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Old 01-12-2014, 09:29 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
As jennyema said, fish can be quite good without dredging in flour at all. Try that.

I generally sautée fish without flour, but flounder tends to fall apart if I don't use it.
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Old 01-13-2014, 04:59 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by salt and pepper View Post
NO! They are two different things.
Can you explain what the difference is. When would you use each of them?
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Old 01-13-2014, 11:39 PM   #23
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I thought I explained earlier in the thread but can go into a little more detail.

Potato starch is fine like corn or tapioca starch. It has the same properties so will thicken liquids when cooked and can be combined with heavier rice flour to make a gluten-free all purpose flour mix (mine is rice flour, tapioca starch and potato starch in a 3/1/1 ratio).

Potato flour is more the consistency of ground potato flakes. It is a little heavier and can absorb liquid without being cooked (like flour, but can not be used as flour alone because it absorbs too much).

Here's a link that may help The Food Allergy Queen: Potato starch vs. potato flour
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Old 01-14-2014, 01:27 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LPBeier View Post
I thought I explained earlier in the thread but can go into a little more detail.

Potato starch is fine like corn or tapioca starch. It has the same properties so will thicken liquids when cooked and can be combined with heavier rice flour to make a gluten-free all purpose flour mix (mine is rice flour, tapioca starch and potato starch in a 3/1/1 ratio).

Potato flour is more the consistency of ground potato flakes. It is a little heavier and can absorb liquid without being cooked (like flour, but can not be used as flour alone because it absorbs too much).

Here's a link that may help The Food Allergy Queen: Potato starch vs. potato flour
Thank you LP. I've been having trouble making rødgrød (a Danish fruit pudding - Rødgrød - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). I thought the recipe called for potato flour, but I finally checked an online Danish food dictionary and "kartoffelmel" is potato starch, even though it sounds like it should be flour (kartoffel = potato, mel = flour). No wonder my fruit pudding wouldn't set.

So what can I do with potato flour? I don't need it for gluten free, we eat gluten.
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Old 01-14-2014, 07:28 PM   #25
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I tried using corn flour to dredge a piece of Dover sole. The flour didn't taste grainy like the white rice flour did, which is good. My challenge now is how to get the fish to crisp up a bit around the edges. I used my Calphalon anodized pan. Any ideas?
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