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Old 05-16-2006, 04:54 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
this is gremolata, no?
exact.....
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Old 05-16-2006, 05:10 PM   #22
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Usually when I cook with fish the amount of salt I use varies with the type of fish that I use. Swordfish is one of those that actually needs a little salt.
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Old 05-16-2006, 05:29 PM   #23
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Here in the Great Lakes Region, you can get superior fish from a Lake Superior (ha ha, pun intended, and yes, I'm a Dad so I have licence to tell corny puns, in fact, it's my job!) But seriously, If wild trout make up the meal, and that fish is caught from any of the streams feeding the big lake, the flesh is light orange in color, and the flavor is robust and amazing. Salt helps temper the flavor. Stocked trout and salmon have a lighter flavor, and so require less seasoning, just a hint. Mebers of the perch and pike families are very mild, and almost sweet in flavor. Just the salt contained in butter is sufficient to flavor them.

IN my opinion, the stronger the fish flavor, the more salt is required to ballance it.

Another way to ballance fish flavor is by cooking it with other ingredients. Fresh speckled or rainbow trout (no larger that 12 inches please for best flavor), cooked in a foil packet along with butter, sliced potatoes, and sliced carrots is an extaordinary meal. Little or no salt is needed for that.

So, it just depends on what you are cooking, the kind of fish you are preparing, and how you prepare it.

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Old 05-16-2006, 06:21 PM   #24
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yes on anchovies for me and my cat too
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Old 05-16-2006, 09:24 PM   #25
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Weed, you mentioned Rainbow Trout. I love that fish. The best I've had was in Tennessee, and it was always lightly coated and pan-fried.
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Old 05-16-2006, 10:40 PM   #26
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Hey, at least 3 web sites say Gremolata is lemon, garlic and parsley. So what the heck did I just make? (lemon, parsley, anchovy, olive oil).

ANy suggestions on how to use this stuff? It's pretty awesome..
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Old 05-17-2006, 10:21 AM   #27
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I am with JP and RDG, I actually only use salt when making a fish stew, for the rest, no salt, I figure the lemon or whatever herbs I have used work,not to forget the sauce that goes with it, and I enjoy my fish that way. I could never dream of salting fish that's on the plate ready to eat.Anchovies? well, not quite a fun, I cannot eat much of it.
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Old 05-17-2006, 11:46 AM   #28
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Actually the salt water fish already has some salty element in its flesh. Thus I always take care to go very light on salt otherwise it will get too salty.
Also if I use caper or olives, items already salted, usually no added salt will be necessary.
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