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Old 10-08-2010, 02:16 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Just snorted my ice tea Andy.

As for "fishy tasting" fresh fish, I think salmon is at the top of my list. I just don't get the popularity of salmon.
I will agree with you mostly with cooked salmon.

Now raw salmon is a fish of another color. Raw it is one of the best tasting things ever and does not taste fishy at all.
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Old 10-08-2010, 02:20 PM   #32
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Salmon has several things going for it:

*It has a high fillet to waste ratio. A 10 pound salmon may yield 7 lbs. of fillets.
* Salmon has a unique, yet un-fishy flavor (a matter of taste). The skin crisps into nice texture, and the meat flakes, letting you see that it's cooked properly as it's served. Smoked salmon acquires an almost sweetness to it, and in the Pacific Northwest it's sometimes referred to as "Squaw Candy."
*Salmon is abundant and is a self-renewing food source.
*It's readily available fresh, frozen, dehydrated, smoked, salt packed or canned.
*There are probably more different recipes for preparing salmon than any other ocean fish.

I prefer mine smoked, then dehydrated with a soy-honey glaze!!!
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Old 10-08-2010, 02:33 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
How hard would it have been to come up with a name for a fish other than crappie?

...but it's pronounced CROPpie, Andy!
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Old 10-08-2010, 02:35 PM   #34
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Salmon is one of my favorite foods, but I concede it is definitely in the "fishy fish" category. I would never cook it for someone who is not (pardon the pun ) an aficionado.
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Old 10-08-2010, 02:42 PM   #35
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Andy, have you ever had ceviche made with swordfish? TO DIE FOR!!!
Here in Chile swordfish and sea bass (corvina) is common in ceviche. Reneita a cheap and very tasty fish is also used.

Salmon carpaccio is also common. For that they make salmon ceviche then lay it out tile like, add cheese and capers top with lemon, really good stuff. But all of the ceviche is in the citrus for only a few minutes before serving and I have not seen any chiles in the ceviche.
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Old 10-08-2010, 02:44 PM   #36
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I will agree with you mostly with cooked salmon.

Now raw salmon is a fish of another color. Raw it is one of the best tasting things ever and does not taste fishy at all.
I'd agree with that GB....I love salmon sushi and I also like smoked salmon, but cooked salmon just doesn't do it for me....sumpin evil happens to it.
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Old 10-08-2010, 03:16 PM   #37
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Hey everyone, i'm new here, but i've got a real quick question. I personally love pretty much any kind of fish, but my fiance pretty much hates any kind of fish (with the exception of tuna, which IMO does not count).

My question is, what kind of fish does not have that really strong "fishy" flavor? And what would be a good way to make it so that someone who doesnt really care for fish might like it?

Thanks everyone!
I just posted this recipe for you mike. I bet your honey would like it.
Hope this helps.

Fabulous Fish Italiano
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Old 10-08-2010, 08:58 PM   #38
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BT, no one raises hogs that way anymore. Modern high volume hog farming techniques are very different. Check this out:

HowStuffWorks "Hog Raising"
thanks andy. interesting info.

chefjune, relax your pits. i wasn't attempting an agenda of "misinformation". coprophagia is common amongst many animals, especially pigs.

the reason why farmers try to avoid letting their pigs eat their own or other animals excrement is a higher risk of parasite infection.

unless you helped your uncles with piggy pooper scoopers, they probably ate some poop.
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Old 10-09-2010, 06:38 AM   #39
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As someone who absolutely hated fish until I was pushing 30 and hubby got assigned to Hawaii:

I don't care what anyone says, to me any of the higher fat fish (salmon for example) taste too fishy. And, as a kid, I hated the canned tuna we ate on Fridays during lent.

Hawaii undid my pre-conceived notions about the flavor of fish. I love raw beef, and so I took to ahi sashimi like a fish to water. Now, living in the midwest, I will buy tuna that has been flown in. I also like swordfish. For local fish, I like trout and perch. They are all mild. I'll eat canned tuna if it is all white in water. That gray stuff in oil that was all we could get when I was young is out of there. Actually, the gray to black lines that go through many fish is way too strong for me.

I've come a long way from the fish hating kid I was (and in my twenties, anything really good was out of my price range), but I still am somewhat fussy about eating fish. It has to be really mild.
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Old 10-09-2010, 12:52 PM   #40
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Problems arise in cooked fish such as salmon and tuna when it's improperly prepared. That grey-oily tuna meat is the blood line. It should have been removed before the tuna was cooked. The same is true of the flesh under the dorsal fin and along the belly. That is where the nasty flavors come from. The flavor of fish fat is about the same as cod liver oil. Prepared properly, both salmon and tuna are excellent fish. Yes, they do have a pronounced flavor, just as beef has its own flavor. But it's not that fishy flavor that is much like the smell of a fish shop. As for swordfish and brook trout, they taste very similar to me. Brook trout that's been brought to life in hatcheries is very mild in flavor. I prefer wild trout, with that beautiful light orange flesh. But that's my choice.

Not everyone is going to like strong flavored fish, or even medium strong flavored fish. My eldest daughter doesn't like cooked salmon or trout, but loves swordfish. I'm not crazy about some of the extremely mild fish. To me they are boring and tasteless.

I think it has something to do with the sensitivity of our taste buds as well. As a kid, I hated rye bread with caraway seeds, and horseradish. As I grew older, as with everyone, my tastebuds lost some of their sensitivity. One day, I found that I loved rye bread with caraway seeds, and horseradish. The flavors of the ingredients hadn't changed. But my sensitivity to them did. Salt became less salty. Horseradish had less bite. Unfortunately, though I still love them, blueberries don't taste as amazing as they did when I was a kid. It's simply the nature of things.

My point is, you may not like the flavor of a kind of fish today. But in another ten years, it may taste wonderful to you. And a tip for the op. Your partner may not like the flavor of some kinds of fish. But that doesn't mean that if you do like them, you can't have them. Try making the fish in foil packets, with a bit of butter, some sliced potatoes and carrots. Both of you will have what you want, individualized to your taste preferences. She doesn't even have to have fish in her foil pouch. She can have chicken, or beef, or whatever. you will both enjoy a good meal together, and that's what eating together is all about, enjoying it together.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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