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Old 01-18-2007, 09:38 AM   #11
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Oh they are not too big 12 ounces or so. Some even smaller. It got pretty dark at night and these people were selling it at the seaside so I realised later that I should have taken bigger ones. They selling it in lots so I just bought a batch.

I read somewhere that the claws tastes the best( actually a debate between the claw meatand the tail meat) but these lobsters dont have claws!

I'll post a pic in a bit
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Old 01-18-2007, 09:41 AM   #12
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Oh man my memory card got stuck in my laptop
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Old 01-18-2007, 09:49 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
There is actually a lot of meat in the body if you know where to look and have the inclination to go digging. Most people do not, but I love it so I do dig for it. Where each of the little swimmer legs attach to the body is a knuckle and there is a decent amount of meat in each of those knuckles. You really need to get in there though. It is not a clean or easy process.

After doing what I did even while cooking I don't have the heart to eat it My mom on the other hand loved iy and finished all of it. Now I'm thinking I'll only but the cleaned, shelled lobster meat

But tell me, what part of the upper body is edible? It is quite hollow after removing the tail. Is it still worth digging in?
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Old 01-18-2007, 09:54 AM   #14
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OMG Now I realise this! They did have claws but those people removed themprobably because they are cannibalistic!
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Old 01-18-2007, 10:24 AM   #15
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Shaheen, my apologies. I did not check to see where you lived. The lobsters I was talking about would be Maine lobsters which are different from the type you would get. I do not really know much about your kind, except to say that 10 minutes in boiling water does now sounds more reasonable.
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Old 01-18-2007, 03:23 PM   #16
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Shaheen, cook them to done--but not overdone. There won't be much meat to those little fellas. Just enjoy.

GB, I had never heard of freezing raw lobster either but that is now what Whole Foods is selling. I really didn't think it was even safe, but it is, according to a site I found in looking for that answer. Apparently pretty common.
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Old 01-18-2007, 03:41 PM   #17
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Putting a whole live lobster in the fridge to die slowly and then preserve by freezing is not a good idea because of the toxicity concerns GB mentioned above. Freezing slows the toxins growth but doen't kill them. WF contracts only with vendors that process the lobsters in very stringent conditions. I assume they kill them and remove the head and body and then flash freeze them so that development of toxins is limited. Then they are sold right away (I assume).

If you do this, make sure you don't leave them frozen for very long. Cook them.

IMO the claws were removed to save the claw meat for someone else.
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Old 01-18-2007, 05:18 PM   #18
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While I would not have frozen them, you should probably cook them ASAP (I no longer buy lobster at Whole Foods becuse of the fact that you can't buy fresh).

Blanch them in a pot of boiling water for about a minute, then remove them. This cooks the connective tissues just enough so that the tailmeat will release from the shell, but effectively leaving them raw. De-vein the tail, and you have nice big hunks of raw lobster meat!

I see you live in India. You might want to try poaching some tail pieces in Ghee. Make sure the butter is no more than 70C and cook until the tailmeat is about 62C. Serve these pieces of "poached" lobster over some rice cooked in stock and some mild spices of your choice. Cooked past 145F/62C the meat begins to toughen. Lobster meat is kinda sinewy anyways, even when raw... me having been spoiled on delicate giant sea scallops here in the NorthEast US. The claw meat of Maine lobsters is different though, and I love it's texture.

I actually prefer lobster tail/leg meat diced up in something like Lobster Salad, or diced up and added to a pilaf/risotto (or maybe in a seafood stuffing for a big piece of cod or haddock).

Good luck!
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Old 01-18-2007, 08:00 PM   #19
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Shaheen, OK you panicked.

I do it regularly. Wish I could set my flight or fight indicator to less of the panic mode and just take a breath and go with it.

No such luck.

Would personally, at this point, use this episode as a learning experience.

Would take one out, thaw it, remove the tail, and toss it in some boiling water. And taste it.

Would take another and throw it in a pot of boiling water frozen and let it cook and do the same.

Or take one and steam it.

Or try one braised in butter.

Just play with it.

I can tell you how I like to cook Homarus americanus, the New England lobster, but have no idea how to cook what species you are referring to.

There are so many 'lobsters' in the sea.

Would ask locals their ideas and experiment with the stuff you have.

Just my approach. Take care and hope you enjoy the bugs.
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Old 01-19-2007, 09:15 AM   #20
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Thanks a lot everyone! I learnt a lot
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