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Old 01-05-2015, 04:32 PM   #31
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No, how does that work, Craig?
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Old 01-05-2015, 04:55 PM   #32
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No, how does that work, Craig?
I was asking because I've heard of it, but never tried it.
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Old 01-07-2015, 12:54 PM   #33
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Has anyone ever heard of putting them in the freezer for 10-15 minutes to make shucking easier?
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I was asking because I've heard of it, but never tried it.
I have heard of this method but never tried it.
It supposedly allows the oyster to slightly open thus making shucking very easy.
This is my problem. Getting the hinge to loosen. If the oyster was slightly open before trying to pry it open, I could do a dozen in no time flat.
I have little patience and most of the time, my wife will shuck a dozen for me. I do not time her as i would be wondering if they were still fresh by the time she finished.
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Old 02-18-2015, 11:19 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
I bought 2 dz. Oysters in the shell since I couldn't get the pre-shucked.

I washed them and laid them out on a rack in a large roasting pan with about a half inch of water below.

My plan is to put them under the broiler just until they pop open, then remove them from the shell to make an oyster stew.

Next, I'll strain the water through a paper towel lined sieve, and add that to the stew.

I've never had to deal with in the shell oysters, so I'd appreciate and suggestions. I'm just guessing at this point.
Your approach is a good one. I wouldn't have them too close to the broiler element. Maybe one rack down. Too much heat will cause the shell to open but the oyster may reach too high heat and become tough.
When I made a shellfish stew/soup I add the raw shellfish to the boiling stew base just a minute or so before serving. I use some form of fish stock in the base. Bottled clam juice is tasty but a little goes a long way. The remainder keeps in the fridge well.
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Old 02-19-2015, 08:18 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Actually, it's not that difficult. As long as you use a towel to protect your hand, you're not going to do much damage to it with the knife (or the oyster shell, which can also be quite sharp).

As far as having an oyster knife, yes, they are a nice-to-have item. But before shelling out money for one, I opened plenty of oysters using nothing more than a big fat screwdriver.

Once you get the hang of it, it's really not that complicated at all.
Steve has the right idea. You don't have to have an oyster knife. I had one, but my first husband looked around the house and found plenty of tools that can be used to open oysters. A large screwdriver was one of them. It just has to have a flat edge on the end that you can wiggle into the shell. He even used the claw of a hammer. Got the oyster open!
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Old 02-19-2015, 08:26 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I have heard of this method but never tried it.
It supposedly allows the oyster to slightly open thus making shucking very easy.
This is my problem. Getting the hinge to loosen. If the oyster was slightly open before trying to pry it open, I could do a dozen in no time flat.
I have little patience and most of the time, my wife will shuck a dozen for me. I do not time her as i would be wondering if they were still fresh by the time she finished.
This method works for lobsters. For oysters, I have no idea. Once you loosen that hinge, the rest is so easy. Sea food tend to rest when in the freezer and are easier to handle. But you don't want to leave them in there too long. There is a fine line between getting them to relax and freezing them to death.

I hate handling live lobsters. They flail all around before they going into the pot. So I toss them in the fridge so they will go to sleep. Then into the boiling water they go!.
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Old 02-19-2015, 08:32 AM   #37
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I sometimes buy quahogs. These are very large clams with hard shells closed tight. I make stuff quahogs with them. I place them in a large pot with a small amount of water. Just enough to create heat and some boil. It forces the quahogs to open just enough that I can remove the meat. When I start removing them, I pour all their liquor back into the pot, strain it and use it in the stuffing for moisture. I don't want to lose the flavor of the meat. Stuffed quahogs are great appetizers. Big enough, just a couple make a whole meal.
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Old 02-19-2015, 08:36 AM   #38
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You could steam them on top of the stove like clams.

Scrub the oysters, get a pot with an inch or so of seasoned water in the bottom, bring the liquid to a boil, pop in the oysters, cover the pan, turn down the heat to medium and steam them for 5 minutes or so until the shells open. Strain the liquid to remove any sand or grit and add some or all of it to your stew.
Perfect instructions. Make sure you capture all that liquor of the animal inside. I dump it back into the pot and strain it all at the same time. Most shelled animals have sand inside the shell. And having a glass cover on the pot you can watch as they open. When you see most of them open, shut off the heat and let stand for a very short time. It will allow all those that are alive to open completely so you can remove the meat.
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