"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Fish & Seafood
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-20-2011, 03:53 AM   #21
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,009
This always cracks me up! How times change.

Along the northeastern coast of the U.S., the lobster was once so common in the 17th and 18th centuries that it was considered a "junk" food. When caught in great quantities or stranded on shore after severe storms, lobsters served as garden fertilizer and as a food staple given to widows, orphans, servants, and prisoners. It was so commonly used as a food for servants and prisoners that Massachusetts passed a law forbidding its use more than twice a week - - a daily lobster dinner was considered cruel and unusual punishment!
__________________

__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 04:55 AM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,342
I seem to recall Maine passed a similar law because lobster was served so frequently to prisoners.
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 07:38 AM   #23
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,796
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Read your Bible with explanations.
No thanks don't have one, not my cup of tea. So there isn't any real law.

Craig
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 08:02 AM   #24
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 511
unless I missed something, the google reference talks about eating live animals, not cooking live animals . . .
__________________
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 08:14 AM   #25
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,281
Chix lobsters are 4.99 a pound here. I might just have to boil up a few soon.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 09:17 AM   #26
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Bucky, unless I am mistaken, steam is hotter that boiling water so they should die at least as quickly I would think.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 09:23 AM   #27
Master Chef
 
FrankZ's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 9,633
Steam isn't hotter (pressure not withstanding) it just contains more thermal energy. The phase change requires extra energy.

Of course I might be misremembering my college chemistry.
__________________
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
FrankZ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 09:29 AM   #28
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
From my undsertanding (which absolutely could be wrong) water will turn into steam at 212. Water will never get above 212 (not taking pressure into account), but steam can continue to get hotter.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 09:50 AM   #29
Master Chef
 
FrankZ's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 9,633
At 1 atmosphere of pressure water will phase change at its boiling point. It requires extra energy to do so. Under pressure it will achieve (much) higher temperatures.

I know some don't like Wikipedia.. but this is pretty much how I remember it.

I suspect this is why steam cooks faster without having to be hotter. In a pressure cooker it is hotter, but not nearly as hot as I expected. On the 15 PSI setting it is only 252F or 122C.
__________________
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
FrankZ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 10:12 AM   #30
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 511
any Navy boiler technician can explain it - no Wikipedia required.

at the same pressure, water and steam exist at the same temperature.
if one continues to heat the steam, it's called superheated steam - ie heated above it's "normal" temperature at that pressure.

btw, the "clouds" one often associated with "steam" aren't really "steam" - it's steam that has condensed back into very fine water droplets/mist. the so called "live steam" is not "visible"
__________________

__________________
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.