"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Fish & Seafood
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-06-2006, 03:21 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 246
Here on the Puget Sound they seem to be still plentiful and quite tasty.

They don't grow much north of Seattle- maybe 200 miles, as the water temperature needs to get around 70 degrees F for them to breed and even in the surface waters that takes a while. [ Bye the way that is the reason for the old ditty about not eating an oyster in a month that doesn't have an R in it, they use all their stored fat to reproduce and they don't taste good, other than that no reason not to eat them.]

I'd love to add some advice about eating them cooked but the best months to eat them are the winter and I just go find a rock at low tide and sit down and "pig out". Oh yeah, try a squeeze of Myers Lemon on a fresh one. WOW
__________________

__________________
May you eat well,
Robert
Robt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 03:59 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
There's nothing (well, almost nothing) better than a freshly shucked Kumamoto Oyster. I once ate 58 of them at on oyster bar in downtown Portland.
__________________

__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 03:08 PM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
Galleywench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Moss Landing, Ca
Posts: 13
My Husband found this recipe and it is great!
1 can smoked oysters smashed
1 pk cream cheese
Roll out cream cheese between plastic wrap and make a rectangle as best as possible. Take off top layer and spread smashed oysters. Roll up like a jelly roll and serve with your favorite crackers mmmmmmm. Nothing easier :)
__________________
Susan ..... I just love to feed people.... One of lifes true joys!!!
Galleywench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 03:15 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Galleywench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Moss Landing, Ca
Posts: 13
Oh yeah... I forgot! Add chopped green onions to the top of the roll for a garnish. And don't forget to take to plastic off as you roll it up, it will also stay fresh in the fridge for a couple of days.
__________________
Susan ..... I just love to feed people.... One of lifes true joys!!!
Galleywench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 07:11 PM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Oysters Johnny Reb

2 quarts oysters
1/2 cup fine chop parsley
1/2 cup fine chop green onion
2 Tbls fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup butter, melted
2 cup fine cracker crumbs
1 Tbl. Wrochestershire
Paprika
12 Tbls of Half & Half
Salt, Pepper, Tabasco to taste.

In a shallow 2 qt dish place a layer of oysters.
Sprinke 1/2 half of everything except crackers, paprika and half & half
Make another layer of the same. Add the half & half between the oysters on top layer...cover with caracker crumbs and paprika.
Bake at 325 until set...

Said to have originated at the Old Southern Tea Room..in Vicksburg Mississippi.
__________________
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 07:48 PM   #16
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 294
this is prime oyster season. Anyone ever been to the oyster bar in NY's grand central station? They have an incredible selection! IC, I agree on the Kumamoto oysters, they are killer!
__________________
Chef_Jimmy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 08:24 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
My mom makes a delicious Chinese dish of oyster pancake using oysters, eggs, beansprouts, tapioca starch, chives. Served with a sweet, sour, spicy sauce. It's comfort food for me. It's served in many Chinese restaurants but quality varies depending on the cook.
__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2006, 01:54 AM   #18
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
My only experiences with oysters is the Gulf Coast - New Orleans and Texas. Can't remember any experience where I didn't love them! Raw, fried, chowder/stew ... you name it and I love them!

Just don't screw them up by squirting lemon juice all over them!!!
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2006, 01:59 AM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Bordeaux
Posts: 179
Oysters are infinitely better raw, and it is such a pity to cook them!

I like green Marennes oysters from the Charente Maritime, but Breton oysters are superb.

Like foie gras, this is a perfect example of simple yet supremely elegant food: all you need is fresh, top-grade oysters and dry white wine. A ticket to 7th heaven.

Where I live, oysters are often served with vinegar and chopped shallots accompanied by a small sausage or "crépinette", a square sausage (with or without truffle" incased in caul.

Best regards,
Alex R.
__________________
AlexR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2006, 06:57 AM   #20
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
Unfortunately the last time I had oysters at GCS I got a touch of intestinal flu!!
We adore them raw. Get a "roast" in the fall where they are steamed until just BARELY open, hence wet and juicy.
The Johnny Reb recipe is almost our traditional Thanksgiving and Christmas side dish of scalloped oysters--from the Charleston Receipts cookbook--and prepared by DH's grandmother for years before that cookbook was written.
__________________

__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.