to our hearts content. So while we were having fun in the sun, we were always digging for clams to bring home for supper. After a Nor'easter, all the kids would rush to the beach and pick up all the lobsters that got washed up on shore. Today, I can't stand lobster. Had more than my fill. And then on top of all that, I ended up marrying two fishermen.

Glad to be of help.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2014, 06:01 PM   #37
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: va by way of upstate ny
Posts: 4,442
addie, following internet instructions, i cleansed my mussels in cold tap water. it was for scarcely a half hour, though, and i only had four mussels (out of about 5 dozen) that failed to open when i steamed them.
__________________
vitauta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2014, 11:03 PM   #38
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,017
Quote:
Originally Posted by vitauta View Post
addie, following internet instructions, i cleansed my mussels in cold tap water. it was for scarcely a half hour, though, and i only had four mussels (out of about 5 dozen) that failed to open when i steamed them.
Shellfish can not breath in fresh water. So they end up drowning. Plus there is chlorine in fresh water that they can not tolerate. Always soak in heavily salt water. Make it close to the salinity of the sea. Had you use the salt water more would probably have survived.

If your shellfish are open when you get them, tap them lightly. They should close. They are alive. If they fail to respond, alas, more than likely they have gone to Davy Jones's locker.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2014, 11:47 AM   #39
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,017
I can't say this strongly enough. Shellfish need to be soaked in heavily salted water.Shellfish cannot breath in fresh water. And yes they do breath. Those bubble you see coming up through the sand are the shellfish breathing. That is how clammers find the clams and other shellfish. Once you get them home, scrub their shells good. For mussels, remove their beard. The beard is what they use to cling to rocks and other items with. Place them on a very wet towel in a drawer in the fridge if you are not going to use them immediately. Make sure you do use them the next day.

I don't care what the Internet says or any professional chef that grew up on a corn farm in Iowa. You can put cornmeal or oatmeal in the water if you want to. Personally I fail to see the need for it. But you can't soak them in fresh water. If the water is salty enough, they will purge themselves anyway. It is in their nature to do so.

I use sea salt. I know it is a more expensive product than table salt. Not everyone can afford it. I try to emulate their natural habitat. With summer just around the corner, we will all be looking at more shellfish.

In the event you hear about the dreaded "Red Tide," take heed. Local news station are pretty good about reporting it. Most stores will stop selling shellfish. If they don't ask the vendor where were they caught. Or check the tag yourself. Here on the East Coast, Red Tide usually starts up north and works it way down south. So when I hear that it has struck the Maine coastline, I know it is coming our way. If I am going shopping, I take note and pay close attention to what I am purchasing. I read the tag.

Red tide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It kills shellfish and can make a human very, very ill if they choose to swim in it.

I am no expert. I am just very knowledgeable regarding this subject. Since I was born, I have lived by the sea and lived on sea food all my life. I learned at the knees of local fishermen and clammers. I brought home hundreds of clams and mussels as a kid during the war. I watched my mother go over them one by one. Tapping each open one. Some were tossed, but as time went on, more were edible. I learned to tap the open ones at the beach so I wouldn't be bring home dead ones. I learned to cover the clams with salt water while I was digging for more. They would start their purging then. You could see the bubbles in the pail.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2014, 08:48 PM   #40
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
I said licorice flavored and anise has that same flavor. Fennel has a licorice flavor. Some say basil has a slight licorice flavor.
In that case "some" have seriously disturbed taste buds. Ditto the people who think fennel tastes of liquorice.

Liquorice and anise are NOT the same flavour at all neither are they related in botanical terms. I like one and not the other.
__________________

__________________
Donít look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
clams, cooking, recipe

Cooking clams at home? I would like to steam a dozen clams for myself now that I have seen pac's clambake. I have never cooked a small amount indoors and I could use some tips or a TNT method. Also I am wondering what are the best types of clams, likely to be found in the supermarket. Do small amounts of clams from the grocery store require cleaning or purging similar to the process used in cleaning large amounts? Could I just lay them in a frying pan and add a little water, butter etc and just bring to a boil for a few minutes. I know how to melt the butter and open the beer, it's the rest of the process that confuses me. :ermm::ohmy::lol: Any help would be appreciated! Thanks, B 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.