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Old 12-22-2008, 05:41 PM   #11
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hmmmm I'll try that next time wich will probably be this week since I just found out my little one LOVES salmon!! :)
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Old 12-22-2008, 05:42 PM   #12
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Uh - unless there's something dry & crunchy on the fish, you ain't going to get anything even remotely resembling a "crunch". And frankly, I've never had "crunchy" salmon in a restaurant, so don't have a clue what you're talking about.

That said, all I can advise is to roll your salmon in some seasoned flour before sauteeing. You won't get a "crunchy" coating, but you'll get a somewhat crispy exterior.
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Old 12-22-2008, 05:43 PM   #13
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oh there is no skin they were just filets I bought ...steaks are the ones that usually have the skin on right?
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Old 12-22-2008, 05:50 PM   #14
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I use steaks - with skin. And I achieve a light crisp with my method.
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Old 12-22-2008, 05:51 PM   #15
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you can get skin on fillets too. That super crispy topping is the fried skin. You season the skin and fry that face first. I think this is true I have never had success with a "searing" skinless piece of salmon... I always end up sort of frying it.

I have very mixed results with fish... sometimes its great sometimes its dreadful... sometimes its the fish but sometimes its me :)
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Old 12-22-2008, 06:20 PM   #16
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When I cook salmon filets (skinless), I rub it liberally with Cajun seasoning, then cook it in a very hot cast iron frying pan in a mixture of half butter, half corn oil. I DO get a nice crunchy crust, and the challenge is not to overcook it, because it cooks very fast. Can't really include garlic because it would burn in the high heat.
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Old 12-22-2008, 07:03 PM   #17
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You may consider getting that crunch from a different place than the cooking method Dee. I know I've seen a ton of great recipes for crusted salmon, my favorite is wasabi pea crusted salmon. The wasabi flavor isn't too much at all and it adds a very nice asain flavor. I always broil my salmon, dry italian bread crumbs may work for you as well.
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Old 12-22-2008, 08:20 PM   #18
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deelady, start with dry fish. Add the lemon after cooking. Get the pan hot and add the oil and heat that up. Use a generous amount of oil.

Don't cook it super fast like pan searing a steak. Let it sizzle in the oil for a while and it will get crispy and brown.
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Old 12-22-2008, 09:22 PM   #19
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Deelady - Just an idea, but how about a trip under the broiler after it is cooked to crisp the skin?

AC
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Old 12-22-2008, 09:49 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
deelady, start with dry fish. Add the lemon after cooking. Get the pan hot and add the oil and heat that up. Use a generous amount of oil.

Don't cook it super fast like pan searing a steak. Let it sizzle in the oil for a while and it will get crispy and brown.
Andy's got it right for the home cook, Deelady. In the restaurant, you may be experiencing the effects of the salamander crisping the outer layer of the fish. A good broiler can reproduce this.
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