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Old 03-17-2008, 01:57 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
I heard the texture of Monk was comparable to a lobster tail?
i believe it is called "poor man's lobster" used to cook it a lot, don't see in super market anymore.


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Old 03-17-2008, 01:57 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
I heard the texture of Monk was comparable to a lobster tail?
texture, but not flavor. Monkfish is very meaty. When I was doing a "fish stage" with a chef-instructor at Le Cordon Bleu, Paris a couple of years ago, my chef recommended cooking a whole monkfish as you would a leg of lamb... with garlic, rosemary, etc. I tried it when I came home, and all I can say is WOW! served it with red wine, and everything!

My choices for a "fish newbie" would be sole, flounder or brook trout. sauteed simply in equal parts unsalted butter/extra virgin olive oil, seasoned only with salt, pepper and finished with a squirt of fresh lemon juice and sprinkle of chopped parsley.

No tilapia at our house, either. Want to stay as far away from any food coming from China as possible.
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Old 03-17-2008, 02:24 PM   #23
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Monkfish is delicious, & still readily available around here. The problem is that it's never sold prepped, which makes it a pain in the you-know-what. Monkfish tail (the only part of the fish that's eaten), while sold skinned, nine times out of ten is still sold covered with the pale grey membrane that remains attached to the flesh after the skin is removed. While not inedible, this membrane is not only tough, but will cause the fish to curl up tightly when cooked. And boy, is it a pain in the you-know-what to remove before cooking. Regardless of how sharp my knife is, I always end up taking off fish flesh along with that membrane, plus it's just plain time-consuming to get it all off.

I still do cook Monkfish tail occasionally - when the pieces look especially nice & I'm feeling ambitious & with some spare time - lol!!
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Old 03-17-2008, 06:10 PM   #24
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I find that the fattier the fish is, the genteler you have to cook it. The high heat changes the molecular structure of the surface fat and makes it taste fishier. Salmon, for instance. Baked at low heat til still not quite set in the center, or poached, makes a less fishy taste. Liquid helps cushion it too. Wine, broth or even water for a gentle steam effect. Sear it and it can be too much for the fat in the meat. Leaner fish take to sauteeing alot better. Just butter or mild olive oil and S$P bring out the fresh taste best.
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Old 03-18-2008, 02:57 PM   #25
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If you can find it, Mahi Mahi and Sable/Black Cod/Butterfish can be fairly easy to cook (with a good recipe) and absolutely delicious.

I get some tilapia now and again and it's tasty for some preparations, I certainly don't exclude it, but I get a bunch of other things as well.

I've never prepared monkfish in any guise, however. I'd love to take a shot at it.


Skate is one of my favorite fish, especially with a mustard butter sauce.
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Old 03-18-2008, 04:22 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Victoria1 View Post
I find that the fattier the fish is, the genteler you have to cook it. The high heat changes the molecular structure of the surface fat and makes it taste fishier. Salmon, for instance. Baked at low heat til still not quite set in the center, or poached, makes a less fishy taste. Liquid helps cushion it too. Wine, broth or even water for a gentle steam effect. Sear it and it can be too much for the fat in the meat. Leaner fish take to sauteeing alot better. Just butter or mild olive oil and S$P bring out the fresh taste best.
I have no problems sauteing salmon. Try this recipe sometime. (copied from my web site (I hold the copyright).

Falafel-Crusted Salmon on a bed of Spinach

This is a "restaurant-style" dish that is easy to make at home. It's a very popular choice for my Cooking Class Parties, because almost everyone likes salmon. Everyone also wants to be able to present an impressive and delicious meal to family and friends with as little effort as possible.

makes 6 servings

2 salmon fillets, about 1 pound each, skin removed
Dijon mustard
1 cup "Fantastic Falafel" mix
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground cumin
Extra virgin olive oil (to film the pan)
2 additional tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 medium sized onion, chopped
2 bags (10 ounces each) fresh spinach, stemmed, well washed and dried
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  1. Cut each salmon fillet into 3 equal servings. Put a thin coat of mustard on top of each piece.
  2. In a small flat bowl or plate, blend falafel mix with pepper and cumin. Place both the fish and falafel plates near your cooking surface.
  3. Film a large non-stick skillet with the olive oil over medium-high heat. Dip the mustard side of each piece of salmon in the falafel mixture. Shake off excess and place in the hot oil, crumb-side down. Cook until almost done (and well browned) before turning the pieces over (about 4 minutes). Cook about 4 more minutes. Remove to a warm platter and keep warm.
  4. Add about 2 tablespoons olive oil to the skillet and saute the onion until soft (about 4 minutes). Add the garlic and ginger and saute briefly. Add the well-dried spinach to the pan and cook until wilted. When the spinach is almost dry, add the balsamic vinegar and toss gently to coat the spinach.
  5. Divide the spinach among 6 individual plates and arrange the salmon on top. Serve at once.
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Old 03-18-2008, 09:58 PM   #27
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Well, I hit the local fish market today. I picked up two tuna steaks and a filet of cod that had just come in filetted and frozen on the boat. Since the cod was still frozen, I put it in the freezer for another day and cooked the tuna. It was sushi grade tuna that I marinated for about hour in a garlic and herb marinade by KC Masterpiece then broiled for 4 mins a side. I made rice and also peas for a nice dinner. The tuna was very good. DH liked it and even finished off what I couldn't finish. The market also had red snapper, orange roughy, striped bass, mahi mahi and one other I can't remember now. I will go back again and try them all at some point. Thanks for all your help!
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Old 03-18-2008, 10:11 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by jabbur View Post
Well, I hit the local fish market today. I picked up two tuna steaks and a filet of cod that had just come in filetted and frozen on the boat. Since the cod was still frozen, I put it in the freezer for another day and cooked the tuna. It was sushi grade tuna that I marinated for about hour in a garlic and herb marinade by KC Masterpiece then broiled for 4 mins a side. I made rice and also peas for a nice dinner. The tuna was very good. DH liked it and even finished off what I couldn't finish. The market also had red snapper, orange roughy, striped bass, mahi mahi and one other I can't remember now. I will go back again and try them all at some point. Thanks for all your help!
That's great, jabbur! I'm so glad you and DH enjoyed your tuna dinner - sounds great.
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Old 03-18-2008, 10:12 PM   #29
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I'm jealous. I ate a lot of fresh seafood last time I was in VA and would love to have access again..... to the seafood. I'm still allowed in VA as far as I know.
Glad it came out well!
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Old 03-19-2008, 06:16 PM   #30
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jabbur .. try the rockfish .. striped bass .. it should be pretty local
and fresh .. also .. flounder is great in your(our) neck of the woods ..
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