"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Fish & Seafood
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-24-2011, 10:13 AM   #1
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,794
Crawfish Boil

It is getting to that time of year when the peak of crawfish season is upon us. I really like this recipe for boiling them.

Cooking Crawfish
by Leonce Collins
How to boil crawfish Cajun style!
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
This will feed 8 people, or three Cajuns.

Equiment needed: One large cooking pot with wire basket big enough to hold 25 pounds of Crawfish. A lid for the pot and a small outdoor propane cooker, as you will cook this outside.
Go buy several cases of cold beer and drink the first one.

Then go shopping for 25# sack of live Crawfish, 3 bags of crab boil, 1 small bottle of liquid crab boil, 3 round boxes of salt, 1 square box of rock salt, 8 small onions, 8 small potatoes and 8 ears of corn, one head fresh garlic, small can of cayenne pepper, 4 lemons, and a box of Tony Chachere's creole seasoning. Now that you're finished shopping, drink another beer.

Now it's time to go to work cooking the Crawfish! One thing you must always remember about Crawfish....first separate the live Crawfish from the Crawfish that won't make it to the pot. Next you must purge the Crawfish. Get a large tub of water or two large ice chests. You will use this to purge the crawfish. Place the box of rock salt in the water. Stir the water with the salt and then place the Crawfish into the water. Let the Crawfish purge for 7 minutes. Remove the Crawfish and place in an ice chest until ready to cook. Time to drink another beer.

Fill the pot with fresh water half full, place on cooker, and start the fire. Place a box and a half of salt into the water, 1 bag of crab boil, a half bottle of liquid crab boil, 2 teaspoons of cayenne pepper and two lemons cut in half--squeeze each half into the pot and drop the lemon. Separate the garlic into pods and cut the small ends of each garlic pod, then drop them into pot. Place lid on pot. Time to drink another beer.

Let the water come to a boil for two minutes--that way the spices will mix well. Drop the 8 onions after cutting the ends--yes, drop the whole onion into the pot--4 minutes later, drop the 8 small potatoes; 4 minutes later, drop the 8 corns. Let it cook for five minutes. A good way to check for readiness is to take a fork or sharp knife and stab the potatoes and the onion. If it goes in easy, it is cooked. Lower the fire on the burner and remove the basket. Place the vegetable in a small clean ice chest--don't close the lid, just place foil on top. Place the basket back in the pot. Time to drink another beer.

Turn the heat up on the burner, place the other two bags of crab boil in the pot, the rest of the liquid crab boil, and one large heaping teaspoon of cayenne pepper. Take the rest of the lemons cut in half, squeeze each half into the pot and drop the lemon. Place the last two boxes of salt into the water. When the water comes to a boil, place the Crawfish into the basket and place lid on top. Time for another beer.

When the water comes back to a boil--you need to watch this part-- let it boil for 4 minutes, turn the fire off, let it simmer for 3 minutes, and remove.
Now get an old table, and place old newspaper on top. Dump the basket of Crawfish on top of the newspaper, and sprinkle with Tony Chachere's creole seasoning. Dump the onions, potatoes, corn and garlic on top of the Crawfish. Now it's time to really drink beer and eat. You will love the vegetables, and you can cook them this way without having to cook Crawfish! Hope you pass a good time eating the Crawfish!

I suggest that you make a sauce on the side using mayo, tomato ketchup, a little Worcestershire sauce, and little garlic power. Mix this to your liking. Use the sauce to dip your peeled Crawfish into if you desire.

Craig

__________________

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 10:17 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Hoot's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: The edge of the Great Dismal Swamp
Posts: 3,308
That sounds mighty good! It kinda reminds me of a Frogmore stew, only cajun style.
__________________

__________________
Hoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 10:22 AM   #3
Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: New Iberia, Louisiana
Posts: 83
LOL! Other than all the salt sounds like you are right here in the heart LA.

Oh, by the way if you put all that salt in just buy more beer!
__________________
LindaLou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 10:29 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaLou View Post
LOL! Other than all the salt sounds like you are right here in the heart LA.

Oh, by the way if you put all that salt in just buy more beer!
I really don't use salt, except to purge the mudbugs, just picked this recipe for the beer! Abita beer that is! Amber, Purple Haze, Turbo Dog etc.

