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Old 11-08-2007, 08:23 PM   #31
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Probably really stink up the house as well.
In my experience, frying prawn brains is not an overly pleasant smell that tends to linger.
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Old 11-08-2007, 08:28 PM   #32
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In my experience, frying prawn brains is not an overly pleasant smell that tends to linger.
How do you get the brains out of a prawn?Do they actually have a brain.You cant be serious or are you?
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Old 11-08-2007, 08:34 PM   #33
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The heads and all they contain, so call that what you will. Mustard? Brains works for me! As to whether a prawn technically has a brain or just a pot of nerve endings, can't say I have ever considered the issue!

Or do you discard the heads when you are doing your stock? All the recipes I have seen use the heads as well as the shells.
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Old 11-08-2007, 08:48 PM   #34
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The heads and all they contain, so call that what you will. Mustard? Brains works for me! As to whether a prawn technically has a brain or just a pot of nerve endings, can't say I have ever considered the issue!

Or do you discard the heads when you are doing your stock? All the recipes I have seen use the heads as well as the shells.
Yes I would use the heads for sure.I wasn't trying to jerk your chain I was just having a bit of fun with you.To take the joke further you must need teeny tiny tweezers to get the brains outLiving on different continents our language isn't alway the same. No cut down intended.
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Old 11-08-2007, 08:52 PM   #35
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Yes I would use the heads for sure.I wasn't trying to jerk your chain I was just having a bit of fun with you.To take the joke further you must need teeny tiny tweezers to get the brains outLiving on different continents our language isn't alway the same. No cut down intended.
Didn't take it any other way! Just wasn't too sure whether I did things differently to the rest of the participants of the thread. I certainly find a lot of threads on this site mean different things to me while several I have no idea what anyone is even talking about!
Tiny tweezers indeed!!!!
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Old 11-08-2007, 09:16 PM   #36
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Hey Bilby,I adore a good Aussie movie one of my favorites is Welcome to Woop Woop.Theres another called Stricktly(sp) Ball Room and of course Prissilla(sp?) Queen of the Dessert.Any more recommendations.Woop Woop was almost impossible to get here got it on VCR but cant find it on DVD
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Old 11-08-2007, 09:28 PM   #37
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Hey Bilby,I adore a good Aussie movie one of my favorites is Welcome to Woop Woop.Theres another called Stricktly(sp) Ball Room and of course Prissilla(sp?) Queen of the Dessert.Any more recommendations.Woop Woop was almost impossible to get here got it on VCR but cant find it on DVD
I have heard of Woop Woop but not seen it. Strictly Ballroom was good but Baz Luhrmann has gone a long way since! Personally couldn't stand Priscilla.
Malcolm (with Colin Friels as Malcolm) was a movie in the 80's which was very funny at the time but not sure if it has stood up to the times. Last Train to Fremantle is meant to be very good but I haven't seen it. As well there is the Crocodile Dundee movies (but only the first one was any good), The Castle, The Dish, Muriel's Wedding, Wolf Creek, Crackerjack, The Extra. Rogue is just out at the moment with Michael Vartan from Alias.

Most of the movies we get here are American. We don't have a huge film industry, for that matter we don't do a lot of (acting) tv either! In truth, I'm probably not the best person to ask as I only go to the movies once or twice a year. Rom might be of more use.
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Old 11-08-2007, 09:45 PM   #38
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I have heard of Woop Woop but not seen it. Strictly Ballroom was good but Baz Luhrmann has gone a long way since! Personally couldn't stand Priscilla.
Malcolm (with Colin Friels as Malcolm) was a movie in the 80's which was very funny at the time but not sure if it has stood up to the times. Last Train to Fremantle is meant to be very good but I haven't seen it. As well there is the Crocodile Dundee movies (but only the first one was any good), The Castle, The Dish, Muriel's Wedding, Wolf Creek, Crackerjack, The Extra. Rogue is just out at the moment with Michael Vartan from Alias.

Most of the movies we get here are American. We don't have a huge film industry, for that matter we don't do a lot of (acting) tv either! In truth, I'm probably not the best person to ask as I only go to the movies once or twice a year. Rom might be of more use.
Americans loved Priscilla,you gota see Ball Room is really great.I liked Muriels Wedding in fact Tony Collette is becomng very popular in the States like In her Shoes and Little Miss Sunshine shes done more just cant think of them right now.I love Terrance Stamp.Is he an Aussie?
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Old 11-08-2007, 09:54 PM   #39
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Americans loved Priscilla,you gota see Ball Room is really great.I liked Muriels Wedding in fact Tony Collette is becomng very popular in the States like In her Shoes and Little Miss Sunshine shes done more just cant think of them right now.I love Terrance Stamp.Is he an Aussie?
Nah, Terrance Stamp is English originally but I think now lives in the US. He was well known for spaghetti westerns.

Paul Mecurio from Ballroom, is one of our judges on Dancing with the Stars. Sonia Kruger, the hostess of Dancing, was also in Ballroom.

If you have seen Chuck and Larry Get Married (or similar), you might want to check out Strange Bedfellows. There was a big hooha that Bedfellows got ripped off.

Oh, Japanese Story won quite a few awards and had Toni Collette in too.
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Old 11-12-2007, 01:56 PM   #40
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This has me very curious. What about sauteing them keeps them from floating?
I don't have a proven answer, but can offer a good theory. I was taught that when you make stock, you always start with cold water, to coagulate the proteins, unless you roast or caramelize the bones/whatever first. I used to always start with raw shells/heads for shrimp stock, celery, carrots, onions, parsley stems, etc., along with the cold water. The proteins in the shells, as well as the "juices" on the shell, will coagulate as the water heats up. These proteins float upwards as a foam. I think that the "foam" causes the shells to float. I used to weigh the shells down with a plate to keep them submerged.

One of the cooks I work with always sautes his shrimp shells/heads when he makes shrimp stock. I started doing that as well, as I liked the flavor that caramelized all that stuff imparts on the stock. It wasn't until I cooked shrimp stock by sauteing the shells first that I noticed the shells didn't float after it came to a boil.
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