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Old 09-24-2008, 12:46 AM   #1
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First time cooking fish - need help

How do I cook Whiting in a skillet? It was frozen and should be thawed by the time I'm ready to cook it, do I need to do anything to it? How long do I cook it and how do I know when it's done?

I really want to keep this simple right now. The next time I cook some maybe I'll do something fancy with it. Are there any basic seasonings I should use? I'm cooking it for my father, I don't know what he likes, but I think a simple recipe would be fine. I just know he doesn't want it breaded and deep-fried. Personally, I don't like seafood unless it's been breaded and deep-fried. So I won't be sampling it before I serve it to him. I'll have to trust what you all tell me and hope it tastes good.

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Old 09-24-2008, 01:00 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mj1 View Post
How do I cook Whiting in a skillet? It was frozen and should be thawed by the time I'm ready to cook it, do I need to do anything to it? How long do I cook it and how do I know when it's done?

I really want to keep this simple right now. The next time I cook some maybe I'll do something fancy with it. Are there any basic seasonings I should use? I'm cooking it for my father, I don't know what he likes, but I think a simple recipe would be fine. I just know he doesn't want it breaded and deep-fried. Personally, I don't like seafood unless it's been breaded and deep-fried. So I won't be sampling it before I serve it to him. I'll have to trust what you all tell me and hope it tastes good.
Just order out... throw away and hide the take out containers. All in all, it will be easier... and both parties will end up more happy.
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Old 09-24-2008, 02:48 AM   #3
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Was this fish purchased in a commercially frozen package? If so, it is likely to be waterlogged, and I find that it needs time to "drain" on several thicknesses of paper towel before trying to cook it.

As for seasonings, I would suggest perhaps some lemon pepper seasoning? you can easily make some by zesting a lemon and mixing with ground black or preferably white pepper and kosher salt. A little finely chopped parsley adds color and zest, too.

I would broil it. The disposable foil broiler pans work well to keep the water the frozen fish usually throw off under the fish, so that it doesn't steam. You don't need to turn the fillet over. Just oil or Pam the broiler pan and put the fish as close to the heating element as possible for no more than 8 minutes, or the fillet will be overcooked.

Rule of thumb for cooking fish is 10 minutes for each inch of thickness.
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Old 09-24-2008, 12:53 PM   #4
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Wait a sec - the OP is talking about "Whiting", which nine times out of ten - whether fresh or frozen - is sold whole, not fileted. I think whole Whiting does much better pan-fried than broiled.

Are you talking about whole Whiting? If so, rinse, dry, & dredge in seasoned flour (flour with salt, pepper or lemon pepper, etc.) & pan-fry in about 1/2" or so (depending on the size of the fish) of vegetable oil for about 3-4 minutes per side (again - this depends on the size of the fish - test one by cutting into it for doneness). DON'T overcrowd the pan. You want at least an inch between the individual fish, which means you may have to cook them in batches. Keep the finished fish on a layer of paper towels on a tray or platter in a warm oven until all are cooked through.
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Old 09-24-2008, 01:08 PM   #5
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I have never seen whiting whole in New York. always filleted. and in many supermarkets around the country, I've seen it frozen in those rectangular boxes -- fillets frozen in a block.
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Old 09-24-2008, 01:29 PM   #6
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I've seen boxes of whole whiting, as well as the fillets here in "Missippi"...
Some stores slack them out, and sell them out of the seafood case...Cheap!
Oh, and in bags too....2 lbs maybe?....

Fried...butterflied whole or fillets can be pretty darn good if eaten while hot!! Cold?? Catfood IMO....I've tried them broiled/baked....not a favorite for me.

Locally they are also called Pan Trout by some....
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Old 09-24-2008, 03:36 PM   #7
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Toss 'em

We don't keep them here (when fishing) typically . My experience, year's ago it wash a really fishy fish, even cleaning it before you leave the water. Never seen them in the store.

Hope you have good luck cooking it .
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Old 09-24-2008, 04:38 PM   #8
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Hi MJ1,
As others have asked, are the fish whole, or fillet? If your Dad doesn't like fish breaded and deep fried, you may be better off cooking the fish in foil packets. Just take a sheet of aluminum foil large enough to wrap the fish securely, lay the fish in the center of the foil, salt and pepper the fish, maybe lay thin slices of lemon and or onion over the fish, add a bit of olive oil or butter and wrap securley. Toss packets on a hot grill or on a cookie sheet in a 400 degree oven. Rule of thumb for cooking time I believe is 10 mins per inch of thickness. Flip packets halfway through cooking time.
I guess some people may consider whiting to be fishy, but they go over well at our volunteer fire department charity event. Breaded and deep fried just like your Dad don't like!
Good luck! (and let us know how it turned out).
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Old 09-25-2008, 01:55 PM   #9
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Fishy? I'll bet it was old! To me, whiting is just another ubiquitous white-fleshed fish that doesn't taste like much until you add some seasonngs, and "stuff." It used to be really inexpensive, but nothing is that any more, except for mussels.
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Old 09-25-2008, 02:39 PM   #10
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Fishy? I'll bet it was old! To me, whiting is just another ubiquitous white-fleshed fish that doesn't taste like much until you add some seasonngs, and "stuff." It used to be really inexpensive, but nothing is that any more, except for mussels.
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