Craig
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 10:35 AM   #5
Senior Cook
 
BigAL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: W.KS
Posts: 417
what is a "round box"?

Does sound like alot of salt, but worth a try.(I don't think I do anything the same way twice)

I hope we get rain today and tomorrow cause we need it and I'm really jones'n for another boil.

Thanks, Craig!
__________________
BigAL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2011, 12:54 PM   #6
Cook
 
infinitecookbook's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: South Florida
Posts: 98
Nice one. If I can add to this my 2 cents... A few cajun secrets to consider in this are celery salt and Worcestershire sauce in the boil itself. Those two ingredients seem to be an important key factor in the authentic taste of New Orleans Crawfish. Less cayenne which can mask the flavor with "blow your head off" spice which some places (the few that make Crawfish) do outside of New Orleans (there's a Cajun place here in Ft. Lauderdale that tends to do that unfortunately).

Another thing that really helps them taste amazing is to cook them and serve them the next day after they've been soaking in the juices in a bag or bowl overnight (and I usually add some Worcestershire sauce to that too after the boil). This way if you're really going to get into it and "suck the head" (which is a New Orleans traditional thing to do) then it really has some juice and the right amount of kick vs. flavor.
__________________
infinitecookbook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2011, 01:29 PM   #7
Senior Cook
 
texherp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Nacogdoches, TX
Posts: 112
Our peak crawfish season came and went over a month ago. Ya'll must use different cropping system than us.
__________________
-AJ
texherp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2011, 03:49 PM   #8
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,794
None of my cajun friends or cajun SIL and his family add worchestershire nor celery salt (unless there is some in the Chacheres) to there boils. You ever tried to tell a cajun they have to wait till tomorrow?

You mention a place in Ft. Lauderdale. Are you talking about Rosie Baby in Lauderhill?

Craig
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2011, 04:17 PM   #9
Cook
 
infinitecookbook's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: South Florida
Posts: 98
Yes, Rosie Baby. Fun little place that I like anyway but unfortunately they don't make their Po Boys, Seafood Gumbo or Crawfish quite like it is popularly done in New Orleans. If it was I'd go there more often. It's cool that they even HAVE crawfish there but from my experience they were exactly what I'd call "blow your head off"-spicy and that to me ruins it. Way too much cayenne.

I used to live in New Orleans and when we moved back to Florida we missed the seafood so much we ordered Crawfish shipped in dry ice from a popular restaurant there called Deanie's. We stopped ordering it once my brother and I finally figured out how to make the creole crabs, shrimp and crawfish boils taste like they do from Deanie's. Pretty close anyway. The three things I mentioned were key elements. Celery salt, Worcestershire and letting it soak in the juices overnight.

I forget how we found out but I vaguely recall someone telling us those were important secret ingredients that not everyone knew. But, really, the best way to tell is by taste comparison. Deanie's has a website where you can order crawfish (when it's in season ;) ) and many other things (gumbo, etouffe etc.) shipped in dry ice. Deanie's is an excellent example of authentic cajun seafood. So, tweaking one's own crawfish boil until it tastes more like the one from Deanie's is in my opinion not a bad way to get closer. That's what we did.
__________________
infinitecookbook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2011, 04:35 PM   #10
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by infinitecookbook View Post
Yes, Rosie Baby. Fun little place that I like anyway but unfortunately they don't make their Po Boys, Seafood Gumbo or Crawfish quite like it is popularly done in New Orleans. If it was I'd go there more often. It's cool that they even HAVE crawfish there but from my experience they were exactly what I'd call "blow your head off"-spicy and that to me ruins it. Way too much cayenne.

I used to live in New Orleans and when we moved back to Florida we missed the seafood so much we ordered Crawfish shipped in dry ice from a popular restaurant there called Deanie's. We stopped ordering it once my brother and I finally figured out how to make the creole crabs, shrimp and crawfish boils taste like they do from Deanie's. Pretty close anyway. The three things I mentioned were key elements. Celery salt, Worcestershire and letting it soak in the juices overnight.

