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Old 02-17-2015, 04:09 PM   #31
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Come on people, quite snipping at each other. What is the "right" way to cook any food? The way that results in a food YOU enjoy eating. You know, you say "poTAYto, I say "poTAHto". Cook it the way you like. YMMV.*


*Your Mileage May Vary
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Old 02-17-2015, 04:14 PM   #32
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Yes, I've had a Cajun shrimp boil! My mother was Cajun (100%) and to my grandmother English was a second language with Cajun being her native tongue! I still have a large maternal family in Louisiana and I been to MANY shrimp/crawdad/'gater/oyster and general seafood boils. The shrimp is added AFTER the kettle stops boiling. The crawdads simmer for one minute and then steep.
It makes the difference between chewing an automobile rubber shock absorber or a tender piece of cod.
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Old 02-17-2015, 05:54 PM   #33
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Come on people, quite snipping at each other. What is the "right" way to cook any food? The way that results in a food YOU enjoy eating. You know, you say "poTAYto, I say "poTAHto". Cook it the way you like. YMMV.*

*Your Mileage May Vary
Yes, there may be no right or wrong way however, there are ways of getting the best out of the food you cook with.
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Old 02-17-2015, 07:37 PM   #34
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Meant to add a pic.
Looks yummy Cheryl...
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Old 02-17-2015, 07:58 PM   #35
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Thanks, Joey.

I'm with those who have said there are so many different ways to cook/bake/steam/simmer/grill, etc., shrimp. I've prepared and eaten shrimp so many ways. There isn't any one 'right' way.

I don't know much about it, but I've always thought a good ol' low country boil would be so much fun - lots of goodies, newspapers on the outdoor tables, plenty of napkins, and good company. Sounds like my kind of meal.
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Old 02-17-2015, 08:43 PM   #36
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Thanks, Joey.

I'm with those who have said there are so many different ways to cook/bake/steam/simmer/grill, etc., shrimp. I've prepared and eaten shrimp so many ways. There isn't any one 'right' way.

I don't know much about it, but I've always thought a good ol' low country boil would be so much fun - lots of goodies, newspapers on the outdoor tables, plenty of napkins, and good company. Sounds like my kind of meal.
So right Cheryl. Every year my sister and I would go to the yacht club for their lobster boil. Two huge lobsters, corn, red potatoes, Cole slaw and each year the dessert would change. Another plus is you could go up for seconds as long as the food held out. Of course most folks went for seconds on the lobsters. I was always more interested in collecting the shells for a seafood broth. My two, my sister's three or more, and any others I could collect. I never came home with less than 10 to 15 shells. They made the most delicious broth you could imagine. I let it boil down to almost a paste. It was so intense in flavor, all you needed was a large tablespoon for whatever you were going to put it in. My daughter used to use it for her marinara sauce. My sister had a huge appetite and would get seconds on everything except the Cole slaw. Now that is one of my most favorite foods. How could she not like Cole slaw!
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:47 AM   #37
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I guess everyone knows that the shells and heads of prawns make a great fish stock? I have read that a 20 minute simmer is sufficient i.e. going over this makes the fish stock milky and bitter (I realise this may refer to fish bones though).
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Old 02-18-2015, 09:27 AM   #38
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I guess everyone knows that the shells and heads of prawns make a great fish stock? I have read that a 20 minute simmer is sufficient i.e. going over this makes the fish stock milky and bitter (I realise this may refer to fish bones though).
Any time my sister would make fish chowder, she would always toss a couple of fish frames into the stock.
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Old 02-18-2015, 09:52 AM   #39
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One of my favorite preparations of those huge prawns is to butterfly and stuff with crab. Basically a crab cake mixture minus the filler. Lightly broiled.

Fresh corn on the cob, hush puppies, slaw. Eatin' doesn't get much better than that.

And, of course, a good, not too hoppy, micro.
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Old 02-18-2015, 11:00 AM   #40
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Yes, I've had a Cajun shrimp boil! My mother was Cajun (100%) and to my grandmother English was a second language with Cajun being her native tongue! I still have a large maternal family in Louisiana and I been to MANY shrimp/crawdad/'gater/oyster and general seafood boils. The shrimp is added AFTER the kettle stops boiling. The crawdads simmer for one minute and then steep.
It makes the difference between chewing an automobile rubber shock absorber or a tender piece of cod.
This is just nuts. Sorry but there is definitely more than one way to cook these tasy morsels. I agree that you have to be a bit more careful with larger prawns, but with the shrimp that most of us typically have available from the supermarket, it's just not that touchy. I made shrimp cocktail for our hors d'oevres on Valentines day. I put the pot to a rolling boil, then added the cold (not frozen) shrimp. I removed them after about one minute, chilled them in cold water then into the freezer for 15 minutes. They were perfectly cooked and nicely chilled and went very well with the Shannon Ridge Cabernet that we drank with them.

Boiling did not make them tough or rubbery. It isn't the boiling that does that, it's overcooking that does it. When I make my version of jambalaya, I add shrimp at the very last. After living in the Bahamas for 2 years, and eating a lot of conch, I know what rubbery is. Conch can turn into pure latex if held too close to a match. It's best eaten raw after a few minutes spent marinating in a bit of lime juice.

Crack conch is very good, battered and deep fried, but it has to be pounded nearly to death before cooking to be edible. Conch fritters can be good, but the conch in them can be very tough. The conch I've had in Chicken and conch souse and in conch and rice is added right at the end to just warm it and keep it tender.

By the way Addie, I don't generally eat raw seafood either. Seviche is not high on my list of good eats, and I've never even entered a sushi bar. The raw conch was different because it was no more than 5 minutes from the live animal on the ocean bottom to being passed around for a beach munchy. For, conch eaten on the beach or on a boat, the setting is part of the experience. It would probably not be as interesting if eaten while sitting in a Colorado restaurant, even assuming that you could find such a thing here.
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