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Old 11-22-2004, 08:48 AM   #1
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Kedgeree

Legend has it that this dish was invented by a Scottish regiment, stationed in India during the days of the British Raj, but that may be just an auld wifies' tale...

It used to be served as a weekend breakfast dish (too much trouble for weekdays, I suppose) and is still served in posh, country house hotels all over the UK.

KEDGEREE
These quantities makes enough for four

2 large finnan haddies
300mls of milk to poach the fish
350g Basmati rice
2 oz butter
3 or 4 hard boiled eggs, shelled and chopped
750ml chicken stock
1 medium onion, finely chopped
One bay leaf
Half teaspoon grated nutmeg
Ground pepper (to taste)
1-2 teaspoons curry powder (I like it to be quite strong and add 2)


Pre-heat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas Mark 4.

Cook the onion gently in the butter and add the rice, stirring to coat the rice in butter. Add the stock and bring to the boil. Add the bay leaf, cover and cook in the oven for about 20 minutes or until the rice has absorbed the stock.
(Remember to remove the bay leaf at the end of cooking)

Warm the milk, and then add to a saucepan with the fish. Poach the fish in hot milk for five minutes and drain just before the rice is ready. Flake the fish.
When the rice is ready, stir in the flaked fish, chopped eggs, curry powder, nutmeg and pepper, using a fork to stir the flaked fish (to prevent the rice from breaking up).

Traditionally, if eaten at breakfast time, kedgeree is served with softly scrambled eggs. I think it is filling enough without any extras!

Finnan Haddie is smoked haddock, named after the fishing village of Findon, up near Aberdeen on the North East coast. It's the best smoked haddock in the world.
Another unique Scottish way of smoking fish is shown in the production of Arbroath Smokies - delicious

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Old 11-22-2004, 10:35 PM   #2
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This recipe sounds interesting, and I love the history you included along with it!

:) Barbara
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Old 11-24-2004, 10:27 AM   #3
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Can't help myself, Barbara - it's often the history of the dish that makes it fascinating to learn from new culinary backgrounds. 8)
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Old 11-24-2004, 04:02 PM   #4
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I'm glad you can't help yourself Ishbel! I absolutely love history. Most of my college classes were history classes, and I have been reading history since I was old enough to pick up a book! Hey, I should contact the local college and see if I can get a job teaching The History of Food!

:) Barbara
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Old 01-09-2005, 07:27 PM   #5
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This looks wonderful, Ishbel! I'd love to make it, but unfortunately finnan haddie is not available here in the middle of Nowhere That Thinks It's THE Where. Is there any sort of feasible substitute? There are 1.5 oz tins of smoked haddock @$1.15 on the supermarket fish shelves, but I don't know if or how well they would work, or how many tins would be required if they would be ok to use. Please advise? Thanks :D !
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Old 01-10-2005, 04:08 AM   #6
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Goodness, Leigh - I've never even HEARD of tinned smoked haddock! I use about 1 lb in weight of haddock fillets.

Are you able to get smoked haddock or even, at a push, smoked cod, where you live? I don't think things like tinned tuna or salmon would do.... Perhaps fresh salmon fillets could be used, but you wouldn't have the essential smokey flavour of the fish.

PS It has to be a fish which can be chunked or flaked.
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Old 01-10-2005, 12:50 PM   #7
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I have seen recipes for kedgeree made with fresh salmon, or even fresh with a few pieces of smoked salmon thrown in. In Australia we always used smoked cod, not fantastic, but it did the job, we don't get lovely smoked fish in Oz like we do in UK.
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