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Old 11-06-2007, 08:32 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
Ok. You lucky guys and gals that live in coastal areas know some thngs I don't know, from lack of exposure. Just what is the difference between a bisque and a chowder? I've had both and they seemed very similar to me. Is it just that a chowder is chunkier? Or maybe, the meals I had were misnamed and there is a real difference in the two. Please share the info.
Painting with a very broad brush GW. Chowder usually includes potatoes.
Bisque does not. Both seem to be Cream/milk based. Then again there are bisque versions in the South that do not include milk or cream, and there are probably other regional versions and definitions. It is an interesting question. Maybe start a new thread, and pose the question to see what others have to say!
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Old 11-06-2007, 08:53 PM   #22
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Goodweed - basically ... a bisque is a pureed seafood soup, a chowder has chunks and lumps. Take exactly the same recipe ... if you puree it - it's a bisque, leave it chunky and it's a chowder.
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Old 11-06-2007, 10:00 PM   #23
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Ok.Heres a question can you roast the shells in the oven a bit somewhat like beef bones to pull out more flavor before making stock?. As I always find I dont have enough shells to make a decent stock.
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Old 11-07-2007, 05:06 AM   #24
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hmmm--good question jpmcgrew! Never tried it but I wonder if it might not have a funny smell. If you do experiment or someone has already tried it let us know. I rarely have enough shells, too, and it takes me months to save them up. So if that works I'm ready to try it.
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Old 11-07-2007, 07:23 AM   #25
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Yabbie

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK View Post
Bilby, could you enlighten us Yanks on what "yabbie bisque" is?
Yabbie Picture

It has a sweeter taste than crayfish (which is the Australian Rock Lobster), and is substantially smaller. Crayfish can (depending on the cook) come out a bit dry or tasteless. Less likely to happen with yabbies, although not impossible, as they are cooked quicker, more like a prawn in that respect. Usually they are served whole and unshelled, either in a sauce with rice or part of a salad. In pasta they are more normally completely shelled. Possibly because they are farmed, they are processed quicker and seem to not gain that water logged taste that crayfish also suffer from. A main course featuring unshelled yabbies would probably include no less than a dozen. Because of their small stature, you seldom bother taking out the meat from the claws, like you would from a lobster or crab.

The sweetness of the yabbie gives a bisque a lovely delicate flavour. I have ever only had it in better class restaurants - well for Perth, which specialises in laid-back!

Oh and if you go to File 4 of the above link, you will see a picture of a bilby and her young.
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Old 11-08-2007, 04:36 AM   #26
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Prawn shuckings

Extract from today's DAILY EXPRESS:-

WE'RE ALL SHELL-SHOCKED.
Lobsters and even prawns feel pain, the scientists are telling us.
So does this mean that anyone who eats them is guilty of shellfishness?
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Old 11-08-2007, 07:03 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Alans View Post
Extract from today's DAILY EXPRESS:-

WE'RE ALL SHELL-SHOCKED.
Lobsters and even prawns feel pain, the scientists are telling us.
So does this mean that anyone who eats them is guilty of shellfishness?
Haha!! Very droll!
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Old 11-08-2007, 11:17 AM   #28
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Thank you Bilby! I always like learn what folks in other parts of the world call their food. Especially when I work with recipes from that part of the world.

jcmpgrew, I am leary about roasting the shells, as the high points and edges would probably burn. However, I love to saute the shells of shrimp before I add the water to make the stock. This also keeps the shells from floating up out of the liquid while it simmers.
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Old 11-08-2007, 11:22 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK View Post
I love to saute the shells of shrimp before I add the water to make the stock. This also keeps the shells from floating up out of the liquid while it simmers.
This has me very curious. What about sauteing them keeps them from floating?
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Old 11-08-2007, 06:45 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by AllenOK View Post
Thank you Bilby! I always like learn what folks in other parts of the world call their food. Especially when I work with recipes from that part of the world.

jcmpgrew, I am leary about roasting the shells, as the high points and edges would probably burn. However, I love to saute the shells of shrimp before I add the water to make the stock. This also keeps the shells from floating up out of the liquid while it simmers.
Probably really stink up the house as well.
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