I forget how we found out but I vaguely recall someone telling us those were important secret ingredients that not everyone knew. But, really, the best way to tell is by taste comparison. Deanie's has a website where you can order crawfish (when it's in season ;) ) and many other things (gumbo, etouffe etc.) shipped in dry ice. Deanie's is an excellent example of authentic cajun seafood. So, tweaking one's own crawfish boil until it tastes more like the one from Deanie's is in my opinion not a bad way to get closer. That's what we did.
I order a sack or two each season, when I can afford it. The cost of the live crawfish is usually around $1.99 lb and with overnight airport to airport freight it is cheaper than buying them at the local seafood place that brings them in. Since FLL is close, I just pick them up there.

Since I make my own Andouille and Tasso, I prefer to make my own cajun and creole dishes. Homemade is always better,IMO.

Craig
__________________

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
recipe

Crawfish Boil It is getting to that time of year when the peak of crawfish season is upon us. I really like this recipe for boiling them.:wink: [SIZE=2]Cooking Crawfish by Leonce Collins How to boil crawfish Cajun style!   --------------------------------------------------------------------------------   This will feed 8 people, or three Cajuns. Equiment needed: One large cooking pot with wire basket big enough to hold 25 pounds of Crawfish. A lid for the pot and a small outdoor propane cooker, as you will cook this outside. Go buy several cases of cold beer and drink the first one. Then go shopping for 25# sack of live Crawfish, 3 bags of crab boil, 1 small bottle of liquid crab boil, 3 round boxes of salt, 1 square box of rock salt, 8 small onions, 8 small potatoes and 8 ears of corn, one head fresh garlic, small can of cayenne pepper, 4 lemons, and a box of Tony Chachere's creole seasoning. Now that you're finished shopping, drink another beer. Now it's time to go to work cooking the Crawfish! One thing you must always remember about Crawfish....first separate the live Crawfish from the Crawfish that won't make it to the pot. Next you must purge the Crawfish. Get a large tub of water or two large ice chests. You will use this to purge the crawfish. Place the box of rock salt in the water. Stir the water with the salt and then place the Crawfish into the water. Let the Crawfish purge for 7 minutes. Remove the Crawfish and place in an ice chest until ready to cook. Time to drink another beer. Fill the pot with fresh water half full, place on cooker, and start the fire. Place a box and a half of salt into the water, 1 bag of crab boil, a half bottle of liquid crab boil, 2 teaspoons of cayenne pepper and two lemons cut in half--squeeze each half into the pot and drop the lemon. Separate the garlic into pods and cut the small ends of each garlic pod, then drop them into pot. Place lid on pot. Time to drink another beer. Let the water come to a boil for two minutes--that way the spices will mix well. Drop the 8 onions after cutting the ends--yes, drop the whole onion into the pot--4 minutes later, drop the 8 small potatoes; 4 minutes later, drop the 8 corns. Let it cook for five minutes. A good way to check for readiness is to take a fork or sharp knife and stab the potatoes and the onion. If it goes in easy, it is cooked. Lower the fire on the burner and remove the basket. Place the vegetable in a small clean ice chest--don't close the lid, just place foil on top. Place the basket back in the pot. Time to drink another beer. Turn the heat up on the burner, place the other two bags of crab boil in the pot, the rest of the liquid crab boil, and one large heaping teaspoon of cayenne pepper. Take the rest of the lemons cut in half, squeeze each half into the pot and drop the lemon. Place the last two boxes of salt into the water. When the water comes to a boil, place the Crawfish into the basket and place lid on top. Time for another beer. When the water comes back to a boil--you need to watch this part-- let it boil for 4 minutes, turn the fire off, let it simmer for 3 minutes, and remove. Now get an old table, and place old newspaper on top. Dump the basket of Crawfish on top of the newspaper, and sprinkle with Tony Chachere's creole seasoning. Dump the onions, potatoes, corn and garlic on top of the Crawfish. Now it's time to really drink beer and eat. You will love the vegetables, and you can cook them this way without having to cook Crawfish! Hope you pass a good time eating the Crawfish! I suggest that you make a sauce on the side using mayo, tomato ketchup, a little Worcestershire sauce, and little garlic power. Mix this to your liking. Use the sauce to dip your peeled Crawfish into if you desire. Craig [/SIZE] 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.