"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Fish & Seafood
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-01-2006, 11:08 AM   #21
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Tom, the shrimp to which you refer, with the shell split and the vein removed, are called "easy-peel", and I love them.

Aunt Dot, the polite name for the intestine is "sand vein".

My mother, a school teacher, was always big on using "proper terminology". I guess it rubbed off on me.
__________________

__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 11:32 AM   #22
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,265
I think what Andy M. was getting at a while back is that almost all shrimp sold in most parts of the US has been previously frozen.

The "fresh" shrimp you see sitting on the ice is almost assuredly thawed frozen shrimp, unless you live in a part of the world where shrimp is caught and shipped to the store right away.

Thus, you are generally better off buying hard frozen shrimp, rather than shrimp that has been hard frozen and then thawed and sitting out for who-knows-how-long.

You can buy frozen shrimp already deveined. Admittedly, sometimes they aren't exactly gentle in the mechanical deveining process, but it depends on how picky you are about that. If you are, buy them as is and use a sharp knife.
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 12:17 PM   #23
Senior Cook
 
Hopz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Utah, near Park City
Posts: 272
What I mean about traps in my yard is that I lived on a canal off the intercoastal waterway in Florida. My boat dock and seawall were my back yard. I made traps like most of my neighbors and everyday, before going to work, I would go back there and empty the traps. Some days I would get one or two. Most days 2 or 3 pounds. Big days I woud get 5+pounds, and all these shrimp were very large... about 20-25/lb.

We called then three-biters... three bites per shrimp.
As for dealing with alive shrimp- I just drained off the salt water- and pourde in a few pounds of ice- enough to cover them. They passed away peacefully and were ready to be de-headed.
Fresh shrimp are sweeter, more tender, less rubberry and altogether better than those poor things frozen in Thailand and air freighted to the west coast.

Anyone who lives near the Florida/Gulf Coast/Texas etc, can find a shrimper that will sell fresh. Just let your nose be your guide. Sniff them and you will know. If it does not smell like sea water- go to the next guy.

Enjoy them bugs.... If you insist, I will pass along the family secret for boiled shrimp; just ask.
__________________
Favorite Quote: "Time Flies Like an Arrow - Fruit Flies Like a Banana"
Groucho Marx
Hopz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 12:28 PM   #24
Executive Chef
 
boufa06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Volos, Greece
Posts: 3,467
In the Far East, prawns (big shrimps) are available fresh in local markets. They come in various sizes. "Large" prawns are usually around 4-5 inches long. Medium-size prawns (2-4 inches long) are the most economical and popular. Prawns are easily deveined when fresh because their flesh is firm. Very large prawns are also available at prices that escalate very rapidly with size. Despite the exorbitant prices of such prawns, no fishmonger I know would ever peel and devein for the customer.

If ever fresh prawns/shrimps are available in your area, it's good to buy them with the shell on if the price is right as you can easily use the shells to boil and use the stock to flavour a variety of dishes. Also IMO, fresh prawns are tastier than frozen shelled prawns which might have been parboiled to make peeling easier. Most likely this is the reason that frozen shelled prawns appeared reddish, ie. the colour of cooked prawns, rather than greyish/greenish/bluish or whatever the natural colour of a given prawn variety may be.

Sadly, over here, only small shrimps are available fresh mostly during the winter months. Because of this, I usually stock my freezer with large quantities during this time of the year. So you can imagine the amount of work involved in peeling for myself and mil since I am not as lucky as Buckytom to have prawn peeling services available in the neighbourhood. In a way, I would call myself a good prawn peeler save for the fact that in Singapore "prawn peeler" is a very derogatory term for ladies. As for large prawns, I buy them frozen with the shell on usually from importers/wholesalers.
__________________
The proof of the pudding is in the eating!
boufa06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 02:18 PM   #25
Sous Chef
 
attie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Mackay Queensland Australia
Posts: 719
"sand vein" Thank you constance, that is a much nicer term, I shall remember that.
I should have explained that, to us, shrimp live in fresh water. I don't know what you call them over there.
Buckytom also made mention of "steaming", I've also heard of steaming soft shell crabs,we never steam prawns nor crabs. Then, we never get soft shell crabs and we call it boiling, not broiling. It's a bit confusing for me.
__________________
attie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 02:39 PM   #26
Executive Chef
 
boufa06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Volos, Greece
Posts: 3,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by attie
"sand vein" Thank you constance, that is a much nicer term, I shall remember that.
I should have explained that, to us, shrimp live in fresh water. I don't know what you call them over there.
Buckytom also made mention of "steaming", I've also heard of steaming soft shell crabs,we never steam prawns nor crabs. Then, we never get soft shell crabs and we call it boiling, not broiling. It's a bit confusing for me.
Fresh prawns and hard shell crabs can be steamed whole. They taste very sweet. You can eat them plain or with sauces such as light soya, chilli, etc. Soft shell crabs if they are small can be deep fried and eaten with the shell. They can be served as an appetizer.
__________________
The proof of the pudding is in the eating!
boufa06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 03:07 PM   #27
Assistant Cook
 
dergyll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 26
How do you actually cook soft-shelled crabs?

My family loves crabbing when I lived in NJ and we would occasionally scoop up these gooey-mess of a crab. Plain steaming works best for those blue crabs. I just eat the meat but my aunt eats the inside part, says they taste like the sea...

Derg

By the way, what the heck is this? I found it in my local Asian market, the old CHinese dude told me it's a type of shrimp...
__________________
dergyll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 03:11 PM   #28
Sous Chef
 
attie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Mackay Queensland Australia
Posts: 719
Quote:
Originally Posted by boufa06
Fresh prawns and hard shell crabs can be steamed whole. They taste very sweet. You can eat them plain or with sauces such as light soya, chilli, etc. Soft shell crabs if they are small can be deep fried and eaten with the shell. They can be served as an appetizer.
Thanks for that, I add a little sugar to the salted water when boiling prawns or crabs and then shock them in ice water to cool them so I must give the steaming bit a go. Should I cool them in the ice water or just let them cool naturally
__________________
attie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 03:14 PM   #29
Sous Chef
 
attie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Mackay Queensland Australia
Posts: 719
Quote:
Originally Posted by dergyll
How do you actually cook soft-shelled crabs?

My family loves crabbing when I lived in NJ and we would occasionally scoop up these gooey-mess of a crab. Plain steaming works best for those blue crabs. I just eat the meat but my aunt eats the inside part, says they taste like the sea...

Derg

By the way, what the heck is this? I found it in my local Asian market, the old CHinese dude told me it's a type of shrimp...
We call them Mantis Shrimp or Prawn Eater, not very common here
__________________
attie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 03:24 PM   #30
Executive Chef
 
boufa06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Volos, Greece
Posts: 3,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by dergyll
How do you actually cook soft-shelled crabs?

My family loves crabbing when I lived in NJ and we would occasionally scoop up these gooey-mess of a crab. Plain steaming works best for those blue crabs. I just eat the meat but my aunt eats the inside part, says they taste like the sea...

Derg

By the way, what the heck is this? I found it in my local Asian market, the old CHinese dude told me it's a type of shrimp...
Me too and prawn catching also but there is no place to go for that here. I have not cooked soft shell crabs as it's difficult to get hold of them. From the ones served in restaurants, I think you need only to marinate them in a bit of salt, pepper, dust them with flour and deep fry them until crispy. By the way, they go very well with a cold beer! There are male and female crabs. The female ones have a pouch attached to the shell. These ones have a lot of roe, so what your aunt is eating is the roe which is very tasty.

I do believe you have posted something but my computer cannot pick it up. Is it some kind of scampi with big head?
__________________

__________________
The proof of the pudding is in the eating!
boufa06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.